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Historical Reissue Classical CDs, LPs, 78s,
Related Books & Ephemera
Since 1972

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Palaeophonics happily welcomes Spring with

Beatrice Lillie's CHEEP! from 1917;

Yves St Laurent offers

the legendary LAZARE-LEVY;

BRUNO MADERNA, Vol. 36

&

ARTUR RODZINSKI, Vol. 45;

many Books & CDs added to our 50% SALE



Auction #150 Is Now Closed ! ! !


Norbeck, Peters & Ford's Annual 78rpm Auction is now closed!

Norbeck, Peters & Ford's new 78rpm AUCTION #150 is now still online for your perusal
closing date is this Friday, 17 May.

To view the online version simply click the link below:

Auction #150 Online Catalog

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Auction #150 Catalog File Download

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We appreciate you taking the time to review our new auction. To place your bids and include us as a trusted source to compliment your collections.



This Week's Offerings:

  • LAZARE-LEVY: Beethoven, Mozart, Rameau, Faure & Lazare-Levy; LAZARE-LEVY acc. GEORGES JOUATTE (T): 4 Faure songs; LAZARE-LEVY, w. ULYSSE DELECLUSE, COURSIER, de SAMPIGNY, RAMPAL, OUBRADOUS, VIEUX, PIERLOT, BENEDETTI & MARECHAL: Clarinet Quintet in A, K.581 (Mozart); Divertissement (Roussel). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-806, recorded 1950-61, several live performances. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1304)

    “Lazare Levy, also hyphenated as Lazare-Levy was an influential French pianist, organist, composer and pedagogue. As a virtuoso pianist he toured throughout Europe, in North Africa, Israel, the Soviet Union and Japan. He taught for many years at the Paris Conservatoire.

    Lazare Levy was born of French parents in Brussels. He entered the Paris Conservatoire at age 12 in 1894. He studied under Louis Diemer, Andre Gedalge, and Albert Lavignac. His fellow musicians and friends included Jacques Thibaud, Alfredo Casella, Maurice Ravel, Alfred Cortot, George Enescu, and Pierre Monteux. In 1898, he was awarded a Premier Prix.

    He was conducted by Edouard Colonne at his debut recital at the age twenty. He played Schumann's a minor Piano Concerto at the Concerts Colonne. Camille Saint-Saens, who saw him at one of his early recitals, considered him to possess ‘that rare union of technical perfection and musicality’." Saint-Saens intentionally obtained a front row seat to show his support for the pianist.

    In 1911, he played Ibéria (Book I) of Albeniz, whom he admired. He also supported French composers Darius Milhaud and Paul Dukas early in their careers by playing their works. Having an interest in new music, he also championed the careers of several of his students.

    He co-wrote Methode Superieure for piano when he was 25. He became an assistant of Diemer, who published the piece. Beginning in 1914, he became a temporary teacher at the Paris Conservatoire. He became a professor in 1923 and taught there until 1953, except for the period during the war when the Germans had dismissed him because he was a Jew holding an official position. However, his position had been given to Marcel Ciampi and although he was reappointed in 1944, he did not get the same position after the war. He was a leading performer and influential teacher, along with Alfred Cortot, Isidor Philipp, and Marguerite Long."


  • - Wikipedia






  • CHEEP! (Harry Gratton, Clay Smith, etc.), recorded 1917, w.Arthur Grudge Cond. Mayfair Theatre Ensemble; Beatrice Lillie, Lee White, Teddie Gerard, Clay Smith, Walter Williams, etc. (England) Palaeophonics 133, w.Elaborate 'The Play' 20pp. Brochure replete with numerous photos of the Vaudeville Theatre 1917 production & biographies. Excellently transferred from the legendary Acoustic 78rpm English Columbia & HMV rarities. (PE0287)

    "In the light of later events, CHEEP! was the first time the sleek and urbane Beatrice Lillie appeared in her true colors as a comic genius of the first order!"


    - Noel Coward




    “Beatrice Lillie, who during a half-century theatrical career was often called ‘the funniest woman in the world’, who used a long cigarette holder to punctuate the barbed ripostes for which she was famous, was the widow of Sir Robert Peel. But she never took her official title Lady Peel seriously, and called her autobiography EVERY OTHER INCH A LADY.

    The very name Beatrice Lillie could evoke memories of mirth and merriment for the hundreds of thousands of people she entertained in theaters, movie houses, vaudeville palaces and supper clubs and on radio and television, over a period of more than 50 years.

    In Alexander Woollcott's estimation, Miss Lillie was ‘a comic genius’ with her trademark close-cropped hair and fezlike cap. She was, in fact, one of those rare entertainers whose talents and qualities are extremely difficult to measure and describe. One had to see her to believe her - or perhaps disbelieve her. She was a great clown who learned early how to ’play’ an audience. Because of that fact, it was often said that no two Lillie performances were ever the same. She explained that for most of her performances, when things went well, ‘the wand was on; something happened between myself and the audience, for they recognized something I'd known for years - I was a natural-born fool’.

    Anyone who ever saw her sketch about a slightly tipsy, tongue-tied Mrs. Blagdon turning Harrods department store in London into a state of havoc, would consider her an adorably nutty fool. In the sketch, Mrs. Blogg tried unsuccessfully to buy ‘two dozen double-damask dinner napkins’, a request that soon started coming off her thickened tongue as ‘two dazzle dimask dibble dimmer napples’, and so forth. In her sketches and songs, most of which were constructed to puncture the pompous, Miss Lillie could send her audiences into fits of laughter by merely lifting an eyebrow, twitching her nose as she spoke a certain phrase or turning her longish face into a rubbery U-shape with a somewhat equine smile. With great ease she seemed able to contort and mold that face into a thousand shapes. Often it was not precisely what she said or sang that garnered so many laughs, but the way she delivered the material. As the critic George Jean Nathan put it, ‘With one dart of her eyes, she can spare a skit writer a dozen lines’. Sir Noel, Miss Lillie's devoted friend and often the writer of her material, her director or her co-star, finally grew accustomed to her idiosyncrasies. ‘For an author-director to attempt to pin Beattie down to a meticulous delineation of character is a direct invitation to nervous collapse’, he said. Miss Lillie had a natural instinct for humor. One spring day, while she was serving tea to friends in her East End Avenue apartment in New York, a pigeon flew in the window and sat on the arm of a chair. Some of Miss Lillie's guests were startled, but she merely looked at the bird and asked, ‘Any messages?’

    Beatrice Gladys Lillie was born in Toronto on May 29, 1894. Her father, John Lillie, a native of Northern Ireland, had served with the British Army in India before he married Lucie Shaw, an Englishwoman. Beatrice had an older sister, Muriel.

    Mrs. Lillie, who enjoyed a modest reputation as a concert singer, had great expectations for her daughters - Muriel would be a concert pianist, Beatrice a soprano - and their musical training began early.

    The Lillie Trio - Mrs. Lillie, Beatrice and Muriel - entertained at local soirees and did a bit of touring, but Beatrice was showing signs of being an undisciplined soprano. The trouble was that she had discovered early the pleasures of making people laugh while she sang. At 8 years of age, she was thrown out of a church choir for making funny gestures and flopping her fan about during serious moments, causing small boys to giggle uncontrollably. At 15, Miss Lillie ended what had been at best a mere pass at a formal education, and sailed for England, where her mother had taken Muriel to study music. Her first stage appearance, which ran a week, was as a male impersonator, a role she was to play off and on, in top hat and tails, for several years. ‘I was the best-dressed transvestite in the world’, Miss Lillie said. In 1914, she was hired for a minor role in NOT LIKELY, produced by Andre Charlot, a Frenchman who had brought to London with great success the concept of the little revue of fast-paced, sophisticated songs, skits and blackouts. With her slim build and her hair cropped in the latest fashion, she was often cast in male roles due to the fact that so many men were being called to war. During her time on the London stage, she crafted her unique comedic style as well as one of her trademarks: twirling a long string of pearls. Beatrice needed to work in front of an audience because it provided her with immediate feedback and could allow her the latitude to improvise as the mood of the audience suited. This did not always amuse the other actors or the producers, prompting Andre Charlot to post a note backstage after one of her improvisations: 'Beatrice Lillie Fined Five Shillings for Trying to be Funny'.

    The young, bubbling Miss Lillie was besieged by hordes of stage-door Johnnies. The one who won her was the handsome Robert Peel, whose ancestor Sir Robert Peel served as one of Queen Victoria's Prime Ministers and organized London's Metropolitan police force. Its members were nicknamed ‘bobbies’ after him. Miss Lillie was married to the future Sir Robert Peel at his family's estate, Drayton Manor, in 1920, but the bridegroom's parents stayed away, disapproving of ‘theatrical folk’. The couple's only child, also named Robert and called Little Bobbie, was born a year later. A few months afterward, a bored Beatrice Lillie returned to the stage in Charlot's revue NOW AND THEN. Miss Lillie's insistence on not giving up her career was dictated in part by economic necessity. Her husband was virtually penniless, a man who was never able to hold down a job and a gambler as well. ‘It was fortunate that I could trek back and forth across the Atlantic, earning a living for my son and husband’, Miss Lillie said. The couple grew apart, and Sir Robert died of peritonitis at the age of 36, in 1934, in the home of his mistress.

    Miss Lillie's private world was shattered in 1942 when her son who had enlisted in the Royal Navy was killed in a Japanese air raid on the port of Colombo, Ceylon. Miss Lillie spent much of the war entertaining troops in the Mediterranean region, Africa, the Middle East and, later, in Germany. Over the years, she appeared in at least one revue a year, and sometimes two or three. Among them was THIS YEAR OF GRACE in 1928, written by and co-starring Sir Noel. One of Miss Lillie's most famous songs was ‘Mad Dogs and Englishmen’, introduced in her THIRD LITTLE SHOW on Broadway in 1931. It became a standard in her repertory as well as in Sir Noel's.

    In her 1972 autobiography, Miss Lillie told how another of her standards, ‘There Are Fairies in the Bottom of My Garden’, was introduced, against her will, into her repertory. Her friend Ethel Barrymore thought the song was a lovely, serious one, but Miss Lillie made it a side-splitter, especially when she sang it garbed in a long formal gown, then raised her skirt and roller-skated off stage.

    She toured the United States many times, in AN EVENING WITH BEATRICE LILLIE, INSIDE U.S.A., and half a dozen other shows. Her friends were fond of telling the story about the time Miss Lillie and several chorus girls went to a beauty parlor in Chicago to have their hair done before an opening. An heiress to a meatpacking empire came in and informed the beauty salon's proprietor that she was ‘mortified and infuriated to learn this establishment has been taken over by showgirls’. As Miss Lillie left her booth, she loudly told the salon proprietor, in her most proper and meticulously enunciated English: ‘You may tell the butcher's daughter that Lady Peel is finished’, and she sailed out.

    Beatrice Lillie was an original, but one who never took herself seriously. Once a reporter asked ‘Miss Lillie what lies at the bottom of your art?’ ‘There are fairies at the bottom of my art’, she answered.”


  • - Albin Krebs, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 21 Jan., 1989






  • BRUNO MADERNA Cond. Stuttgart Radio S.O.: Symphony #2 in C (Schumann), Live Performance, 25 June, 1970, Saarbrucken; BRUNO MADERNA Cond. RAI S.O., Roma, w. Salvatore Accardo & Siegfried Palm: Double Concerto in a (Brahms), Live Performance, 28 Jan., 1961. [Maderna's heavenly Schumann performance palpitates with emotion - a beautiful experience!] (Canada) St Laurent Studio T-784. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1707)

    “Salvatore Accardo is an outstanding Italian violin virtuoso, best known as a master of the works of Niccolo Paganini, but equally accomplished across a wide variety of repertory for the instrument. His playing is characterized by a taut, visceral tone and a disciplined musical approach that avoids self-indulgence. Having also established himself as a successful conductor, chamber musician, and teacher, Accardo may be considered one of the most accomplished and influential musicians of his generation.

    Accardo was born in the northern Italian town of Turin, but as a teenager he went to Naples to study violin at the Conservatorio di San Pietro a Majella; it was there, at the age of 13, that he gave his first performance of the devilish Caprices of Paganini, beginning a lifelong association with that music. He later studied in Siena, at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana. After winning the 1956 Geneva Competition and the 1958 Paganini Competition in Genoa, Accardo began a performing career that has kept him busy ever since, both as a soloist with major orchestras and as a recitalist. His repertory includes all of the violin music of Paganini, the solo partitas of J.S. Bach, virtually every mainstream violin concerto from the Classical, Romantic, and Modern eras, and a number of contemporary works. Works composed specifically for Accardo include Walter Piston's Fantasia for violin and orchestra, Iannis Xenakis' ‘Dikhthas’, and Franco Donatoni's ‘Argot’. The most notable entries in Accardo's extensive discography include his complete cycle of Paganini concertos (the first of its kind), Max Bruch's complete music for violin and orchestra, and the complete sonatas and partitas of Bach.

    In 1968, he founded the Italian Chamber Orchestra and became its first conductor. He later conducted the ensemble I Musici, and in 1994 he was appointed conductor of the Orchestra del Teatro San Carlo in Naples. He is a founding member of the Accardo String Quartet and of the Walter Stauffer Academy, where he routinely gives master classes, and also of the Cremona Academy for string players. In 1987, he published a book, L'ARTE DEL VIOLINO.”


    - Allen Schrott, allmusic.com




    “Siegfried Palm made his name as a cellist who could play anything put in front of him. He never argued with composers or tried to make them simplify technical challenges, but considered it his duty to present their original vision in as intact a form as possible. In the process, he greatly advanced modern cello technique. Palm attended Enrico Mainardi's master class from 1950 to 1953, following the teacher to Wurzburg, Salzburg, Lucerne and Rome. Palm credited Mainardi with making him think about music, encouraging him to read books and giving him a love for the composer Max Reger, while his quartet leader, Bernard Hamann, influenced his taste - the ensemble was the first in Europe since the Kolisch to play all the music of the Second Viennese school. Palm named Schmidt-Isserstedt alongside his father as his major influence – he moved from Hamburg to Cologne as principal of the radio orchestra and professor at the Staatliche Hochschule fur Musik. In 1972, he was appointed its director.

    Palm won both the German Schallplattenpreis and the Grand Prix du Disque twice. His most recent important recording was the Ligeti concerto, dedicated to him, which he did (for the second time) with undimmed mastery for the Ligeti Edition.

    But Palm was far from being an avant-garde specialist. At the Marlboro summer school in Vermont, in which he participated nine times from 1970 to 1990, he happily prepared and took part in performances of Mozart, Devienne, Krommer, Beethoven, Schumann, Brahms, Dvorak, Verdi and Saint-Saens, as well as the more expected Hindemith, Ives, Copland, Webern, Kodaly, Reger, Rorem, Stravinsky, Shostakovich, Kagel, Kirchner, Messiaen and Adolf Busch.”


  • - Tully Potter, THE GUARDIAN, 20 June, 2005






  • ARTUR RODZINSKI Cond. NBC S.O.: Bach, Schreker, Dohnanyi & Johann Strauss. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL 78-596, Live Performances, 2 & 16 April, 1938. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1708)

    "Although Rodzinski conducted most of the Country's major orchestras, his tenure often ended in a huff. In 1947 he had quit the coveted job of boss of the New York Philharmonic because, he said, he felt hemmed in and hampered by the Philharmonic's businesslike manager.

    Rodzinski was known as a great builder of orchestras. Time and again he took over run-down orchestras and in a few years, by cajolery, psychology and almost ruthless dedication, built them into the finest of artistic groups."


    - LOS ANGELES TIMES, 28 Nov., 1958




    “Artur Rodzinski, a conductor of incandescent talent and an equally brilliant gift for self‐destruction, cut a scandalous path through American music a generation ago. Along with Toscanini and Stokowski, the bushyhaired Polish musician summed up in the public's eyes all that a real maestro was supposed to be: preening, arbitrary, dictatorial, unpredictable, driven by ambition. Rodzinski was all these, as his widow Halina freely documents in her fascinating memoirs. And more: Rodzinski during significant portions of his career was mentally ill, dependent on drugs and in thrall to all sorts of spiritual fads and fancies. That a man as disturbed as Rodzinski could operate, often dazzlingly well, during his relatively untroubled moments is perhaps a tribute to the stability of the domestic life he had built around himself. Mrs. Rodzinski, in the way wives of great men once were expected to act, put her life entirely at the disposal of her master.

    Both Rodzinski and his wife came from a culture and a time (Poland before World War II) when such an arrangement was accepted as normal. 'I come before everything and everyone else', Rodzinski told Halina before their wedding, and he left her in no doubt of it by thereupon spending his wedding night without her, on the town. His wife, with less outward resentment than one would expect, depicts herself as hardly more than a servant. She sharpened his pencils, changed his shirts and brushed his hair at intermissions. Oh, yes, and it was her duty, too, to lay out the loaded revolver along with the maestro's tails before a concert. This bizarre story, which has long been talked about in disbelief In the orchestra world, can now be certified as true. Rodzinski carried the weapon - loaded - in a hip pocket whenever he faced an orchestra, even during rehearsals. Learning of this later, many a player who had displeased Rodzinski at one time or another must have experienced a slight frisson.”


  • - Donal Henahan, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 23 May, 1976








    . . . REPEATED . . . FROM THE RECENT PAST . . .








  • JORGE BOLET: Sonata #31 in A-flat, Op.110 (Beethoven); Transcendental Etudes (Liszt); Le Cygne (Saint-Saens); Schubert-Liszt), Mendelssohn & Verdi-Liszt). [A magnificent recital recorded in brilliant sound; the Op.110 Beethoven is magesterial!] Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-756, Live Performance, 11 Oct., 1970, Bloomington, Indiana. (P1302)

    “This is an extraordinary addition to the Jorge Bolet discography…. Bolet most admired pianists from a bygone era who exhibited extraordinary interpretive freedom and flair, pianists like Sergei Rachmaninoff and Josef Hofmann. While one would not sense this affinity from most of Bolet’s studio recordings, it is clearly evident when one hears his live recordings. At his best, Bolet managed to balance an improvisatory freedom that gave the impression of music being made up on the spot with a sense of architecture and structure that prevented him from distorting the music’s shape more than it could take.

    The present recital from Indiana University in 1970 captures Bolet at his best and also demonstrates the remarkable scope of his artistic sensibilities. His performance of Beethoven’s Op. 110 (what a work to choose for the opening of a recital!) conveys the excitement of virtuosity integral to the second movement and parts of the finale, while at the same time probing very deeply into the spiritual content of the Adagio, ma non troppo. His singing tone emphasizes the marking Moderato cantabile molto espressivo of the first movement. In fact, cantabile is one of the consistent features of this recital, running through the Liszt etudes and transcriptions and everything else.

    Bolet plays with a wide range of color, consistent beauty of tone, and an ability to clarify complex textures without ever sounding fussy. The fugal voices in the Beethoven are perfectly clarified, and later we get a vivid sense of all four singers in the RIGOLETTO Quartet that is the basis of Liszt’s Paraphrase.

    [In] the twelve Transcendental Etudes…Bolet creates a highly dramatic theatrical conclusion. His ability to balance the theatrically extravagant and the introspective elements of these etudes makes this a very special recording, comparable with the best….

    The remainder of the recital, an unusually generous one at 108 minutes, is similarly successful. Godowsky’s transcription of Saint-Saëns’s ‘Swan’ from CARNIVAL OF THE ANIMALS is played with rippling notes that show no evidence of their technical difficulty. At the same time, Bolet’s lyrical shaping of the melody is what one might expect from a singer of bel canto. The Mendelssohn gives us a similar bel canto-like line in the Andante and then recalls the fairies of A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM in the Rondo capriccio. The trick in Liszt’s transcription of Schubert’s ‘Die Forelle’ is to balance clarity in the melody amidst all of the keyboard trickery with which Liszt surrounded it while not hiding that trickery. Bolet, as you might expect, achieves this as well as I have ever heard.

    The monaural sound is natural, with the piano neither too close to nor too far from the microphones. St. Laurent Studio recordings, available from Norbeck, Peters & Ford, provide no program notes but do have complete information about the contents and track listing. Most importantly, the company chooses material with a keen eye to preserving the legacy of important artists. Their service in this regard is to be admired with gratitude.”


  • - Henry Fogel, FANFARE






  • LA GIOCONDA, Live Performance, 3 Jan., 1953, w.Cleva Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Zinka Milanov, Kurt Baum, Fedora Barbieri, Leonard Warren, Cesare Siepi, Jean Madeira, etc.) (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-684. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (OP3305)

    “Ready and willing, [Milanov] offers what is perhaps the most emotional, fully committed performance of her long broadcast career….As Milanov fills Ponchielli’s churning lines with splendid arcs of sound, the heroine’s pain and sorrow are fully exposed - the soprano, too, has opened her heart to us. One expects Milanov to soar grandly over the third-act choral mass, but more welcome is the wide dynamic range of her singing, especially in the final act….’Suicidio’ is a flamboyant example of her art. As seems appropriate to the theatre, the reading is more expansive than in her celebrated recording….in the abandon of her portrayal she flirts with danger throughout the afternoon….Milanov and Gioconda are one….Gioconda looms as the ultimate image of her stage persona and vocal manner.”


  • - Paul Jackson, SIGN-OFF FOR THE OLD MET, p.153






  • IL TROVATORE, Live Performance, 16 Jan., 1954, w.Cleva Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Zinka Milanov, Kurt Baum, Elena Nikolaidi, Leonard Warren, Nicola Moscona, etc.) (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-686. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (OP3306)

    “I will say emphatically that Milanov's Leonora in TROVATORE, among other roles she sang splendidly, was the peer of any soprano's in my experience. (Yes, my own included.....Milanov's was an amazingly beautiful voice.…In the end, she earned a place in operatic history and it was an Olympian one.”


  • - Rosa Ponselle






  • KLAUS TENNSTEDT Cond. Minnesota Orchestra: Symphony #8 in c (Bruckner), Live Performance, 1 Nov., 1989 [albeit with 2 very brief minor static intrusions]; KLAUS TENNSTEDT Cond. London Phil.: 'Unfinished' Symphony #8 in b (Schubert), Live Performance, 4 Nov., 1984; Don Juan (Strauss), Live Performance, 23 Oct., 1988. (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-817. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1705)

    “Tennstedt's Bruckner is something magical, even transcendental. His sympathy with Bruckner's sprawling spiritual visions, and his ability to communicate all the halting-steps progress of the journey from doubt to reaffirmation that is at the core of all of Bruckner's music, can be awe-inspiring.”


  • - Thor Eckert Jr., CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR






  • JEAN MARTINON Cond. Chicago Orchestra, w. Steven Staryk, Adolph Herseth, Ray Still, Donald Peck & Joane Bennett: Brandenburg Concerto #2 in F; w. Maria Stader: 'Wedding Cantata' Weichert nur, betrubte Schatten - Live Performance, 2 June, 1966 [Sterling, breathtaking performances in the superb Orchestra Hall acoustic]; JEAN MARTINON Cond. ORTF S.O.: Die Kunst der Fuge - Live Performance, 14 Jan., 1970, Theatre des Champs Elysees, Paris (all Bach). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-623. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1704)





  • JEAN MARTINON Cond. Chicago Orchestra: Images (Debussy), Live Performance, 19 Jan., 1967; w. ZINO FRANCESCATTI: Tzigane (Ravel), Live Performance, 17 March, 1966; w. MAUREEN FORRESTER: Poeme de l'amour et de la mer (Chausson), Live Performance, 8 Feb., 1968, all Orchestra Hall. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-505. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1479)





  • PAUL PARAY Cond. Detroit S.O.: Beethoven, Reger & Schumann (incl. the latter's Symphony #4 in d). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-646, Live Performances, 1960, 1961 & 1962. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1697)

    "This is no less than Volume 19 that Yves St.-Laurent has devoted to the worthy cause of the art of Paul Paray, whose famed Mercury recordings with the Detroit Symphony from 1953-62 set such high and enduring standards, particularly in but not limited to French repertoire. Here we have assembled an all-German program instead, which displays the conductor’s skills in this repertoire most felicitously. In the Beethoven and Schumann works, the tempos are brisk - indeed, blazingly fast in the main section of the Leonore Overture #3 - the rhythms and phrases precisely pointed, and the textures transparent. The results are always exhilarating, never merely breathless. Paray also has a keen understanding of how to structure drama, how to build and release tension, as demonstrated for example at the close of the Manfred Overture, where he not only decreases the tempo but also lowers the dynamics almost to a whisper, artfully depicting the protagonist’s final descent into despair and death. The result is even more striking than in his otherwise similar studio recording. Textual transparency is also a key feature of the Reger Variations, something which (most thankfully) alleviates that composer’s tendency toward logy density and opaqueness. While the Reger still remains on the fringes of the orchestral repertoire (being one of his few orchestral works to maintain even a marginal foothold there), this performance makes as strong a case for it as any.

    The Schumann Fourth receives a particularly bracing reading, and one in which the contrasts to Paray’s 1953 commercial recording are particularly notable. Even though the timings of both the Symphony as a whole, and of all four movements individually, the live performance is less uniformly linear and more plastic in its shaping. Here the slow introduction to the first movement, already more of a moderato in the studio version, is a shade quicker yet; the main section has a positively febrile, nervous energy, but with an unexpected contrast of a slower tempo for the reprise of the main theme in the recapitulation. The Romanze has a subtle additional bloom created by taking the opening oboe solo a tad more slowly, and them imparting a touch more motion to the following string figures, while the concertmaster in his violin solo has more sweetness of tone here. The Scherzo likewise is more songful though hardly any less dramatic, helped by a better balanced recording in which the timpani strokes are properly undergirding punctuation instead of more overbearing cannon-shots. The trio section ripples along like a delicious spring breeze, and the transitions between it and the main sections are made more seamlessly. While the finales (including the prefatory transitions to the same) are similar overall, the live account injects occasional and unexpected moments of rubato (e.g., at about the 4:30 mark) that vary the texture a bit more. Especially given that the studio recording suffers from disagreeably harsh and sometimes murky sound (a rare failure by Mercury), this live performance is clearly preferable, sonically as well as interpretively.

    The recorded sound throughout is fairly clear mono. (Yves St.-Laurent’s sound reprocessing philosophy is one of minimal intervention.) As usual, a basic tray card with archival photos is provided, along with tracks and timings, but no notes. Between the two superb performances of the Schumann works that are superior to their earlier studio counterparts, and the addition of two novelties to the Paray discography (the Beethoven and Reger pieces) in crackerjack performances, this disc warrants an urgent recommendation to all fans of Paray, and the attention of collectors of historic concert recordings in general."


  • - James A. Altena, FANFARE






  • YEVGENY MRAVINSKY Cond. Leningrad Phil.: Symphony #9 in d [Original Edition] (Bruckner). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-787, Live Performance, 28 Feb., 1968, Great Hall of the Leningrad Conservatory. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1703)





  • LOLA BOBESCO, w.Daniel Sternefeld Cond. Belgian National Orch.: Violin Concerto in e (Lodewijk de Vocht), Live Performance, 13 May, 1949; w. Hans Muller-Kray Cond. SWR S.O.: Violin Concerto in D (Beethoven), recorded 10 June, 1960. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-809. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0742)





  • CARMEN, Live Performance, 13 Dec., 1975, w.Henry Lewis Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Regine Crespin, William Lewis, Katia Ricciarelli, Jose van Dam, Andrea Velis, etc. [Beyond this fabulous performance, Crespin's spoken dialogue is positively delicious! In every respect, Crespin was a great Carmen - among the two or three most remarkable performances in our memory!] (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-715. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (OP3304)

    "[Crespin] was surely one of the greatest French singers of the 20th Century; in fact, one of the great singers on records, one whose art goes well beyond the merely vocal. Beyond its size, [her voice] had a beautiful shimmer about it, a glowing quality present in all registers."


  • - Henry Fogel, FANFARE, March/April, 2005






  • FAUST (Schumann) – Scenes - ERICH LEINSDORF Cond. Boston Symphony Orch., w.Charles Bressler, Beverly Sills, Hermann Prey, Thomas Paul, Florence Kopleff, Tatiana Troyanos, Batyah Godfrey & Veronica Tyler. [An outstanding, beautiful performance in the customary radiant sound displaying the refreshing acoustics of Symphony Hall!] (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-739, Live Performance, 26 Feb., 1966, Symphony Hall, Boston. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1698)







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    BOOKS ON SALE





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    “Books have become our lonely stepchildren! By spending so many hours constantly revising our thousands of CDs we realize we have paid scant attention to our BOOKS ON SALE, thus many have been added (with more appearing), accompanied by greatly reduced prices! Have a glance at our SALE section - for BOOKS!









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    SMARTER THAN BOTH OF US ! ! !
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    We are grateful to so many of our readers who continue to note that our once-regular use of accent marks have become rather erratic. Due to the ever-growing popular use of ‘Smart’ Phones, Google automatically and frequently is restricting such marks, as well as that which we consider regular punctuation. In compliance with Google’s restrictive demands, as well as the fact that such complicated listings will require too long a period during which to download, or may not succeed in downloading at all, most of our newer listings are deleting such marks, much to our sense of loss. While our older listings so far retain such marks, we are informed that it won’t be long before they too automatically will be amended. We certainly take pride in our presentation, but are being compelled to adapt to another loss of style in these fast-paced times! We very sincerely appreciate so many of your valued comments and commiseration!!!





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    . . . numerous out-of-print CDs and LPs,

    [many sealed copies of numerous out-of-print

    additions: The Record Collector, Naxos, VRCS,

    Issues of Symposium's Harold Wayne series,

    Romophone, GOP & many Met Opera

    broadcasts & operas from Moscow’s Aquarius, plus

    numerous lesser-known operas have been added

    throughout our listings, in appropriate categories . . .

    out-of-print books [many biographies,

    Record Catalogue-Discographies . . .

    numerous CDs are added each week] . . .





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    Our 50% Discount Sale continues,

    now offering more than 2500 titles . . .





    ------------------ ANNOUNCEMENT -----------------



    Norbeck, Peters & Ford's Annual 78rpm Auction Has Now Closed!

    This auction featured an entire section of which is dedicated to 7" discs, plus many wonderful instrumental and vocal rarities, many of which we're offering for the first time in our 45 years of operation.

    You can still view the online version simply click the link below:

    Auction #149 Online Catalog

    To download a copy of Auction #149, simply click the link below:

    Auction #149 Catalog File Download

    For the recently-offered Archipel, Myto, Gebhardt, Walhall, Melodiya, Vista Vera & Living Stage titles on sale, simply visit our sale section of our website). This is the ideal opportunity at bargain prices to fill in gaps in one's collection.

    . . . For the Opus Kura,

    Archipel, Myto, Walhall, Gebhardt &

    Living Stage titles on sale,

    simply visit our

    sale section of our website . . .



    Once again . . .

    Welcome to our new bookshop & list of Original Cast LPs, www.norpete.com where you will see a vast array of excellent, used out-of-print books. You're sure to find many books of interest which may have long eluded you, so now is your opportunity to fill in missing gaps. Our online bookshop includes composer and performer autobiographies and biographies. Soon we will include musical criticism, theory and history, plus histories of symphony orchestras, opera houses and festivals. In addition, we shall offer quite an array of vocal scores, many of which are most rare and unusual.

    Take a look at our exciting array of Broadway & Off-Broadway Original Cast and London Original Cast LPs, all in superb condition.

    We continue to offer FREE Shipping on all U.S. orders over $49.00. If you would like to join our emailing list, please sign up at the top right.

    We carry splendid CD offerings from Yves St Laurent, VRCS, The Record Collector, Marston, Palaeophonics, Immortal Performances (Canada), Malibran, Aquarius, Truesound Transfers, Walhall, Bongiovanni, Clama and many other labels.

    As always, please contact us with any special requests.

    Please remember that we can take your order over the telephone from 10:00am to 6:00pm (EST), thereby providing you with the most current status of your order. Should you order by email or shopping cart and do not receive a timely acknowledgement of your order, please telephone.

    Thank you again for your loyal support, and happy browsing our ever changing website and exciting offerings.

  • Lazare-Levy;  Delecluse, Benedetti, Marechal, Oubradous, Rampal, etc. (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-806)
    P1304. LAZARE-LÉVY: Beethoven, Mozart, Rameau, Fauré & Lazare-Lévy; LAZARE-LÉVY acc. GEORGES JOUATTE (T): 4 Fauré songs; LAZARE-LÉVY, w. ULYSSE DELÉCLUSE, COURSIER, de SAMPIGNY, RAMPAL, OUBRADOUS, VIEUX, PIERLOT, BENEDETTI & MARÉCHAL: Clarinet Quintet in A, K.581 (Mozart); Divertissement (Roussel). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-806, recorded 1950-61, several live performances. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $29.90
    Cheep!  (Beatrice  Lillie, Lee White, Teddie Gerard)  (Palaeophonics 133)
    PE0287. CHEEP! (Harry Gratton, Clay Smith, etc.), recorded 1917, w.Arthur Grudge Cond. Mayfair Theatre Ensemble; Beatrice Lillie, Lee White, Teddie Gerard, Clay Smith, Walter Williams, etc. (England) Palaeophonics 133, w.Elaborate 'The Play' 20pp. Brochure replete with numerous photos of the Vaudeville Theatre 1917 production & biographies. Excellently transferred from the legendary Acoustic 78rpm English Columbia & HMV rarities.
    $19.90
    Bruno Maderna, Vol. XXXVI;  Salvatore Accardo & Siegfried Palm   (St Laurent Studio T-784)
    C1707. BRUNO MADERNA Cond. Stuttgart Radio S.O.: Symphony #2 in C (Schumann), Live Performance, 25 June, 1970, Saarbrücken; BRUNO MADERNA Cond. RAI S.O., Roma, w. Salvatore Accardo & Siegfried Palm: Double Concerto in a (Brahms), Live Performance, 28 Jan., 1961. [Maderna's heavenly Schumann performance palpitates with warmth - a beautiful experience!] (Canada) St Laurent Studio T-784. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $19.90
    Artur Rodzinski, Vol. LXV   (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-596)
    C1708. ARTUR RODZINSKI Cond. NBC S.O.: Bach, Schreker, Dohnanyi & Johann Strauss. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL 78-596, Live Performances, 2 & 16 April, 1938. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $19.90
    Show Bestsellers
    BESTSELLERS

    Fritz Reiner - Schubert, Delius & Tschaikowsky  (St Laurent Studio YSL T-607)
    Fritz Reiner - Schubert, Delius & Tschaikowsky (St Laurent Studio YSL T-607)

    $19.90Fidelio  (Tennstedt;  Marton, Vickers, Mazura, Plishka)  (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-794)
    Fidelio (Tennstedt; Marton, Vickers, Mazura, Plishka) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-794)

    $39.95Faust  (Pelletier;  Richard Crooks, Helen Jepson, Richard Bonelli, Ezio Pinza)  (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1097)
    Faust (Pelletier; Richard Crooks, Helen Jepson, Richard Bonelli, Ezio Pinza) (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1097)

    $39.95Bruno Walter - Treasury of Little Known Broadcasts  (Steber, Tourel, Simoneau, Forrester)  (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1099)
    Bruno Walter - Treasury of Little Known Broadcasts (Steber, Tourel, Simoneau, Forrester) (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1099)

    $49.90Salome - Two Performances (Reiner;  Welitsch;  Krauss;  Cebotari)  (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1089)
    Salome - Two Performances (Reiner; Welitsch; Krauss; Cebotari) (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1089)

    $49.95Don Giovanni  (Bruno Walter;  Pinza, Rethberg, Lazzari, Dino Borgioli)  ( 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1091)
    Don Giovanni (Bruno Walter; Pinza, Rethberg, Lazzari, Dino Borgioli) ( 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1091)

    $49.90Elektra  (Christopher Keene;  Olivia Stapp, Natalie Costa, Chookasian, Crabb, Cross)  (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-762)
    Elektra (Christopher Keene; Olivia Stapp, Natalie Costa, Chookasian, Crabb, Cross) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-762)

    $29.90Vocal Record Collectors' Society  -  2017 Issue              (VRCS-2017)
    Vocal Record Collectors' Society - 2017 Issue (VRCS-2017)

    $19.90Sergei Rachmaninoff    (3-Marston 53022)
    Sergei Rachmaninoff (3-Marston 53022)

    $53.90Die Walkure  (Szell;  Bampton, Traubel, Melchior, Janssen, Thorborg, Kipnis)  (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1081)
    Die Walkure (Szell; Bampton, Traubel, Melchior, Janssen, Thorborg, Kipnis) (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1081)

    $49.95Samson et Dalila  (Jean Fournet;  Jon Vickers & Marilyn Horne)    (2-St Laurent Studio stereo YSL T-804)
    Samson et Dalila (Jean Fournet; Jon Vickers & Marilyn Horne) (2-St Laurent Studio stereo YSL T-804)

    $39.95Giuseppe Campanari     (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-728)
    Giuseppe Campanari (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-728)

    $19.90Falstaff  (Toscanini;  Stabile, Valdengo, Cloe Elmo, Dino Borgioli, Lazzari)  (5-Immortal Performances IPCD 1100)
    Falstaff (Toscanini; Stabile, Valdengo, Cloe Elmo, Dino Borgioli, Lazzari) (5-Immortal Performances IPCD 1100)

    $59.90Die Meistersinger  (Szell;  Janssen, Steber, Thorborg, Kullman, List, Harrell)  (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1088)
    Die Meistersinger (Szell; Janssen, Steber, Thorborg, Kullman, List, Harrell) (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1088)

    $49.95Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. XVIII   (Bruckner 8th -  Philadelphia);  Brendel    (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-789)
    Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. XVIII (Bruckner 8th - Philadelphia); Brendel (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-789)

    $29.90George Szell, Vol. VII;  Erica Morini;  Geza Anda   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-426)
    George Szell, Vol. VII; Erica Morini; Geza Anda (St Laurent Studio YSL T-426)

    $19.90The Complete Feodor Chaliapin   (13-Marston 51301)
    The Complete Feodor Chaliapin (13-Marston 51301)

    $174.90Tannhauser  (Leinsdorf; Melchior, Janssen, Flagstad, Thorborg, List, Harrell)  (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1101)
    Tannhauser (Leinsdorf; Melchior, Janssen, Flagstad, Thorborg, List, Harrell) (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1101)

    $49.95Gotterdammerung  (Boulez;  Jones, Thomas, Kelemen, Ridderbusch)  (4-St Laurent Studio YSL T-723)
    Gotterdammerung (Boulez; Jones, Thomas, Kelemen, Ridderbusch) (4-St Laurent Studio YSL T-723)

    $49.90Mario Lanza;  Licia Albanese; Elaine Malbin   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-746)
    Mario Lanza; Licia Albanese; Elaine Malbin (St Laurent Studio YSL T-746)

    $19.90Tosca  (Cleva;  Regine Crespin, Sandor Konya, Robert Merrill, Ezio Flagello)  (2-St Laurent Studio T-657)
    Tosca (Cleva; Regine Crespin, Sandor Konya, Robert Merrill, Ezio Flagello) (2-St Laurent Studio T-657)

    $39.95Das Lied von der Erde  (Rodzinski;  Thorborg & Kullman)  (3-Immortal Performances IPCD-1090)
    Das Lied von der Erde (Rodzinski; Thorborg & Kullman) (3-Immortal Performances IPCD-1090)

    $39.90St Matthew Passion - Charles Munch, Vol. XXIX;   Endich, Kopleff, Cuenod, Mack Harrell  (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-689)
    St Matthew Passion - Charles Munch, Vol. XXIX; Endich, Kopleff, Cuenod, Mack Harrell (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-689)

    $29.90Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. VIII;  Jules Eskin & Burton Fine    (St Laurent Studio YSL T-697)
    Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. VIII; Jules Eskin & Burton Fine (St Laurent Studio YSL T-697)

    $19.90Renata Scotto, Vol. III,  Philharmonic Hall, 1972;  Ryan Edwards  (St Laurent Studio YSL T-683)
    Renata Scotto, Vol. III, Philharmonic Hall, 1972; Ryan Edwards (St Laurent Studio YSL T-683)

    $19.90Mignon / Carmen   (Swarthout, Vinay, Hackett, Albanese, Pinza)  (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1096)
    Mignon / Carmen (Swarthout, Vinay, Hackett, Albanese, Pinza) (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1096)

    $49.95Sir Thomas Beecham - Concert in memory of Toscanini   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-765)
    Sir Thomas Beecham - Concert in memory of Toscanini (St Laurent Studio YSL T-765)

    $19.90Der Rosenkavalier  (Szell;  Jessner, Novotna, Conner, List)  (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1092)
    Der Rosenkavalier (Szell; Jessner, Novotna, Conner, List) (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1092)

    $49.95Nozze (Panizza;  Rethberg, Albanese, Stevens, Pinza, Brownlee, Baccaloni)  (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1094)
    Nozze (Panizza; Rethberg, Albanese, Stevens, Pinza, Brownlee, Baccaloni) (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1094)

    $49.95Tristan  (Leinsdorf;  Melchior, Traubel, Thorborg, Huehn, Kipnis)   (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1102)
    Tristan (Leinsdorf; Melchior, Traubel, Thorborg, Huehn, Kipnis) (3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1102)

    $49.95Peter Grimes  (Colin Davis;  Vickers, Amara, Evans, Madeira, Chookasian, Plishka   (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-720)
    Peter Grimes (Colin Davis; Vickers, Amara, Evans, Madeira, Chookasian, Plishka (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-720)

    $39.95Zinka Milanov - Final Recital, plus Interview with William H. Wells   (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-648)
    Zinka Milanov - Final Recital, plus Interview with William H. Wells (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-648)

    $39.90Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. I   (Bruckner 8th -  Boston)    (St Laurent Studio YSL T-332)
    Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. I (Bruckner 8th - Boston) (St Laurent Studio YSL T-332)

    $19.90Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. XI,  Alexis Weissenberg   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-731)
    Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. XI, Alexis Weissenberg (St Laurent Studio YSL T-731)

    $19.90Renata Scotto, Vol. I,  Hunter College, 1970;  John Wustman     (St Laurent Studio YSL T-665)
    Renata Scotto, Vol. I, Hunter College, 1970; John Wustman (St Laurent Studio YSL T-665)

    $19.90Zara Dolukhanova, Vol. II, Nina Svetlanova (Pf.) - Leningrad  (St Laurent Studio YSL T-719)
    Zara Dolukhanova, Vol. II, Nina Svetlanova (Pf.) - Leningrad (St Laurent Studio YSL T-719)

    $19.90Helge Rosvaenge;  Otto  Seyfert (Pf.), Vol. I - Carnegie Hall, 1963  (Yves St Laurent YSL T-763)
    Helge Rosvaenge; Otto Seyfert (Pf.), Vol. I - Carnegie Hall, 1963 (Yves St Laurent YSL T-763)

    $19.90Renata Scotto,  Vol. II, Carnegie Hall, 1969;  John Wustman   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-682)
    Renata Scotto, Vol. II, Carnegie Hall, 1969; John Wustman (St Laurent Studio YSL T-682)

    $19.90Arturo Toscanini - Beethoven - Novotna, Thorborg, Peerce, Moscona, Rubinstein   (10-Immortal Performances 1064 -1067)
    Arturo Toscanini - Beethoven - Novotna, Thorborg, Peerce, Moscona, Rubinstein (10-Immortal Performances 1064 -1067)

    $149.90Samson (Handel)  (Rudel;  Jon Vickers, Leona Mitchell, Kiri Te Kanawa, Paul Plishka) (2-St Laurent Studio T-795)
    Samson (Handel) (Rudel; Jon Vickers, Leona Mitchell, Kiri Te Kanawa, Paul Plishka) (2-St Laurent Studio T-795)

    $39.95Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. XVI;  Serkin, Silverstein & Eskin  (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-770)
    Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. XVI; Serkin, Silverstein & Eskin (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-770)

    $29.90Serge Koussevitzky, Vol. XI  - Sibelius & Henri Casadesus   (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-643)
    Serge Koussevitzky, Vol. XI - Sibelius & Henri Casadesus (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-643)

    $19.90Dimitri Mitropoulos, Vol. III;  Nathan Milstein   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-609)
    Dimitri Mitropoulos, Vol. III; Nathan Milstein (St Laurent Studio YSL T-609)

    $19.90Missa Solemnis - Schuricht;  Stader, Hoffgen, Dermota, Berry  (St Laurent Studio YSL T-511)
    Missa Solemnis - Schuricht; Stader, Hoffgen, Dermota, Berry (St Laurent Studio YSL T-511)

    $19.90Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. XVII  -  (Bruckner 8th - NDR S.O.)  (St Laurent Studio YSL T-776)
    Klaus Tennstedt, Vol. XVII - (Bruckner 8th - NDR S.O.) (St Laurent Studio YSL T-776)

    $19.90Gina Cigna;  Elmo, Stignani, Gigli, Merli, Pasero;  de Sabata    (Malibran 157)
    Gina Cigna; Elmo, Stignani, Gigli, Merli, Pasero; de Sabata (Malibran 157)

    $19.90Sidney Foster - Rediscovering an American Master  (7-Marston 56001)
    Sidney Foster - Rediscovering an American Master (7-Marston 56001)

    $71.90Il Trovatore  (Cleva;  Leontyne Price, Franco Corelli, Dalis, Sereni)  (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-650)
    Il Trovatore (Cleva; Leontyne Price, Franco Corelli, Dalis, Sereni) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-650)

    $39.95Madama Butterfly  (Patane;  Scotto, Aragall, Edwards)  (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-658)
    Madama Butterfly (Patane; Scotto, Aragall, Edwards) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-658)

    $39.95