The Four Voices of Man   (Jerome Hines)    0-87910-099-0
Item# B1773
$29.90
Availability: Usually ships the same business day

Product Description

The Four Voices of Man   (Jerome Hines)    0-87910-099-0
B1772. Jerome Hines. The Four Voices of Man. New York, Limelight Editions, 1997. 227pp. Illus.; DJ. - 0-87910-099-0 9780879100995

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“In his first book since the enormously popular GREAT SINGERS ON GREAT SINGING, the distinguished Metropolitan Opera basso Jerome Hines here provides a wealth of new information and advice for all those who have embarked on - or plan to embark on - a serious singing career. From basic information on how the head and body combine to produce vocal sound, he goes on to analyze the ‘four voices’ encompassed by the singer's one voice, always explaining how through proper technique and training that voice can achieve its ultimate in power, grace and beauty. On another level, Mr. Hines guides the singer through the labyrinth of choosing the right teacher, shows how physical and emotional health and care of the body relate to the vocal apparatus and considers such diverse matters as stage fright, dealing with conductors and managers and that final challenge - facing the critics.

The American bass Jerome Hines had a long and distinguished career at the Metropolitan Opera singing a wide variety of rôles with true consistency of voice and style. He appeared with the company for more than 40 years from 1946. An imposing figure - he was 6ft 6in tall - he had a voluminous bass to match his stature.

His charismatic presence made him ideal for the many rôles demanding a big personality. It was thus hardly surprising that Sarastro in THE MAGIC FLUTE, Gounod's Méphistopheles, the high priest Ramfis in AÏDA, the Grand Inquisitor in DON CARLOS, Boris Godunov, and King Mark in TRISTAN UND ISOLDE were among his leading rôles.

Although always faithful to the Met, Hines made many forays abroad. In 1953, he undertook Nick Shadow, with Glyndebourne, at the Edinburgh festival, in the first British performances of Stravinsky's THE RAKE'S PROGRESS. That led to engagements in leading houses in Europe and south America, and eventually to Bayreuth, where he sang Gurnemanz, King Mark and Wotan (1958-63). In 1958, he made his La Scala début in the title part of Handel's HERCULES, and, in 1961, he first appeared at the San Carlo in Naples, in the title rôle of Boito's MEFISTOFELE. His Boris Godunov, at the Bolshoi in Moscow in 1962, was, by all accounts, a deeply impressive portrayal.

He was fortunate to arrive at the Met just as the opera house was in need of replacements for the great Ezio Pinza, who had decided to appear in SOUTH PACIFIC. Unlike his distinguished predecessor, Hines could also sing the German and Russian repertory, in addition to Italian and French. In all, his innate musicianship stood him in good stead. Most of his discs derived from live performances. They reveal a sterling voice, a refined style, consisting of a burnished tone, a fine line and exemplary diction, although he seems never to have have been a very profound interpreter.

Hines was both a deeply religious person and a good writer. He combined these qualities in his own opera, I AM THE WAY, a work about Jesus, performed, with Hines as the protagonist, at Philadelphia in 1969. The previous year, he had published his autobiography, THIS IS MY STORY, THIS IS MY SONG, but his most lasting volume was GREAT SINGERS ON GREAT SINGING (1982), in which he made discerning comments on the art of many colleagues.

Hines' later appearances befitted his advancing years: he was Arkel, the elderly grandfather in PELLÉAS ET MÉLISANDE (Rome, 1984), and the blind father in Mascagni's IRIS (Newark, 1989). His last stage appearance was as Sarastro, in New Orleans in 1998, when he was 77.”

- Alan Blyth, THE GUARDIAN, 13 Feb., 2003