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Historical Reissue Classical CDs, LPs, 78s,
Related Books & Ephemera
Since 1972

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Caniell's Immortal Performances presents

the SZELL 1945 Met MEISTERSINGER,

w.JANSSEN, KULLMAN & STEBER . . .

Yves St Laurent offers

NATHAN MILSTEIN;

MUNCH, Vol. 27;

CRESPIN, Vol. 2 . . .

and numerous more CDs on our 50% SALE



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This week's HISTORICAL OFFERINGS:

  • NATHAN MILSTEIN, w. Szell Cond. Cleveland Orch.: Symphonie Espagnole (Lalo), Live Performance, 4 Jan., 1968, Severance Hall; w.Louis Fremaux Cond. ORTF S.O.: Violin Concerto in D (Brahms), Live Performance, 22 June, 1967, Paris. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-666. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0727)

    "Always putting the music before himself was a hallmark of Milstein’s humility and humanity….The instrument is an extension of the human voice, and the bow is to playing the violin as the breath is to singing….I measure violinists by somewhat different standards; and by those standards, if anyone deserves the title of greatest violinist of the 20th century, it is Nathan Milstein."


    - Jerry Dubins, FANFARE, Jan./Feb., 2006


    "Nathan Milstein was a violinist’s violinist. While he possessed a superb virtuoso technique, he was never ostentatious. When the music sparkled as he played, it was because he was clearly enjoying it and wanted you to enjoy it too, not because he wanted to dazzle you with his own personality or tone, à la Heifetz. He could do justice to true musical masterpieces, and not just use them as vehicles for display as Heifetz too often did….If you want to hear a master enjoying himself, this set is a good choice."


  • - Joseph Magil, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, Nov./Dec., 2005




  • DIE MEISTERSINGER, Live Performance, 10 Feb., 1945, (replete with Milton Cross’ commentaries), w.Szell Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Herbert Janssen, Eleanor Steber, Kerstin Thorborg, Charles Kullman, Emanuel List, Mack Harrell, John Garris, etc. (Canada) 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1088. Notes by Richard Caniell as well as a second article by Caniell and Anne Woods. Transfers by Richard Caniell. Elaborate Edition features numerous lovely photos & 54pp booklet. (OP3276)

    “….is this a performance that Wagnerians will want to add to their collection? Yes. Absolutely, without a doubt. First, even though we don’t have his first 32 minutes, Szell’s conducting is a miracle of clarity, balancing of textures, rhythmic vitality, and dramatic cohesion. One doesn’t think of Szell as much in terms of sensitivity as one does for precision and incisiveness. But he balances everything here perfectly, conducting numbers like the great Quintet with warmth and a genuine lyrical flow. And his clarification of Wagner’s orchestral textures is, even in this 1945 monaural broadcast, unmatched. DIE MEISTERSINGER flies by because of the variety of color and finely sprung rhythms Szell brings to it. He even seems to be conducting with a smile at times. His is a masterful reading, and one we would be poorer without. Szell clearly also deserves the credit for the overall sense of ensemble among the singers. Characters vividly interact with each other; musical dialogues and multi-voiced ensembles are genuine moments of communication between real people, not vocalists competing with each other for vocal attention.

    If I start on the singers with Eleanor Steber it is because of the rarity of hearing her in a Wagnerian role....The purity and beauty of Steber’s sound, her ability to spin a long line, and her dramatic concentration and specificity of inflection brings to life a character who often seems a cipher. Her voice glows, and her soft high singing is breathtaking. She limns beautiful, generous phrases in the Quintet, and the heartfelt outpouring of affection for Sachs in ‘O Sachs, mein Freund’ is deeply felt.

    In Charles Kullman we have another wonderful American singer as Walther. In Caniell’s notes he points to a slight coarsening of tone between the 1939 performance and this one. If it is there, it is very slight. He was another singer with a very wide repertoire who gave many years to the Met, and while he will always be a bit in the shadow of Melchior, his is a superbly beautiful performance surely worthy of the prize in the song contest. His singing was always founded on a smooth emission of tone, an evenness throughout his range, and well thought-out phrasing. His Prize Song is deeply heartfelt and urgent - it is clear that he is expressing both his love for Eva as well as his desire to win the contest.

    At the center of any Meistersinger cast is, of course, Hans Sachs….Now we have the evidence in front of us, and the fact is that Janssen is a marvelous Sachs. It is true that his voice was lighter than Schorr’s, and certainly Schorr was also a great artist and a great Sachs. But so is Janssen, despite less vocal weight than we are used to in the role. His singing is lyrically beautiful, and in particular he conveys the humanity of the character in myriad ways through inflection and subtle emphasis of inflection. The contrast between his nobility and human warmth and Beckmesser’s superficiality (admittedly a caricature by Wagner) is clearly portrayed in their scenes together....

    Immortal Performances lives up to its usual extraordinary production standards, with a lavish booklet containing wonderful photos and terrific notes on the performance as well as details of the process of preparing this production. Milton Cross’ announcements are also included, but separately tracked if you don’t enjoy the nice atmospheric touch they provide. In the end, probably the central value of this important release is Szell’s conducting. But there is much else about this historic performance that collectors will treasure.”


    - Henry Fogel, FANFARE, Nov. / Dec., 2017


    “Two artists in this broadcast not only deliver sterling performances, but also profoundly influence the interpretations of their colleagues. One of those impactful artists is (not surprisingly) conductor George Szell, at the absolute top of his form. It will surprise no one that Szell leads a performance of remarkable precision, one in which the orchestral and vocal lines emerge with sterling clarity. The melee toward the close of Act II is a case in point, a virtuoso tour-de-force that is all the more humorous because of its razor-sharp precision…. Herbert Janssen is magnificent in the central role of Hans Sachs. Janssen’s characteristic warmth of voice and personality is evident throughout. Those traits seem to affect his colleagues as well. In Eva and Walther’s conversations with Sachs, both Steber and Kullman seem transfixed by Janssen’s personality and art. In those episodes, their voices and manner take on an additional degree of intensity and rapt beauty. Janssen brings a Lieder artist’s sensitivity to diction, phrasing, and dynamics. In fine voice throughout, Janssen is also able to summon more than adequate power and boisterousness for the Act II scene with Beckmesser (‘Jerum! Jerum!’)…. Both Eleanor Steber and Charles Kullman approach ideal assumptions of the roles of Eva and Walther von Stolzing. Steber, then a lyric soprano with a rich, gorgeous instrument, embodies Eva’s warmth, kindness of heart, and youthful passion. It’s not surprising that such an accomplished Mozart interpreter also dispatches Eva’s trills with technical elan and beauty. Like Steber’s, Kullman’s attractive lyric instrument has ample heft and metal, and he sings Walther’s music with assurance and stamina, no mean feat in this most demanding and lengthy work. Kullman is absolutely convincing as a young, headstrong knight, who also bears the heart of a poet. Gerhard Pechner, too, is one of the finest Beckmessers on disc.

    If you love DIE MEISTERSINGER (as I do), you owe it to yourself to hear this Met 1945 broadcast, a performance that captures, as well as any I’ve heard, the beauty and humanity of Wagner’s incomparable creation.”


  • - Ken Meltzer, FANFARE, Nov. / Dec., 2017




  • CHARLES MUNCH Cond. Boston S.O.: Symphony #10 – Adagio (Mahler-Krenek), Live Performance, 4 Dec, 1959; Symphony #7 in C (Sibelius), Live Performance, 4 Oct., 1957; Symphony #7 in c-sharp (Prokofiev), Live Performance, 27 Nov., 1953. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-610, Live Performances, Symphony Hall, Boston. [Live performances brilliantly displaying the splendor of the Symphony Hall acoustic.] Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1639)

    "It's difficult to articulate what makes Munch's conducting special - or indeed if there even is anything identifiably unique about it. A lesser talent would simply turn out generic, cookie-cutter performances; but Munch was anything but generic. He was one of the most musical of conductors; in so many of his performances everything simply sounds 'right'. Certainly his experience as an orchestral musician gave him a lot of practical insight into the mechanics of directing orchestra traffic. But a classic Munch interpretation never sounds calculated. Spontaneity was one of his hallmarks, sometimes to the surprise and discomfort of the musicians playing under him. From one night to the next a Munch performance of the same piece might be very different, depending on his mood of the moment - yet it would always sound like Munch."


  • - Lawrence Hansen, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, Nov. / Dec., 2012




  • REGINE CRESPIN, w.John Wustman (Pf.): Songs by Schumann, Wolf, Canteloube, Faure, Rosenthal & Sauguet. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-742, Live Performance, Weston Country School Auditorium (MA), 10 Feb., 1967. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (V2579)

    "Regine Crespin, the French operatic soprano and later mezzo-soprano, one of the most important vocal artists to emerge from France in the decades after World War II was widely admired for the elegance, warmth and subtlety of her singing, especially in the French and German operatic repertories. Early on, the natural carrying power of her voice seemed to point to a career as a dramatic soprano. Indeed, she made her 1950 debut at the regional company in Mulhouse, France, singing Elsa in Wagner's LOHENGRIN. Yet Ms Crespin's singing was imbued with nuanced phrasing, telling attention to text, creamy lyricism and lovely high pianissimos. While she had an enveloping voice, she always seemed to keep something in reserve, leading some listeners to sense a touch too much French restraint. But most opera buffs valued Ms Crespin for the effortless richness, lyrical nobility and subtle colorings of her singing. She was also a sophisticated actress whose Junoesque presence commanded attention. Ms Crespin's Metropolitan Opera debut came in 1962 as the Marschallin in DER ROSENKAVALIER, directed by the soprano Lotte Lehmann, who had been the most renowned interpreter of the role. Reviewing Ms Crespin's portrayal, THE NEW YORK TIMES critic Harold C. Schonberg wrote that she gave 'a simply beautiful performance' [enriched with] 'all kinds of delicate shading'. But when she let out her full voice, he added, it 'soared over the orchestra and all over the house - big, confident and beautiful'. In 1967 she sang Sieglinde to Birgit Nilsson's Brunnhilde at the Met, with Herbert von Karajan conducting a production that he also directed. Reviewing that performance for THE TIMES of London, the critic Conrad L. Osborne wrote that 'Nilsson and Crespin spurring each other on make for the sort of thing one remembers with a chill for years'. In later life Ms Crespin won wide recognition as a voice teacher. During some 1995 master classes at the Mannes College of Music in New York, the students were enraptured not only by her insightful critiques, but by her insider tales about opera stars."


  • - Anthony Tommasini, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 6 July, 2007








    . . . REPEATED . . . FROM THE RECENT PAST . . .








  • SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY Cond. Boston S.O.: Concerto in D for Strings (Henri Casadesus); 'Rhenish' Symphony #3 in E-flat (Schumann); Symphony #7 in C (Sibelius). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL 78-643, Live Performances, 1944-48. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1633)

    “Koussevitzky gave [the Sibelius Seventh] its American premiere, and was admired by the composer for his performance (it was also Koussevitzky, a passionate Sibelian, who was teased by the prospect of premiering the Eighth Symphony, which never appeared). Sibelius and Koussevitzky collectors may well wish to add this performance from eleven years later and with his extraordinary Boston musicians, but the recessed sonic picture makes it difficult to recommend to general collectors…..Although the broadcast is four years earlier than the Sibelius (1944 vs. 1948), the sound is light years better. In fact this sounds like a state-of-the-art 1948 studio recording, with the rich colors produced by the Boston musicians vividly conveyed. Tempi are on the quick side, but the playing is supple and warm, so the result doesn’t sound rushed at all. One notes Koussevitzky’s famed ear for color and balance, particularly in the Intermezzo. The strings produce a warm, dark and rich sonority while never covering the woodwinds. The tempo adjustments that the conductor employs never seem arbitrary - everything seems to flow naturally. The ritard at the end of the Intermezzo is fairly severe but very smoothly executed. Throughout, this is a performance offering high drama and a richly romantic view of the music. There is nothing small scaled about this ‘Rhenish’. It is a reading of opulence and grandeur, trmonding one of a bygone era.

    I am not aware of any prior release of this performance, or any other Schumann Third by Koussevitzky, which makes this release by St. Laurent Studio a disc of extraordinary importance in documenting the work of one of the 20th century’s most important conductors. That they have transferred it in such superb monaural sound makes it all that much better.”


  • - Henry Fogel, FANFARE




  • FRITZ REINER Cond. Chicago Orch.: 'The Great' Symphony #9 in C (Schubert), Live Performance, 19 Dec., 1957, Orchestra Hall, Chicago; Irmelin - Prelude for Orchestra (Delius), Broadcast Performance, 10 Feb., 1954, WGN-TV Studios; Francesca da Rimini in e (Tschaikowsky), Broadcast Performance, 4 Nov., 1953, WGN-TV Studios. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-607. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1632)

    “The two major works on this disc are new additions to the Reiner discography, and the third (the IRMELIN prelude) was issued previously only by the Chicago Symphony, available for fund-raising purposes. Clearly the addition of works as important as FRANCESCA DA RIMINI and Schubert’s ‘Great’ C Major Symphony to the available recordings by one of the most important conductors of the 20th century is an event of significance, and we should be grateful to St. Laurent Studio, and to Norbeck, Peters & Ford, the label’s sales outlet (www.norpete.com) for this release….this disc is virtually self-recommending.

    Most importantly, there is Schubert’s Ninth Symphony, a staple of the repertoire that Reiner never recorded for RCA. This performance had languished in the CSO Archives since 1957, when it was broadcast live on WBAI radio in New York. The CSO trustees permitted live broadcasts of the 1957–58 season on that station but refused to permit them in Chicago for fear it would hurt attendance. A special phone line was set up from city to city to enable these transmissions. Subsequently, much of the material was issued by the CSO either in their centennial box set of 12 CDs, their turn-of-the-millennium set of 10 CDs, or as individual releases in conjunction with a fund-raising radio marathon produced on WFMT.

    Full acknowledgement: during those years I was President of the CSO and oversaw those releases. I put together a committee that included Norman Pellegrini and Don Tait from WFMT, Gerald Stein (a very knowledgeable music lover in Chicago), Martha Gilmer the CSO’s Artistic Administrator, and Gary Stucka (a CSO cellist with a passion for historic recordings), and we went through the recorded archives each year to determine which performances we would release. This Schubert Ninth was never chosen for one very specific technical reason: a complete drop-out to silence from 9:01 to 9:04 in the second movement. We felt that it was jarring, and we always had something else we preferred. There is also a second problem in the original, a drop in volume at 7:08 in the third movement, after which the volume slowly fades back up until it reaches the correct level again at about 7:50. It is worth noting that Norbeck, Peters & Ford makes a point of mentioning these flaws in their listing.

    But now that virtually every note of Reiner’s CSO career has been released in one form or another, one is grateful to St. Laurent for making this Schubert Ninth available, warts and all. The orchestral playing is glorious, proving that the CSO was performing at the highest international level during the middle of Reiner’s tenure. First oboe Ray Still is uniquely beautiful in the slow movement, and the orchestra’s overall energy and precision are qualities that provoke admiration still. Reiner was famous for rarely smiling (the photo on the back of the insert makes that clear), and one can imagine a Schubert ‘Great’ with more geniality and warmth. This is Schubert given with the strength and gravitas that one would apply to Beethoven. There is, however, nothing wrong-headed about such an approach, especially when the performance offers this remarkable degree of concentration and commitment. One interpretive oddity is the extremely slow tempo Reiner takes for the Trio section of the third movement, but he makes it work as dramatic contrast. The finale is rendered with unusual thrust and intensity.

    St. Laurent Studio’s usual high level of sound restoration is in evidence here. The rich, warm sound of the old Orchestra Hall, extremely well captured by the original engineer’s mike placement, is faithfully reproduced in the Schubert. The dry WGN-TV studio sound is given as much warmth as possible. For the many fans of Fritz Reiner, this release is of enormous importance.”


  • - Henry Fogel, FANFARE




  • HERMANN ABENDROTH Cond. Leningrad Phil.: Symphony #1 in C (Beethoven); Symphony #5 in e (Tschaikowsky). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-627, Live Performance, 31 Oct., 1954. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1625)

    “Hermann Abendroth (1883–1956) deserves a greater reputation than he has….After the war Abendroth found himself in East Germany, and because of his Nazi associations he was barred from conducting briefly. He protested that he had never attended any political rally or meeting, which ultimately led to his name being cleared. The Communists appointed him as head of the Radio Orchestra in Leipzig. The bulk of his late career was spent in Communist-controlled countries, including Russia and Czechoslovakia, but also Scandinavia.

    The performance of Beethoven’s First Symphony manages to be both granitic and flexible at the same time. The orchestral sound has weight. The double basses and cellos are more forward than one is used to from Mravinsky recordings, but the texture is never overly heavy. Think of Klemperer with added grace and a smile.

    The Tchaikovsky is a major performance. Since by 1954 the orchestra had played this music repeatedly under the strong-willed Mravinsky, it is a testament to the strength of Abendroth’s musical personality that he could fashion something considerably different. The Adagio molto introduction is extremely slow but delicate and lyrical rather than weighty. Then the transition to the main Allegro con brio is done gradually. It takes a minute or two for Abendroth to reach what is ultimately a relatively normal tempo, and once he does, he applies further acceleration. Throughout all four movements, this is a mercurial, flexible performance. What makes it special is the conviction with which it is presented, both from the conductor and the musicians. One feels that one is participating in an event, not just a standard reading of an oft-played work. There is an intensity to the playing that grabs and involves the listener. Abendroth manages to encompass the lyrically beautiful and the dramatically powerful into a unified whole….This is a recording I expect to return to frequently.”


  • - Henry Fogel, FANFARE


  • GEORGE SZELL Cond. Cleveland Orch., w. CLIFFORD CURZON: Piano Concerto #27 in B-flat, K.595 - Live Performance, 30 Nov., 1969; w. CHRISTOPH ESCHENBACH: Piano Concerto #19 in F, K.459 - Live Performance, 16 Jan., 1969 (Eschenbach's American debut) (both Mozart, both Severance Hall); Eschenbach interview with Martin Perlich. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-545. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1622)

    “In the sports world commentators will wryly speak of a player as not quite at the level for his sport’s Hall of Fame but not too far below. Such players would qualify for a Hall of the Very Good. It strikes me that what we have here is a Hall of Fame pianist and a Hall of the Very Good pianist. Of course, the comparison is inherently unfair: Clifford Curzon was at the very peak of his career at age 62, whereas Christoph Eschenbach was making his American debut in 1969 at the age of 28. But by placing the two pianists on the same disc with the same orchestra and conductor from the same year, St. Laurent Studio invites the comparison.

    Clifford Curzon was one of the most highly regarded pianists of his era, and his playing of Mozart’s final concerto here is pure magic. In lyrical passages, particularly in the second movement, one could be listening to a great bel canto soprano. The relationship between Mozart’s piano concertos and his operatic writing was pointed out by the late Charles Rosen, and it seems central to the way Curzon plays. The vocal quality of the writing remained forefront in my mind as I listened to this performance. At the same time there is a spark and wit in the music’s more ebullient moments and a buoyancy to the rhythms. Curzon and Szell always brought out the best in each other (their classic Decca recording of Brahms’ First Piano Concerto is a prime example). Szell found a warmer, lyrical side when accompanying Curzon, and Curzon’s rhythmic articulation became a bit firmer (though I would argue that it was the conductor who made the larger adjustment). This performance might appear superfluous, because there are multiple Curzon readings of Piano Concerto #27 available conducted by Adrian Boult, Benjamin Britten, Daniel Barenboim, Rafael Kubelik, and even an early Decca with Szell. I know most, but not all, of them. For vitality, concentration of energy, and beauty, I would rank this new account as highly as any.

    The Szell / Eschenbach pairing is very fine also but not quite at the same level. Eschenbach seems a bit more studied, his forte a bit harsher, his line a touch less flowing. Heard on its own this would be counted as a lovely performance. Heard after Curzon’s it loses some of its luster. Although they are placed on the disc in the order of the headnote, I would recommend listening to them in reverse order so that you don’t immediately start comparing Eschenbach’s playing with Curzon’s. There is a great deal to recommend this performance, particularly the remarkable precision of intonation and ensemble from one of the world’s great orchestras. In both readings the wind soloists are outstanding.

    The inclusion of a 10-minute interview by Martin Perlich of Eschenbach is a nice filler, but Perlich’s rather hesitant, jerky way of phrasing questions, and Eschenbach’s nervousness (this was, after all, his first appearance in America), make it something to be heard only once. The sound is spectacularly good for 1969 live performances, thanks to the original engineering of Cleveland radio station WCLV and St. Laurent Studio’s excellent transfer. St. Laurent Studio recordings are available at Norbeck, Peters & Ford (norpete.com).”


  • - Henry Fogel, FANFARE


  • LEONARD BERNSTEIN Cond. NYPO: Symphony #83 in g (Haydn); Study in Sonority (Riegger); Symphony #6 in d (Sibelius). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-615, Live Performance, 5 May, 1967, Philharmonic Hall, New York. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1621)

    “The Sixth Symphony is one of the toughest of Sibelius’ seven to lead. It can easily seem like a shapeless series of fragmentary moments. It lacks the long-breathed thematic material and development to be found in varying forms in four of the first five symphonies (#3 is another enigmatic piece). One of the oddities about the Sibelius Sixth is that each movement doesn’t really build to a climax. The music progresses along, and then stops. Bernstein, with a complete mastery of the concept of tension and release, along with an infinite variety of colors and degrees of intensity at his disposal, makes it all seem like a logical progression. The studio recording was made four days after this live performance from 1967, which has even more frisson than that admirable effort. The rhythmic intensity Bernstein builds in the third movement is almost ferocious, and he manages to weave the varying threads of the finale into something with structural unity and a sense of direction. The Philharmonic plays brilliantly for him.

    Bernstein’s Haydn recordings have always been highly regarded. James H. North summed up Bernstein’s quite remarkable affinity for Haydn in a comprehensive review in FANFARE 33:2, noting that even the eminent Haydn scholar H. C. Robbins Landon was an enthusiastic admirer of Bernstein’s way with this music. As with Sibelius, this live performance of Symphony #83 has just a touch more energy and presence than the studio recordings. Bernstein’s Haydn displays grace, textural clarity (he always reduced the strings), brilliant wind playing, wit, and that hard-to-define quality known as character. This performance treats the music with the same significance and command that conductors usually reserve for Mozart and Beethoven, without weighing the Symphony down….”


  • - Henry Fogel, FANFARE




  • KAREL ANCERL Cond. Cleveland Orch.: MA VLAST - Sarka (Smetana); 'New World' Symphony #9 in e (Dvorak); w.GARY GRAFFMAN: Piano Concerto #3 in C (Prokofiev). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-617, Live Performance, 12 July, 1969, Blossom Music Festival. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1638)



  • KLAUS TENNSTEDT Cond. Boston Symphony Orchestra: 'Pastoral' Symphony #6 in F; Symphony #8 in F (both Beethoven). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-730, Live Performance, 27 July, 1975. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1637)



  • BRUNO WALTER: A Treasury of Little Known Broadcasts, w. Eleanor Steber, Leopold Simoneau, George London, William Warfield, Jennie Tourel, Maureen Forrester, Nadine Conner, Irmgard Seefried, Jean Watson, Vladimir Horowitz, John Newmark, Yehudi Wyner, Westminster Choir, Concertgebouw Orch. & New York Philharmonic. (Canada) 4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1099, Live Performances, 1936-71, also offers Jim Fassett's broadcast commentary & Elaborate 37pp Booklet. Transfers by Richard Caniell. Program Notes by James Altena & Richard Caniell. (C1629)



  • CHARLES MUNCH Cond. Boston S.O.: 'Deliciae Basiliensis' Symphony #4 (Honegger); w. CHRISTIAN FERRAS: Violin Concerto in D (Brahms). [The Symphony #4 by Swiss composer Arthur Honegger is a work for orchestra, written in 1946 on a commission from Paul Sacher. Subtitled 'Deliciae Basiliensis', it was first performed on 21 January 1947, by the chamber orchestra Basler Kammerorchester under Sacher. Containing musical quotations from two Basel folk songs it expresses the composer's happiness during a pleasant stay in the Swiss countryside after the end of World War II. Despite the pastoral and often joyous mood throughout much of the symphony, the closing minutes include some tragic or more serious elements.] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-608, Live Performance, 7 March, 1959, Symphony Hall, Boston. [Live performances brilliantly displaying the splendor of the Symphony Hall acoustic.] Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1636)



  • CARMEN, recorded 1954, w.Gressier Cond. Denise Scharley, Libero de Luca, Martha Angelici, Michel Roux, Robert Massard, etc. (France) 2-Malibran 821. [A thrilling and truly idiomatic performance, especially from the radiant Scharley! Highly recommended!] (OP3275)



  • FAUST - Excerpts, Live Performance, 1965, w.Etcheverry Cond. Alain Vanzo, Renee Doria, Adrien Legros, Robert Massard, etc. (France) Malibran AMR 168. (OP3273)



  • OTELLO (in German) - Excerpts, recorded 1943, w.Elmendorff Cond. Berlin Radio Ensemble; Helge Roswaenge, Maria Reining, Hans Reinmar, etc.; HANS REINMAR: Arias & Scenes from Don Carlos, Ballo, Simon Boccanegra, Carmen & L'Africaine. [Surely we would pay a king's ransom in our own time to hear such a formidable . . . and sensitive . . . Otello as Roswaenge!] (France) Malibran AMR 171. (OP3274)



  • REGINE CRESPIN, w.John Wustman (Pf.): Songs by Wolf, Rosenthal, Debussy, Poulenc, Milhaud & Berlioz. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-741, Live Performance, Hunter College, New York, 11 Nov., 1967. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (V2578)



  • CHARLES RICHARD: Le temps des cerises (Jean-Baptiste Clement); Arias from Lakme, Manon, Mignon, Werther, Mireille, Les Contes d'Hoffmann, Rigoletto, Tosca & La Boheme; CHARLES RICHARD & ODETTE TURBA-RABIER: Lakme - D'ou viens-tu...C'est le dieu de la jeunesse. (France) Malibran AMR 170. (V2581)



    --------------------------------------------------------
    SMARTER THAN BOTH OF US ! ! !
    --------------------------------------------------------
    We are grateful to so many of our readers who continue to note that our once-regular use of accent marks have become rather erratic. Due to the ever-growing popular use of ‘Smart’ Phones, Google automatically and frequently is restricting such marks, as well as that which we consider regular punctuation. In compliance with Google’s restrictive demands, as well as the fact that such complicated listings will require too long a period during which to download, or may not succeed in downloading at all, most of our newer listings are deleting such marks, much to our sense of loss. While our older listings so far retain such marks, we are informed that it won’t be long before they too automatically will be amended. We certainly take pride in our presentation, but are being compelled to adapt to another loss of style in these fast-paced times! We very sincerely appreciate so many of your valued comments and commiseration!!!





    A Celebration of Life



    for



    David Norbeck, 1937-2018



    Sunday, 16 September

    2:00 - 5:00 PM



    59 Congress Street

    St Albans



    up the driveway to garden gate




    -----------------------------------------


    . . . numerous out-of-print CDs and LPs, [many sealed

    copies of numerous out-of-print additions: The Record

    Collector, Naxos, VRCS, Issues of Symposium's Harold

    Wayne series, Romophone, GOP & many Met Opera

    broadcasts & operas from Moscow's Aquarius, plus

    Operas by Mercadante, Marais, Coccia, Vivaldi,

    Cherubini, Spontini, Ricci, Vaccaj, Fioravanti,

    Paisiello, Scarlatti, de Majo, Generali, Cavalli,

    Rameau, Lully, Pergolesi, Cimarosa, Anfossi, Pietri,

    Musinelli, Rossini, Charpentier, Gluck, Handel,

    Vivaldi, Monteverdi, Rossini, Cagnoni, Myslivecek,

    Mayr, Hasse, Meyerbeer, Weckerlin, Nicolai,

    Marschner, Gurlitt, Schreker, etc.] have been added

    throughout our listings, in appropriate categories . . .

    out-of-print books [many biographies,

    Record Catalogue- Discographies . . .

    and more CDs and books are added each week] . . .





    ---------------------------------------------------


    Our 50% Discount Sale continues,

    now offering more than 2200 titles . . .




    - - - - - - - 78rpm collectors, please note auctions from: Dave Schmutz, www.78classicalgallery.com - or at: 818-242-6247



    ------------------ ANNOUNCEMENT -----------------



    Norbeck, Peters & Ford's Annual 78rpm Has Now Closed!

    This auction featured an entire section of which is dedicated to 7" discs, plus many wonderful instrumental and vocal rarities, many of which we're offering for the first time in our 45 years of operation.

    You can still view the online version simply click the link below:

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    For the recently-offered Archipel, Myto, Gebhardt, Walhall, Melodiya, Vista Vera & Living Stage titles on sale, simply visit our sale section of our website). This is the ideal opportunity at bargain prices to fill in gaps in one's collection.

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  • Nathan Milstein;  Szell, Fremaux   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-666)
    S0727. NATHAN MILSTEIN, w. Szell Cond. Cleveland Orch.: Symphonie Espagnole (Lalo), Live Performance, 22 June, 1967, Paris. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-666. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $19.90
    Die Meistersinger  (Szell;  Janssen, Steber, Thorborg, Kullman, List, Harrell)  (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1088)
    OP3276. DIE MEISTERSINGER, Live Performance, 10 Feb., 1945, (replete with Milton Cross’ commentaries), w.Szell Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Herbert Janssen, Eleanor Steber, Kerstin Thorborg, Charles Kullman, Emanuel List, Mack Harrell, John Garris, etc. (Canada) 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1088. Notes by Richard Caniell as well as a second article by Caniell and Anne Woods. Transfers by Richard Caniell. Elaborate Edition features numerous lovely photos & 54pp booklet. - 752830574731
    $49.95
    Charles Munch, Vol. XXVII  -  Mahler, Sibelius & Prokofiev   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-610)
    C1639. CHARLES MUNCH Cond. Boston S.O.: Symphony #10 - Adagio (Mahler-Krenek), Live Performance, 4 Dec, 1959; Symphony #7 in C (Sibelius), Live Performance, 4 Oct., 1957; Symphony #7 in c-sharp (Prokofiev), Live Performance, 27 Nov., 1953. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-610, Live Performances, Symphony Hall, Boston. [Live performances brilliantly displaying the splendor of the Symphony Hall acoustic.] Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $19.90
    Regine Crespin, Vol. II;  John Wustman     (St Laurent Studio YSL T-742)
    V2579. REGINE CRESPIN, w.John Wustman (Pf.): Songs by Schumann, Wolf, Canteloube, Fauré, Rosenthal & Sauguet. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-742, Live Performance, Weston Country School Auditorium (MA), 10 Feb., 1967. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $19.90
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    Pelleas et Melisande  (Haitink - Boston;  Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, Keenlyside, Finley)   (3-St Laurent Studio YSL T-521)
    Pelleas et Melisande (Haitink - Boston; Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, Keenlyside, Finley) (3-St Laurent Studio YSL T-521)

    $49.90Renata Scotto, Vol. I  Hunter College, 1970;  John Wustman     (St Laurent Studio YSL T-665)
    Renata Scotto, Vol. I Hunter College, 1970; John Wustman (St Laurent Studio YSL T-665)

    $19.90Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. IV   (Bruckner 7th - Boston)      (St Laurent Studio YSL T-570)
    Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. IV (Bruckner 7th - Boston) (St Laurent Studio YSL T-570)

    $19.90Aida  /  Forza  (Bellezza;  Rethberg, Ponselle, Martinelli, Pinza, de Luca)  (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1071)
    Aida / Forza (Bellezza; Rethberg, Ponselle, Martinelli, Pinza, de Luca) (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1071)

    $39.90Samson et Dalila  (Pelletier;  Maison, Stevens, Warren, Moscona)     (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1084)
    Samson et Dalila (Pelletier; Maison, Stevens, Warren, Moscona) (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1084)

    $39.95Carmen - 9 Jan., 1937  (Papi;  Ponselle, Rayner, Bodanya, Huehn)   (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-649)
    Carmen - 9 Jan., 1937 (Papi; Ponselle, Rayner, Bodanya, Huehn) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-649)

    $39.95Salome - Two Performances (Reiner;  Welitsch;  Krauss;  Cebotari)  (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1089)
    Salome - Two Performances (Reiner; Welitsch; Krauss; Cebotari) (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1089)

    $49.95Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. I   (Bruckner 8th -  Boston)    (St Laurent Studio YSL T-332)
    Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. I (Bruckner 8th - Boston) (St Laurent Studio YSL T-332)

    $19.90Mark Reizen - Live Recital, 15 March, 1958    (Aquarius AQVR 408)
    Mark Reizen - Live Recital, 15 March, 1958 (Aquarius AQVR 408)

    $19.90Medea (Gui) /  Lucia di Lammermoor  (Cleva) - TWO Maria Callas Performances   (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1076)
    Medea (Gui) / Lucia di Lammermoor (Cleva) - TWO Maria Callas Performances (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1076)

    $49.95Walkure, Act III (Traubel, Janssen) - Tristan, Act II, 1944 (Melchior, Traubel)  (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1093)
    Walkure, Act III (Traubel, Janssen) - Tristan, Act II, 1944 (Melchior, Traubel) (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1093)

    $39.95Regine Crespin;  Karl Kritz, Thomas Schippers,  John Wustman      (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1085)
    Regine Crespin; Karl Kritz, Thomas Schippers, John Wustman (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1085)

    $39.90Istvan Kertesz;  Birgit Finnila & Simone Mangelsdorff   (Mahler)   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-451)
    Istvan Kertesz; Birgit Finnila & Simone Mangelsdorff (Mahler) (St Laurent Studio YSL T-451)

    $19.90Bruno Walter - Treasury of Little Known Broadcasts  (Steber, Tourel, Simoneau, Forrester)  (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1099)
    Bruno Walter - Treasury of Little Known Broadcasts (Steber, Tourel, Simoneau, Forrester) (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1099)

    $49.90Don Giovanni  (Bruno Walter;  Pinza, Rethberg, Lazzari, Dino Borgioli)  ( 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1091)
    Don Giovanni (Bruno Walter; Pinza, Rethberg, Lazzari, Dino Borgioli) ( 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1091)

    $49.90Forza  (Molinari-Pradelli;  Leontyne Price, Corelli, Merrill, Hines, Corena)   (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-652)
    Forza (Molinari-Pradelli; Leontyne Price, Corelli, Merrill, Hines, Corena) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-652)

    $39.95Der Fliegende Hollander  (Steiner;  Janssen, Bohme, Friedrich, Andersen)  (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1080)
    Der Fliegende Hollander (Steiner; Janssen, Bohme, Friedrich, Andersen) (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1080)

    $39.90Charles Munch, Vol. XVII;  Damnation de Faust (Steber, Singher, McCollum)  (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-458)
    Charles Munch, Vol. XVII; Damnation de Faust (Steber, Singher, McCollum) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-458)

    $29.90Erich Leinsdorf, Vol. IV;  Idil Biret - debut  (St Laurent Studio YSL T-380)
    Erich Leinsdorf, Vol. IV; Idil Biret - debut (St Laurent Studio YSL T-380)

    $19.90Ariadne auf Naxos  (Scherman;  Eileen Farrell, Mattiwilda Dobbs, Jon Crain)  (St Laurent Studio YSL T-517)
    Ariadne auf Naxos (Scherman; Eileen Farrell, Mattiwilda Dobbs, Jon Crain) (St Laurent Studio YSL T-517)

    $19.90I Vespri Siciliani  (Levine;   Renata Scotto, Elvira, Ochman, Raimondi)  (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-677)
    I Vespri Siciliani (Levine; Renata Scotto, Elvira, Ochman, Raimondi) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-677)

    $39.95Arturo Toscanini (Beethoven 9th);   Bovy, Thorborg, Peerce, Pinza  (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1079)
    Arturo Toscanini (Beethoven 9th); Bovy, Thorborg, Peerce, Pinza (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1079)

    $39.90Rheingold  (Boulez;  Donald McIntyre, Zoltan Kelemen, Bengt Rundgren, Matti Salminen)   (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-590)
    Rheingold (Boulez; Donald McIntyre, Zoltan Kelemen, Bengt Rundgren, Matti Salminen) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-590)

    $39.90Gotterdammerung  (Boulez;  Jones, Thomas, Kelemen, Ridderbusch)  (4-St Laurent Studio YSL T-723)
    Gotterdammerung (Boulez; Jones, Thomas, Kelemen, Ridderbusch) (4-St Laurent Studio YSL T-723)

    $49.90Die Fledermaus  (Kozma;  Steber, Kullman, Munsel, Hayward, Novotna, Brownlee)   (2-St Laurent Studio T-647)
    Die Fledermaus (Kozma; Steber, Kullman, Munsel, Hayward, Novotna, Brownlee) (2-St Laurent Studio T-647)

    $39.95Zinka Milanov - Final Recital, plus Interview with William H. Wells   (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-648)
    Zinka Milanov - Final Recital, plus Interview with William H. Wells (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-648)

    $39.90Gianna Pederzini;  Renato Zanelli     (2-St. Laurent Studio 78-522)
    Gianna Pederzini; Renato Zanelli (2-St. Laurent Studio 78-522)

    $39.90Madama Butterfly  (Patane;  Scotto, Aragall, Edwards)  (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-658)
    Madama Butterfly (Patane; Scotto, Aragall, Edwards) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-658)

    $39.95Das Lied von der Erde  (Rodzinski;  Thorborg & Kullman)  (3-Immortal Performances IPCD-1090)
    Das Lied von der Erde (Rodzinski; Thorborg & Kullman) (3-Immortal Performances IPCD-1090)

    $39.90Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. II  -  Haydn, Mahler & Webern     (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-542)
    Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. II - Haydn, Mahler & Webern (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-542)

    $29.90William Steinberg, Vol. V;   Tristan und Isolde (Eileen Farrell, James King, Nell Rankin)  (St Laurent Studio YSL T-544)
    William Steinberg, Vol. V; Tristan und Isolde (Eileen Farrell, James King, Nell Rankin) (St Laurent Studio YSL T-544)

    $19.90Fritz Reiner - Schubert, Delius & Tschaikowsky  (St Laurent Studio YSL T-607)
    Fritz Reiner - Schubert, Delius & Tschaikowsky (St Laurent Studio YSL T-607)

    $19.90Siegfried  (Boulez;  McIntyre, Jones, Kollo, Kelemen, Zednik, Rundgren)  (3-St Laurent Studio YSL T-670)
    Siegfried (Boulez; McIntyre, Jones, Kollo, Kelemen, Zednik, Rundgren) (3-St Laurent Studio YSL T-670)

    $49.90Falstaff   (Levine;   Taddei, Neblett, Cossotto, Blegen, Monk, Ahlstedt, Tajo)   (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-653)
    Falstaff (Levine; Taddei, Neblett, Cossotto, Blegen, Monk, Ahlstedt, Tajo) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-653)

    $39.95Tosca  (Adler;  Leontyne Price, Franco Corelli, Cornell MacNeil)  (2-St Laurent Studio T-681)
    Tosca (Adler; Leontyne Price, Franco Corelli, Cornell MacNeil) (2-St Laurent Studio T-681)

    $39.95Cosi Fan Tutte  (Cantelli;  Schwarzkopf, Merriman, Sciutti, Alva, Panerai)    (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1083)
    Cosi Fan Tutte (Cantelli; Schwarzkopf, Merriman, Sciutti, Alva, Panerai) (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1083)

    $39.90Marian Anderson, Vol. III       (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-629)
    Marian Anderson, Vol. III (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-629)

    $19.90Nozze (Panizza;  Rethberg, Albanese, Stevens, Pinza, Brownlee, Baccaloni)  (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1094)
    Nozze (Panizza; Rethberg, Albanese, Stevens, Pinza, Brownlee, Baccaloni) (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1094)

    $49.95Mignon / Carmen   (Swarthout, Vinay, Hackett, Albanese, Pinza)  (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1096)
    Mignon / Carmen (Swarthout, Vinay, Hackett, Albanese, Pinza) (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1096)

    $49.95Arturo Toscanini - Victor Records Restored  (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1087)
    Arturo Toscanini - Victor Records Restored (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1087)

    $49.90Walkure  (Boulez;  McIntyre, Hofmann, Jones, Bode, Salminen, Randova)  (3-St Laurent Studio YSL T-645)
    Walkure (Boulez; McIntyre, Hofmann, Jones, Bode, Salminen, Randova) (3-St Laurent Studio YSL T-645)

    $49.90Landmarks of Recorded Pianism, Vol. I  (Lipatti, Cortot, Novaes, Rosenthal, Horowitz, Niryeghazy)  (2-Marston 52073)
    Landmarks of Recorded Pianism, Vol. I (Lipatti, Cortot, Novaes, Rosenthal, Horowitz, Niryeghazy) (2-Marston 52073)

    $39.90Der Rosenkavalier  (Szell;  Jessner, Novotna, Conner, List)  (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1092)
    Der Rosenkavalier (Szell; Jessner, Novotna, Conner, List) (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1092)

    $49.95Otello  (1940 Performance)  (Panizza;  Martinelli,  Rethberg, Tibbett)  (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1070)
    Otello (1940 Performance) (Panizza; Martinelli, Rethberg, Tibbett) (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1070)

    $39.95Forza  (Stiedry;  Milanov, Tucker, Warren, Hines)  (2-St Laurent Studio T-679)
    Forza (Stiedry; Milanov, Tucker, Warren, Hines) (2-St Laurent Studio T-679)

    $39.95Missa Solemnis  (Toscanini;  Milanov, Thorborg, von Pataky, Moscona)  (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1086)
    Missa Solemnis (Toscanini; Milanov, Thorborg, von Pataky, Moscona) (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1086)

    $39.90La Navarraise;  Griselidis    (Moizan, Vanzo, Mollien, Roux, Mars)   (2-Malibran 813)
    La Navarraise; Griselidis (Moizan, Vanzo, Mollien, Roux, Mars) (2-Malibran 813)

    $29.90Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. VI - (Bruckner 4th - Boston)   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-695)
    Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. VI - (Bruckner 4th - Boston) (St Laurent Studio YSL T-695)

    $19.90Lener String Quartet, Vol. I   (Brahms)     (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-634)
    Lener String Quartet, Vol. I (Brahms) (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-634)

    $19.90Charles Rousseliere     (The Record Collector TRC 46)
    Charles Rousseliere (The Record Collector TRC 46)

    $19.90