J. B. Faure     (Henri de Curzon )
Item# B0943
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Product Description

J. B. Faure     (Henri de Curzon )
B0943. Henri de Curzon. J. B. Faure, 1830-1914: une gloire francaise de l'art lyrique. Paris, Librarie Fischbacher, 1923 (Original Edition). 183pp. Photos. (French Text) Softbound Excellent, uncut copy has various loose pages; certainly worthy of rebinding. Paris, Librarie Fischbacher, 1923 (Original Edition). 183pp. Incl.list of Faure's roles, Paris & London. Photos. (French Text) Softbound Excellent, uncut copy has various loose pages; certainly worthy of rebinding.

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES:

“Jean-Baptiste Faure was a celebrated French operatic baritone and an art collector of great significance. He also composed a number of classical songs. He entered the Paris Conservatory in 1851 and made his operatic début the following year at the Opéra-Comique, as Pygmalion in Victor Massé's GALATHÉE. He remained at the Opéra-Comique for over seven years, singing baritone roles such as Max in Adolphe Adam's LE CHALET and Michel in Thomas' LE CAÏD. During this time he also created the Marquis d'Erigny in Auber's MANON LESCAUT (1856) and Hoël in Meyerbeer's LE PARDON DE PLOËRMEL (1859; later known as DINORAH), among seven premieres at that house.

He made his début at the Royal Opera House, London, in 1860 as Hoël, and at the Paris Opéra in 1861. He would sing at the Opéra every season until 1869 and then again in 1872-76 and 1878. In addition, he continued to perform off and on in London until 1877 at venues such as Her Majesty's Theatre and the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.

He also made history by creating several important operatic roles written by such prominent composers as Giacomo Meyerbeer, Giuseppe Verdi and Ambroise Thomas. They included the leading baritone parts in L'AFRICAINE, DON CARLOS and HAMLET (in 1865, 1867, and 1868 respectively). His last stage appearances are recorded as taking place in Marseilles and Vichy in 1886.

The greatest of Faure's French heirs were the lyric bass Pol Plançon (1851-1914)—who modelled his vocal method directly on that of Faure—and Jean Lassalle (1847-1909), who succeeded Faure as principal baritone at the Paris Opéra. Both Plançon and Lassalle made a number of recordings during the early 1900s, and their cultivated performances for the gramophone preserve key elements of Faure's singing style and technique.”

Henri de Curzon was a French Historian and musicologist (1861 - 1942)