Charles Munch, Vol. XXVIII   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-616)
Item# C1660
$19.90
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Product Description

Charles Munch, Vol. XXVIII   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-616)
C1660. CHARLES MUNCH Cond. RDF S.O.: Symphony #5 in G - World Premiere) (Guy Ropartz); Symphonie Liturgique, French Premiere (Honegger); The Gambler - Suite (Prokofiev). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-616, Live Performance, 14 Nov., 1946, Theatre des Champs-Elysees, UNESCO concert. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“The Fifth Symphony by Ropartz was written amid the Nazi Occupation during the composer’s retirement to his native Breton village of Lanloup. Its first and second movements comprise a lively Allegro assai which launches with a real crash and an exuberant Presto romp. We then get a Ropartz hallmark Largo - a piece of really touching writing which, while holding onto its dignity, has a melancholy elegiac loveliness. This, the longest movement is carried by the strings but there are some notable noble statements from solo horn and woodwind. A brief Allegro moderato has the clean euphoric classical lines of Moeran’s Sinfonietta but with a Franckian-Breton accent.

The Fifth Symphony was given its first performance at a UNESCO concert on 14 November 1946 alongside Honegger’s Third Symphony. The conductor was Charles Munch who has also presided over a festival of Ropartz works in Occupied France in 1943."

- Rob Barnett, Musicweb-International.com





"It's difficult to articulate what makes Munch's conducting special - or indeed if there even is anything identifiably unique about it. A lesser talent would simply turn out generic, cookie-cutter performances; but Munch was anything but generic. He was one of the most musical of conductors; in so many of his performances, everything simply sounds 'right'. Certainly, his experience as an orchestral musician gave him a lot of practical insight into the mechanics of directing orchestra traffic. But a classic Munch interpretation never sounds calculated. Spontaneity was one of his hallmarks, sometimes to the surprise and discomfort of the musicians playing under him. From one night to the next, a Munch performance of the same piece might be very different, depending on his mood of the moment - yet it would always sound like Munch."

- Lawrence Hansen, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, Nov. /Dec., 2012





"When you played a concert with Charles Munch or attended one of his performances as a listener, it was not just a concert - It was an event. He never used the same palette twice. As a player, you had to give 110% of yourself, or be left out of the music."

-Vic Firth, percussionist, Boston Symphony Orchestra