Hermann Abendroth    (2-Tahra TAH 604/05)
Item# C0499
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Product Description

Hermann Abendroth    (2-Tahra TAH 604/05)
C0499. HERMANN ABENDROTH Cond. Berliner Rundfunkorchester:  Symphony #7 in E (Bruckner), Live Performance, 19 Feb., 1956;  Pathétique Symphony #6 in b (Tschaikowsky), Live Performance, 28 Nov., 1950;  Abendroth Cond. Leipziger Rundfunks S.O.:  Suite #3 – Theme and Variations (Tchaikowsky), recorded 20 March, 1951.  (France) 2-Tahra TAH 604/05. - 3504129060411

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"...[Abendroth] was a bright star in the constellation of German musicians. His recordings are less rare than little known, especially in the West. Though most are late, they are all in the old manner and warrant attention from anyone with an interest in musical traditions."

- David Radcliffe, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, Jan./Feb., 1996



"Perhaps not a household name except to followers of exceptional, tradition-oriented conductors, Hermann Abendroth was born in Frankfurt am Main in 1883, the year of Wagner 's death, and he studied in Munich, where one of his teachers was Felix Mottl, the legendary conductor and former pupil of Anton Bruckner. His artistic life centered around Cologne and Leipzig. After being conductor of the Cologne Gurzenich Orchestra from 1915 to 1934, he spent eleven years as conductor of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. He also directed the Cologne Conservatory and had a hand in forming the College of Music. His conducting was marked by his unpretentious objectivity, and this attitude corresponded with the way he pursued his career - straightforwardly and always thinking far ahead. He was an artist with roots to his home and his institution. Just months after World War II he was appointed musical director in Weimar, where he felt at home up to the time of his death in 1956. In 1949 he had also assumed the direction of the Leipzig Radio Symphony, and four years later of the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra. What all of his interpretations share is the sense of architecture and dramatic structure which always places the parts of a movement in the larger context. For Hermann Abendroth, interpreting meant performing a work to the best of one's knowledge, not distorting it whatever the cost with a reading of one's own."

- Zillah D. Akron



"Tahra is a tiny classical music record company based in rural France. It's run by Myriam Scherchen, daughter of Hermann Scherchen, who co-ran the music label Tahra, which released officially authorized historical recordings of conductors such as Scherchen, Furtwängler, Mengelberg and others, generally drawn from primary recorded sources. Tahra ceased business after the death of the co-principal of the label, René Trémine. And despite its small size, the label has won some of the classical music industry's most prestigious awards, outgunning many of the big multinational conglomerates that dominate classical music today. Tahra's records are historical recordings, often taken from 78s or tapes of decades-old radio broadcasts."

- Julian Crandall Hollick, NPR Music, 28 Aug., 2005