Cylinders 0484 - 0665

Historical Reissue Classical CDs, LPs, 78s,
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Since 1972



Auction Number 145 ­- AUCTION Closing Date: Sunday, 22 December, 2013



Regarding AUCTION #145 (Closing Date: Sunday, 22 December, 2013), The Minimum Bid ("MB") is a guide which has been set in accordance with current market value, determined through constant monitoring of auction sales during recent years. In cases of extreme rarity, the actual realized price may far exceed the Minimum Bid, while in other cases an item may realize a price very close to the Minimum Bid, and, occasionally, the Minimum Bid itself. Please simply bid in accordance with whatever a given item means to you. If a bidder wins more than originally anticipated, we are most pleased to make any mutually comfortable arrangement for payment terms. Please inquire.

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Nos. 0484 – 0665 are choice Cylinders – always noted when in Original Box with Original Printed Box top:



0484. BESSIE ABOTT: Rigoletto – Caro nome. Edison 2-minute B 37, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0485. ADELINA AGOSTINELLI: Tosca – Vissi d’arte. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28137, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 45

“Adelina Agostinelli studied in Milan with Giuseppe Quiroli, whom she later married. Agostinelli made her début in Pavia, 1903, as Giordano’s Fedora. She appeared with success in South America, Russia, Spain, England and her native Italy and was on the roster of the Manhattan Opera, 1908-10. One New York press notice indicates that her rendering of the ‘Suicidio’ from LA GIOCONDA on a Manhattan Sunday night concert ‘kept her busy bowing in recognition to applause for three or four minutes’. At La Scala she was cast with Battistini in SIMON BOCCANEGRA and created for that house in 1911 the Marschallin in their first ROSENKAVALIER. Her career continued into the mid-1920s when she retired to Buenos Aires and taught.”


0486. BLANCHE ARRAL: Mignon – Je suis Titania. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28125, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 25

0487. BLANCHE ARRAL: Carmen – Je dis que rien ne m’épouvante. Edison 4-minute wax B 167, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0488. BLANCHE ARRAL: La véritable Manola (Bourgeois). Edison 4-minute 35006, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

“Blanche Arral was a Belgian coloratura soprano. She studied under Mathilde Marchesi in Paris. She débuted in a small part in the 1884 world première of Jules Massenet’s MANON. Arral performed in various opera houses in Brussels, Paris and St. Petersburg before moving to the United States. In October 1909 she débuted at Carnegie Hall and joined the Metropolitan Opera for the 1909-1910 season.”


0489. PIERRE A. ASSELIN: Mireille – Ange du Paradis. Edison 4-minute Purple Amberol 29061. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 30

0490. PIERRE A. ASSELIN: Le Cid – Ô Souverain, ô juge, ô père. Edison 4-minute Purple Amberol 29047. MB 30

0491. PIERRE A. ASSELIN: Mignon – Elle ne croyait pas. Edison 4-minute Purple Amberol 29010. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 30

0492. PIERRE A. ASSELIN: Roméo – Ah, lève-toi, soleil. Edison 4-minute Purple Amberol 29055. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 30

“Starting in November 1918, Canadian tenor Pierre Asselin made recordings for the Edison recording label. His recordings were released in several formats, including Royal Purple Grand Opera Cylinder Records 29000 series, the Blue Amberol 27000 cylinder series and the Edison Diamonds 74000 series of disks. Through Edison, Asselin released a variety of recordings of arias and other serious classical works. Asselin continued recording with Edison until December 1920. In May 1921, Asselin resigned with Columbia Records. Asselin made his last recording for Brunswick, in 1929.”


0493. PAUL AUMONIER: Le Chalet – Vive le vin (Adam). Pathé 3½” Concert-Size 0319, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. Most acceptable copy has various mildew spots, most certainly audible. MB 45

0494. DAN BEDDOE & MARGARET KEYES: Il Trovatore – Ai nostri monti (in English). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28203. only form of issue, 1914, New York, Beddoe’s only cylinder made during Beddoe’s American years, 1902-33. This exquisite Welsh tenor was fully the equal of McCormack. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 25

0495. GUSTAVO BERNAL-RESKY: Preghiera (Tosti). Edison 2-minute B 16, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 45

0496. ROMEO BERTI: Il Trovatore – Deserto sulla terra. Edison 2-minute B 34, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. Choice copy has small hole in box top. MB 25

0497. LÉON BEYLE: Cavalleria – Siciliana (in French). Pathé 3½” Concert-Size 3251, in Orig. Box. Acceptable copy has serious mildew, positively audible. MB 15

0498. ROBERT BLASS: Die Zauberflöte – In diesen heil’gen Hallen. Edison 2- minute B 48, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. Exceedingly elusive, one of Blass’ only two cylinders! M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 85

“The sturdy voice of Robert Blass may be dimly heard on several Mapleson cylinders and a few rare Victor and Edison discs made in the 1900s. Born in New York of German parents, Blass originally went to Leipzig in 1887 to study the violin, but after a few voice lessons with the celebrated baritone Julius Stockhausen, one of Garcia’s most distinguished pupils, he soon discovered that he possessed a bass-baritone of unusual strength and substance. After a period on German stages and at Covent Garden, Blass joined the Met in 1900 and remained for ten years as a mainstay of the Wagner wing….He returned to Germany in 1913, but the Met called him back in 1920 – at the age of fifty-three….”


- Peter G. Davis, THE AMERICAN OPERA SINGER, p.201


0499. ALESSANDRO BONCI: Rigoletto – Questa o quella; La Donna è mobile. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 29001. only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 45

0500. MARY BOYER: Carmen – Je dis que rien ne m’épouvante. Edison 2-minute 17225. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 45

0501. LUCREZIA BORI: La Boheme – Mi chiamano Mimi. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28122, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0502. LUCREZIA BORI: Manon Lescaut – In quelle trine morbide. Edison 4-minute 40032, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

“Bori began her formal studies at the age of 21 in Milan with Vidal; the slightly younger Spanish singer Graziella Pareto was a fellow student. Bori made her debut as Micaëla in 1908 at the Teatro Adriano in Rome, substituted for Maria Farneti in MADAMA BUTTERFLY at San Carlo, and was engaged at La Scala the following season (1910–1911). At the urging of Toscanini, she débuted in Puccini’s MANON LESCAUT on 9 June 1910 with the Metropolitan during its season at the Châtelet in Paris. Lina Cavalieri was to sing the title rôle but cancelled, and the relatively unknown Lucrezia Bori sang the rôle opposite none other than Enrico Caruso. Despite being offered a Met contract after this performance, Bori fulfilled her La Scala obligation. Her début rôle at La Scala (10 January 1911) was Carolina in Cimarosa’s IL MATRIMONIO SEGRETO, a revival so successful that it ran for 15 performances that season. Bori joined the Metropolitan in 1912 and débuted on the opening night of the 1912–1913 season as Manon Lescaut. Thus began a nearly 25-year career with the Met. Bori’s lyric-soprano voice was expressive and her manner patrician. She made two Edison cylinders soon after her five MANON LESCAUT performances with the Met in Paris.”


- Ward Marston, Program Notes to THE EDISON LEGACY


0503. ALOIS BURGSTALLER: Don Giovanni – Dalla sua pace (in German). Edison 2-minute B 25, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 95

“Alois Burgstaller was encouraged to sing professionally by Cosima Wagner, the widow of Richard Wagner, and he made a serious study of opera. He took lessons in Frankfurt and at the Bayreuth School under Julius Kniese, making his stage début in 1894 at the Bayreuth Festival in a small part. He would go on to sing the major Wagnerian rôles of Siegfried, Siegmund, Erik and Parsifal at Bayreuth from 1896 to 1903. He also performed these rôles at other leading European opera houses, including those in such important cities as Paris, Zürich, Budapest, London, Amsterdam and Moscow. Burgstaller made his American début at the Metropolitan Opera, as Siegmund in DIE WALKÜRE on 12 February, 1903. His final performance, as Siegmund, occurred on 14 January, 1909.

On Christmas Eve, 1903, he had sung the title rôle in the first staged American performance of Richard Wagner’s PARSIFAL at the Met. This performance was in violation of German copyright law and angered Cosima Wagner, who was trying to keep productions of the work exclusive to Bayreuth. As a result, Burgstaller, as well as the baritone Anton van Rooy and conductor Alfred Hertz, were banned from any further performances at Bayreuth.”


0504. ERNESTO CARONNA: La Traviata – Di Provenza il mar. Edison 4-minute 30034. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 25

0505. ERNESTO CARONNA: Hamlet – O vin dissipe la tristesse (in Italian). Edison 4-minute B 186. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 25

0506. ERNESTO CARONNA: Ballo – Eri tu. Edison 4-minute B 196. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 25

0507. ANNA CASE: Old folks at home (Foster). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28260. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0508. ANNA CASE: Believe me if all those endearing young charms (Moore). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28108, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0509. ANNA CASE: Annie Laurie (Foster). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28261. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0510. ANNA CASE & PAUL ALTHOUSE: Il Trovatore – Miserere. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28197, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

“Thomas Edison was particularly fond of [Case’s] voice and often used it in his famous ‘Tone Test’ demonstrations. Setting up his playback apparatus on one side of the stage and a singer on the other, Edison invited the audience to guess when the machine left off and the real thing took over. It may strike us as incredible, but many listeners were actually unable to tell….In 1929 she had married Clarence H. Mackay, the millionaire telegraph king, and soon she retired for good. She never forgot the first big break she got at the Metropolitan [as Sophie in the Met première of DER ROSENKAVALIER], however, [when] at her death in 1984 at the age of ninety-four, Case…left the company $1.2 million to be used for new productions.”


- Peter G. Davis, THE AMERICAN OPERA SINGER, pp.291-92


0511. THOMAS CHALMERS: One sweetly solumn thought (Ambrose); Metropolitan Quartet: Lead, kindly light (Dykes). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28104. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

“Before he became a busy actor on stage and screen, Thomas Chalmers sang with the Metropolitan Opera. A star baritone, with the company 1913-21, he specialized in French and Italian lyric rôles, most notably Alfio in CAVALLARIA RUSTICANA and Valentin in FAUST."


0512. MARIUS CHAMBON: Die Zauberflöte – O Isis und Osiris (in French). Pathé 2-minute 3150, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. This famous bass married the celebrated Belgian soprano Léonie Tanésy in 1900, although they had been singing together in Marseilles for more than ten years. MB 45

0513. FLORENCIO CONSTANTINO: Barbiere – Ecco ridente. Edison 2-minute B 11, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0514. FLORENCIO CONSTANTINO: La Traviata - De’ miei bollenti spiriti. Edison 2-minute B 40. Most acceptable copy has minor mildew spots. Only form of issue. MB 25

0515. FLORENCIO CONSTANTINO: Manon Lescaut – Guardate, pazzo son! Edison 2-minute B 42, in Orig. Box. Most acceptable copy has minor mildew spots. Only form of issue. MB 25

0516. FLORENCIO CONSTANTINO: Rigoletto – La Donna è mobile. Edison 2-minute B 4. Most acceptable copy has very lt. grey. Only form of issue. MB 25

“Constantino’s records merit special attention. His is a voice of much grace, with a sweet mezza voce and a legato of impeccable quality. His style takes us back to pre-Caruso days”


- Andrea Shum-Binder, subito-cantabile


0517. PAUL DANGELY: La Juive – Rachel, quand du Seigneur. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 27078, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0518. R. FESTYN DAVIES: Non è ver (Mattei). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1628, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 15

0519. ELEONORA de CISNEROS: Ben Bolt (Kneiss). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28103, not in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

“Born in New York City née Eleanora Broadfoot, de Cisneros studied singing under Mme. Murio Celli in New York, and made her début at the Metropolitan Opera House in 1899. In the following year she was married to Count François G. de Cisneros. Between 1900 and 1906 she sang more than 40 operatic rôles in Rome, Milan, Madrid, Lisbon, Vienna, St. Petersburg, London, Rio de Janeiro, Sydney and Melbourne. In 1907 she was Oscar Hammerstein's leading mezzo-soprano at the Manhattan Opera House, New York.”


0520. MAURICE DECLÉRY: Menuet d’Exaudet (Weckerlin). Edison 2-minute 17032. Most acceptable copy has minor mildew spots. Only form of issue. MB 15

0521. MARIE DELNA: Le Prophète – Ah, mon fils. Edison 4-minute 40022, in Orig. Box. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor grey on peaks. MB 35

0522. MARIE DELNA: Le Prophète – Ah, mon fils. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28126, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 45

0523. MARIE DELNA: Orfeo ed Euridice – Che farò senza Euridice. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28135, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 45

“Vocally, Delna was captured at her peak by Edison in March 1910, perhaps thanks to under-employment at the Met that winter, with only nine appearances in more than two months. Generally described as a contralto, Delna was rather, as Louis Schneider has perceptively argued, a mezzo-soprano in the 19th century sense, in the tradition of Maria Malibran and Pauline Viardot. Delna had a large voice, the size of which is apparent in these recordings, and a range of three octaves, for which we only have her testimony and that of her contemporaries. Trained by her teacher to become a soprano, she could hit a top D and did sing a low D in public. The color, warmth, evenness of her timbre, and the eloquence of her delivery are also much in evidence in her recorded legacy. Fidès, one of the most taxing parts of the mezzo repertory, was ideally suited to her voice and reportedly impulsive stage temperament. Of her three recordings of ‘Ah, mon fils’, both the Edison cylinder and 1913 Diamond disc must rank among the most impressive ever made of the aria, the voice gleaming seamlessly throughout its range with ringing, organ-like tones. Next to Emma Calvé, Delna was the most celebrated Carmen of her generation”


- Vincent Giroud, Marston Program Notes


0524. ANDREAS DIPPEL: Marta – M’appari (in German). Edison 2-minute B 2. Most acceptable copy has minor mildew spots. Only form of issue. MB 45

0525. ANDREAS DIPPEL: Les Huguenots – Romance (in German). Edison 2-minute B 15. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor grey on peaks. In Orig. Box, w.torn top. Only form of issue. MB 45

“Dippel made his début at the Metropolitan Opera on 26 November 1890 in the title rôle of Franchetti’s ASRAEL for its United States première. He appeared with the company 392 times including three other US premières. Over his entire career as a tenor, he sang 150 rôles, ranging from Don Ottavio in Mozart’s DON GIOVANNI to a wide variety of Wagnerian parts, including the leading tenor rôles in LOHENGRIN and DIE MEISTERSINGER VON NÜRNBERG. He was known for his willingness to step into rôles when his colleagues were ill and substituted for Jean de Reszké on several occasions. In 1908 and from 1910 to 1913, Dippel managed the Philadelphia-Chicago Grand Opera Company, after which he formed the Dippel Opera Comique Company.”


0526. ANDREAS DIPPEL: Marta – M’appari (in German). Edison 2-minute B 2. Most acceptable copy has minor mildew spots. Only form of issue. MB 45

0527. ANDREAS DIPPEL: Les Huguenots – Romance (in German). Edison 2-minute B 15. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor grey on peaks. In Orig. Box, w.torn top. Only form of issue. MB 45

0528. MARCELIN DUCLOS: Benvenuto Cellini – Pitié pour moi (Diaz). Edison 4-minute B 175. Exceptional copy. MB 35

0529. RALPH ERROLE: Alice, where art thou? (Ascher) Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 3520, in Orig. Box. MB 12

0530. RALPH ERROLE & ARTHUR MIDDLETON: Mother, my dear (Treherne) Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 3625. In his later years, Errole was a prominent teacher of Arleen Augér. MB 12

0531. ESTER FERRABINI: Cavalleria – Voi lo sapete. Edison 4-minute B 180. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 25

“Madame Ester Ferrabini, at Boston Conservatory in the years 1918-1924, was a native Italian whose technical legacy harkened back to the mid-19th century and its performance practices”


0532. RENÉ FOURNETS: Le Chalet – Vallons de l’Helvétie (Adam). Pathé 2-minute 3566. Only form of issue. MB 35

0533. RENÉ FOURNETS: Sigurd – Et toi, Fréïa (Reyer). Edison 2-minute 17204, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor rubs. MB 35

0534. RENÉ FOURNETS: Faust – Vous qui faites l’endormie. Pathé 2-minute 3541. Only form of issue. M-A, gleaming copy has two wee chips at very beginning. MB 25

0535. CARLO GALEFFI: Il Trovatore – Il balen. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28148. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0536. CARLO GALEFFI: Pagliacci – Prologo. Edison 4-minute 30041, in Orig. Box. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor rubs. MB 25

“Galeffi sang throughout Italy before reaching La Scala, in 1912. He would remain at La Scala until 1938, becoming a favorite of the conductor Arturo Toscanini. Galeffi made his American début in Boston in 1910. He sang at the Metropolitan Opera only once, on 29 November of that same year, as Verdi's Rigoletto (which was often considered to be his greatest rôle). Galeffi sang, too, at the Lyric Opera of Chicago from 1919 to 1921, and also appeared in South America on a number of occasions. The bulk of Galeffi's career, however, took place in Italy, especially at La Scala. Galeffi possessed a beautiful voice supported by an excellent technique. He is considered to have been one of the finest operatic baritones active during the period between the outbreak of World War I and the onset of World War II.”


0537. LINA GARAVAGLIA: Don Pasquale – So anch’io la virtu magica. Edison 2-minute B 58, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, gleaming copy has damaged box top. MB 25

0538. GAUTIER: La Favorite – Un ange, une femme inconnue. Pathé 3½” Concert-Size 0077, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. Gautier débuted at L’Opéra-Comique in GÉRALD, 10 Jan., 1901. Acceptable copy has serious mildew, positively audible. MB 15

0539. GAUTIER: La Juive – Rachel, quand du Seigneur. Pathé 3½” Concert-Size 0144, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. Gautier débuted at L’Opéra-Comique in GÉRALD, 10 Jan., 1901. Acceptable copy has serious mildew, positively audible. MB 15

0540. CHARLES GILIBERT: Véronique – Strophes de la lettre (Messager). Edison 2-minute 17736, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. This issue number is missing in G & B. MB 45

0541. DINH GILLY: Carmen – Chanson du Toréador. Edison 2-minute 17286, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 45

“One source places [Gilly’s] début as early as 1899 (Paris Opéra, a priest in SIGURD) while others cite 1902 (Paris Opéra, Silvio in PAGLIACCI). We do know that he sang at the Teatro Colón, as well as in Spain, Germany, and Monaco prior to his Metropolitan Opera début in the 1909–1910 season. There he sang Sonora in the world première of LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST (10 December, 1910). Between 1908 and 1928 he made approximately 40 disc recordings for Beka, Odeon, HMV, and Victor. He recorded three Edison cylinders, which were published.”


- Ward Marston, Program Notes to THE EDISON LEGACY


0542. GLUCK: La Favorite - Ange du Paradis. Edison 2-minute 17339, in Orig. Box. Most acceptable copy has minor mildew spots. Only form of issue. Exceedingly elusive example of this tenor who débuted at l’Opéra-Comique, 22 May, 1891. MB 20

0543. OTTO GORITZ: Ich grolle nicht (Schumann). Edison 2-minute B 51, in Orig. Box. Most acceptable copy has minor mildew spots. Only form of issue. Exceedingly elusive, 1 of Goritz’s 5 cylinders! MB 25

0544. OTTO GORITZ: Die Nachtlager in Grenada - Ein Schütz bin ich (Kreutzer). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28262. Only form of issue. Exceedingly elusive, 1 of Goritz’s 5 cylinders! M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

“Goritz began his career as an actor and made his début as an opera singer in 1895. His first houses were Bremen and Hamburg where he stayed until 1903. He guested at the Vienna Hofoper in 1903 which led to a contract with the Metropolitan Opera. Goritz was hired to sing the more lyrical heldenbaritone roles at the MET where his roles included that of the creation of the Spielmann in Englebert Humperdinck’s KÖNIGSKINDER and Baron Ochs in the American Premiere of DER ROSENKAVALIER. Goritz sang at the MET until 1917, when he was deported from the Country as an enemy alien. He resumed singing in Hamburg after the War through 1921 and then the Berlin Volksoper from 1922-1925.”


0545. CHARLES HACKETT: Matinata (Leoncavallo). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1636. Only form of issue, altogether missing in G & B. 1 of Hackett’s 4 cylinders. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor rubs. MB 15

0546. CHARLES HACKETT: Maritana – Let me like a soldier fall (Wallace). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1724. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. MB 15

0547. CHARLES HACKETT & THOMAS CHALMERS: Marta – Solo profugo. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28155. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 15

0548. ORVILLE HARROLD: Mary (Richardson). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28129. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. MB 25

0549. ORVILLE HARROLD: The sweetest story ever told (Stults). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28169. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. MB 25

0550. ORVILLE HARROLD: I hear you calling me (Marshall). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28110. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. MB 25

“Harrold was one of the leading tenors at the Metropolitan Opera from 1919 to 1924. He made his début at the Met as Prince Leopold in Halévy's LA JUIVE with Enrico Caruso as Eléazar and Rosa Ponselle as Rachel. The following year he created the rôle of Meïamoun in the world première of Henry Kimball Hadley's CLEOPATRA'S NIGHT. He sang in several United States premières at the Met, including starring turns in Korngold's DIE TOTE STADT (1921, opposite Maria Jeritza) and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's THE SNOW MAIDEN (1922, as the Tsar). He also performed the rôle of Julien in the Met's first staging of Charpentier's LOUISE in 1921 with Geraldine Farrar in the title rôle. In 1922 he sang opposite Madame Charles Cahier in the New York première of Mahler's DAS LIED VON DER ERDE under conductor Artur Bodanzky. After leaving the Met in 1924, he never performed in opera again. He made one last appearance on Broadway in 1925, starring as Peter Novak in the musical HOLKA POLKA at the Lyric Theatre. He continued to perform in vaudeville up into the late 1920s.”


0551. MELITTA HEIM: Ballo – Saper vorreste (in German). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28121, in Orig. Box, accompanied by Edison brochure. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue, as listed in G & B. MB 45

“Heim was a student of Frau Schlemmer and Johannes Ressin in Vienna. She made her début as Gilda in Graz, 1909. From 1911–1916 she was the leading coloratura at Frankfurt, and from 1917–1922 she appeared successfully with the Vienna Staatsoper. She sang as a guest at the Drury Lane Theatre in London in 1912 and returned as the Queen of the Night in 1914. Her repertoire included coloratura and lyric rôles such as Lakmé, Lucia, Violetta, Mimi, and Leonora in IL TROVATORE, this last occasionally sung in that era by coloraturas. Some sort of nervous disability necessitated her retirement from the operatic stage in 1922. Being Jewish, she and her mother fled from Germany to England in 1938. Having no financial resources, Heim had to work for a period as a scrubwoman, but later became established as a voice teacher. Her commercial recordings were made in the later ’teens for Odeon. Two cylinders appeared on Edison, but her Edison Discs were not published.”


- Ward Marston, Program Notes to THE EDISON LEGACY


0552. FRIEDA HEMPEL, w.Mary Zentay (Violin): Cavalleria – Ave Maria. Edison 4-minute Purple Amberol 29027. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 25

“Hempel made her professional début in Breslau, and her Berlin début in 1905 at the Royal Opera in Nicolai’s DIE LUSTIGEN WEIBER VON WINDSOR. From 1905–1907 she was at the Court Opera in Schwerin, and from 1907–1912 she was a member of the Royal Opera in Berlin. Hempel was first heard at Covent Garden in 1907 in a double bill as Mozart’s Bastienne and Humperdinck’s Gretel, then as Eva and Mistress Ford (Nicolai’s DIE LUSTIGEN WEIBER VON WINDSOR). From 1912–1919 she was on the roster of the Metropolitan Opera, where she made her début as Marguerite de Valois in on 27 December 1912. On 9 December 1913 she sang the Marschallin in the American première of DER ROSENKAVALIER, a rôle Richard Strauss had given her for the Berlin première almost two years previously. Her important London success came during Thomas Beecham’s Drury Lane season of 1914, when she sang the Queen of the Night, perhaps her most famous rôle. In 1919 she left the Metropolitan Opera, and on 6 October 1920, on the centenary of Jenny Lind’s birth, Hempel began giving a series of recitals in which she impersonated Jenny Lind. These concerts, in which she wore clothing from Lind’s time, were so successful that she continued to give them as well as other recitals until her retirement in 1951. Hempel made records for Odeon, HMV, Victor, Polydor, and Edison (both discs and cylinders).”


- Ward Marston, Program Notes to THE EDISON LEGACY


0553. AGNES HERMANN: Die Lorelei (Silcher). Edison 2-minute 15645. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. Exceedingly elusive, 1 of Hermann’s 2 cylinders! MB 25

0554. JOSEPHINE JACOBY: Roméo – Que fais-tu, blanche tourterelle? Edison 2-minute B 39, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. Exceedingly elusive, 1 of Jacoby’s 4 cylinders! MB 75

0555. JOSEPHINE JACOBY: Faust – Faites-lui mes aveux. Edison 2-minute B 47, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. Exceedingly elusive, 1 of Jacoby’s 4 cylinders! MB 75

0556. JOSEPHINE JACOBY: Les Huguenots – Une dame noble et sage. Edison 2-minute B 28. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. Exceedingly elusive, 1 of Jacoby’s 4 cylinders! MB 75

”Josephine Jacoby has been singing at the Metropolitan for five years, and has held the record for appearances there every year. 'However, Miss Jacoby will not sing at the Metropolitan next year. She has decided either to return to concert work, in which she was well known before she went on the lyric stage, or to sing in operetta, following the example of Mme. Schumann-Heink and Fritzi Scheff. Two composers at present are figuratively on their knees before her, ready to dash off an operetta for her light opera début.”


THE NEW YORK TIMES, 6 April 1908,


0557. KARL JÖRN: Mäd’le, rück, rück, rück. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28228. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0558. KARL JÖRN: Manon – Le rêve (w.Recit., in French). Edison 4-minute 40042. Most acceptable copy has one minor scrape, audible a few turns. Only form of issue. MB 15

0559. KARL JÖRN: Lohengrin – In fernem Land. Edison 4-minute 40037. Most acceptable copy has very lt. grey. Only form of issue. MB 20

0560. KARL JÖRN: Lohengrin – Mein lieber Schwann. Edison 4-minute 40025. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. MB 25

0561. KARL JÖRN: Tannhäuser – Imbrunst im Herzen. Edison 4-minute 40018, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. MB 25

“In 1896 Karl Jörn made his début as Lyonel (MARTA) in Freiburg. After public appearances in Zürich and Hamburg, he was engaged at the Berlin Hofoper in 1902. From 1906 to 1908 Jörn appeared very successfully in London; on 22January, 1909 he finally made his New York début at the Metropolitan Opera as Stolzing. For the following years he commuted between New York and Berlin, but finished his contract with the Berlin Hofoper in 1911. From 1912 to 1914 he lived in New York and had a contract with the Metropolitan Opera. From 1914 on. He received an invitation from Johanna Gadski in 1929 to appear on stage again with her touring ‘German Opera Company’. Once more Karl Jörn was highly celebrated, especially for his début in the rôle of Tristan (at age 56!). Jörn’s numerous records show the exceptional versatility of his voice, his repertoire ranging from Mozart and the lighter German and French parts to the great Wagner rôles. Even with German Lieder he was very successful.”


0562. MARGARET KEYES: Angel’s serenade (Braga). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28109, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. MB 10

0563. MARGARET KEYES: Old folks at home (Foster). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28143. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 10

0564. AGNES KIMBALL, REED MILLER & FRANK CROXTON: Faust – Final Trio. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1502. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 15

0565. HEINRICH KNOTE: Die Meistersinger – Morgenlich leuchtend (1906 Version). Edison 2-minute B 13, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 75

0566. HEINRICH KNOTE: Die Meistersinger – Morgenlich leuchtend (1912 Version). Edison 2-minute 28124. Only form of issue. Most acceptable copy has very lt. grey. MB 50

0567. HEINRICH KNOTE: Lohengrin – Höchstes vertrauen. Edison 2-minute B 1, in Orig. Box. M-A, gleaming copy has damaged box top. Only form of issue. MB 75

“Knote’s long German career was centered almost entirely in Munich where he remained for nearly 40 years. He was a superior Wagnerian Heldentenor, his striking physique well matched by a clear, resonant, sympathetic voice and impressive declamation. Between 1900 and 1913 he made many successful appearances at Covent Garden, and was, if anything, even more appreciated at the Metropolitan, where he sang from1904 to 1908, and where his performance fees were, at one time, twice those earned by van Rooy. In addition to numerous pre-1914 recordings, mainly of Wagner, Knote made a further Wagner series as late as 1930, demonstrating an amazing endurance, even in some respects a positive improvement, of his vocal powers.”


0568. JOSEPHINE KRAUS: Boccaccio – Hab’ ich nur deine Liebe (Suppé). Edison 2-minute 12275, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. Only form of issue. MB 45

0569. SELMA KURZ: Rigoletto – Caro nome. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28133, in Orig. Box, accompanied by Edison brochure. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 60

0570. SELMA KURZ: Lucia – Aria della follia. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28162. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 60

0571. SELMA KURZ: Barbiere – Una voce poco fà. Edison 4-minute 35014, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 60

“Selma Kurz ranks amongst the leading coloratura-voices of this century. The stupendous brilliance and the incredible ease with which she mastered the most difficult and breakneck coloratura-passages were and are truly impressive. Selma Kurz left over 150 78-rpm recordings. The first were made for Emile Berliner in 1900 These were followed by Zonophone and Gramophone & Typewriter Company discs, dating from 1901-1906. She then made a long series for HMV (now EMI) in 1907-1914. These are by far the best of her recordings, capturing the attractiveness of her tone and the exceptional agility of her vocal technique. Around 1910, she recorded three cylinders [above] for the Edison company.”


0572. MARIA LABIA: Otello – Ave Maria. Edison 4-minute 35021. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor rubs. MB 35

0573. MARIA LABIA: Cavalleria – Voi lo sapete. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28114. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

“Labia was born into Venetian nobility. Her grandmother had been an operatic singer and her mother a trained singer, with whom she studied. Her sister, Fausta, was also a noted soprano. Maria made her operatic début in Stockholm, 1905, as Mimi in LA BOHÈME. In 1907 she had great success at the Berlin Komische Opera. She was similarly received at Hammerstein’s Manhattan Opera, 1908–1910, the Vienna Opera, and many other important houses. She was La Scala’s first Salome (1913) and at Rome’s Costanzi she created Giorgetta in the 1919 Italian premiere of Puccini’s IL TABARRO. While she recorded for Odeon in Germany, it was her Edison discs and cylinders that most effectively represented her voice."


- Ward Marston, Program Notes to THE EDISON LEGACY


0574. MARIO LAURENTI: Forza – Urna fatale. Edison Purple Amberol 25059. Exceptional copy has occasional infinitesimal edge patina at very beginning. MB 55

0575. ANTOINETTE LAUTE-BRUN: Le Pré aux Clercs – Jours de mon enfance (Hérold). Edison black wax 17163, in Orig. Box. This issue number is missing in G & B. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 85

0576. ANTOINETTE LAUTE-BRUN: Faust – Le Roi de Thulé. Edison black wax 17156, in Orig. Box. This issue number is missing in G & B. Most acceptable copy has very lt. grey. MB 65

“Laute-Brun’s début was at the Paris Opéra, 1903, as the Page in TANNHÄUSER. The Paris Opéra remained her artistic home for over two decades. Laute-Brun (after her marriage to composer Georges Brun in 1907) had a huge repertoire, including a number of creations, primarily of smaller rôles, although she occasionally sang principal parts as well in both the soprano and mezzo ranges. As an example, she was heard at the Opéra as both Marguerite and Siebel in FAUST and in the rôles of Helmwige and Frika in DIE WALKÜRE.”


- Lawrence F. Holdridge, Program Notes to Marston’s EDISON TRIALS


0577. EDUARD LICHTENSTEIN: Am Meer (Schubert). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28087, in Orig. Box. Altogether missing in G & B. M-A, gleaming copy has mended box top. MB 20

0578. RICCARDO MARTIN: Good bye (Tosti). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28167. Martin’s sole recording in English. Exceptional copy has infinitesimal edge patina at very beginning. MB 35

0579. RICCARDO MARTIN: Pagliacci – Vesti la giubba. Edison 4-minute B 160, in Orig. Box. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor grey on peaks. MB 20

0580. RICCARDO MARTIN: Il Trovatore – A sì, ben mio. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28113. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor grey on peaks. MB 20

0581. RICCARDO MARTIN: Cavalleria – Siciliana. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28158. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0582. RICCARDO MARTIN: Tosca – E lucevan le stelle. Edison 4-minute B 181, in Orig. Box. Exceptional copy has few faint rubs. MB 35

“Riccardo Martin in 1901, went to Paris to study with Giovanni Sbriglia and Jean de Reszké; he later completed his studies with Vincenzo Lombardi in Florence and Beniamino Carelli in Naples. He débuted as Faust in Nantes in 1904. Two years later he made his American début in New Orleans, singing with the visiting San Carlo Opera. Martin bowed at the Metropolitan Opera on 20 November, 1907 in MEFISTOFELE; the performance also marked the American début of Fyodor Chaliapin. Martin remained with the Metropolitan through the 1914-15 season, appearing in numerous leading tenor rôles; he was among the first American-born leading men the company employed. He returned for the 1917-18 season. During his tenure at the Met, he created the lead tenor rôles in three American operas: Walter Damrosch’s CYRANO, Horatio Parker’s MONA, and Frederick Shepherd Converse’s THE PIPE OF DESIRE. After leaving the company he appeared with numerous companies throughout America and Europe, and spent three seasons with the Chicago Civic Opera”


0583. Sig. MIELINO: Aïda – Celeste Aïda. Edison 2-minute 12448. Altogether missing in G & B. Exceptional copy has small piece missing at beginning, just before start of the aria. MB 12

0584. MARIE MORRISEY: Loch Lomond. Edison 4-minute 3311. Exceptional copy has few faint rubs. MB 12

0585. CÉCILE MERGUILLIER: Le Pré aux Clercs – Jours de mon enfance (Hérold). Edison 2-minute 17358, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. Exceptional copy has few faint rubs. MB 35

0586. CÉCILE MERGUILLIER: Barbiere – Una voce poco fà (in French). Edison 2-minute 17285. Only form of issue. Exceptional copy has few faint rubs. MB 35

0587. CÉCILE MERGUILLIER: Manon – La séduction (Saint Sulpice Scene - ‘N’est-ce plus ma main’). Edison 2-minute 17245, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. Exceptional copy has few faint rubs. MB 35

0588. CÉCILE MERGUILLIER: Mireille – O légère hirondelle. Edison 2-minute 17250, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. Exceptional copy has few faint rubs. MB 35

“Merguillier made her début at the Opéra-Comique on 28 December 1881 in Adam’s LE TORÉADOR. Merguillier was a lead soprano léger at the Opéra-Comique from her début in 1881 until 1888. She returned for the 1891 and 1892 as well as the 1897 and 1898 seasons. She also performed for the season 1888-89 at La Monnaie, in 1895 in Moscow. She was the Philine in that tragic performance of MIGNON on 25 May 1887 when the old Opéra-Comique burned to the ground. The troupe was homeless until October 1887 when the old Théâtre Lyrique (later named the Théâtre du Châtelet) became their new home, and Merguillier left. She appeared in a benefit concert at the Opéra in 1892. In 1902 she appeared again in a benefit concert, dubbed by Stoullig ‘un festival monstre’, held for the musicians’ retirement fund of the Opéra-Comique. 127 former and current soloists appeared (from Capoul to Sibyl Sanderson to Mary Garden) accompanied by seven different conductors: Bruneau, Charpentier, Luigini, Marty, Messager, Massenet and Saint-Saëns. While Merguillier’s voice was fuller (one might almost say brasher) than Calvé’s, they shared many vocal traits in common: a fully developed chest ‘register’, a perfectly integrated scale to above the staff and a slightly pinched ‘heady’ top. They were both part of the ‘old school’ of French singing which, ten years later, was considered old-fashioned and no longer taught.”


- Victor Girard, Marston Program Notes


0589. LUCIEN MURATORE: La Traviata – Brindisi. Edison 2-minute17512. Only form of issue. Exceptional copy has few faint rubs. MB 35

0590. LUCIEN MURATORE & MARGUERITE BÉRIZA (Mr & Mrs Muratore): Mignon – Je suis heureuse. Edison 2-minute 17142, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 45

0591. LUCIEN MURATORE & MARGUERITE BÉRIZA (Mr & Mrs Muratore): Faust – O nuit d’amour. Edison 2-minute 17395, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 45

“In virtually every recording [Muratore] demonstrates a very well-schooled technique. The voice, although of considerable weight, is bright and beautifully controlled. His singing through the passaggio allows a smooth transition into his extension (upper register), which contains some very impressive ringing top A naturals and B flats. He had mastery over his mezza voce, understood chiaroscuro by colouring his tone and was able to produce floated piano head tones, using these vocal effects with good taste. This is coupled with informed phrasing, a good legato and, where required, a true sense of drama….In his singing, Muratore’s use of dynamics and tonal colour can convey an effect, at times, of a lovely voice, something not given all singers.”


- Alan Bilgora, THE RECORD COLLECTOR, 2009


0592. OTTILIE METZGER: Le Prophète – Ah, mon fils (in German). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 26114, in Orig. Box. Exceptional copy has infinitesimal edge patina at very end. MB 45

“It becomes clear almost instantly that Metzger took her records quite seriously, and it is probably fair to assume we are left with a relatively accurate account of what was heard by her audiences. On records, Metzger displays the sort of otherworldly, deep and compelling voice needed for Wagner’s earth mothers and all-knowing goddesses. Yet curiously, her most recently re-issued recordings appear on Ward Marston’s ‘complete’ CARMEN from 1908, a CD set featuring Emmy Destinn. When re-takes were necessary for some of the selections, Destinn was indisposed, so Metzger took her place! Her recorded legacy offers her in a variety of music."


- Andrea Shum-Binder, subito-cantabile


0593. CARL NEBE: Die beiden Grenadiere (Schumann). Edison 4-minute 15048. This issue number is missing in G & B. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0594. CARL NEBE: Rigoletto – O veglia o donna (in German). Edison 2-minute 12271. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0595. LOUIS NUCELLY: La Favorite – Viens, Léonore. Edison 4-minute B 176, in Orig. Box. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor grey on peaks. MB 15

0596. AUGUSTIN NUIBO: Werther – Pourquoi me réveiller? Pathé 2-minute 4667, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 45

0597. JOSEPH A. PHILLIPS: The soldiers of the king. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 2461, in Orig. Box. Altogher missing in G & B, Phillips’ very few other recordings are all on Okeh, 1917. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 15

0598. MARIE RAPPOLD: Smiles (Roberts). Edison 4-minute Purple Amberol 92020. M-A, gleaming copy has few superficial mks. MB 15

0599. MARIE RAPPOLD: Chantez, Riez, Dormez (Gounod). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28175. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0600. MARIE RAPPOLD: Agnus Dei (Bizet). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28171, in Orig. Box. This issue number is missing in G & B. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0601. MARIE RAPPOLD: Tannhäuser – Allmächt’ge Jungfrau. Edison 2-minute B 43, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0602. MARIE RAPPOLD: Der Freischütz – Wie nacte mir der Schlummer. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28117. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0603. MARIE RAPPOLD & CAROLINA LAZZARI: Life’s dream is o’er (Ascher). Edison 4-minute 29051. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 15

0604. MARIE RAPPOLD, KARL JÖRN & ARTHUR MIDDLETON: Attila – Te sol quest’anima (in English). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28238. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0605. MARIE RAPPOLD, w.Albert Spalding (Violin): Ave Maria (Gounod) (1906 Version). Edison 2-minute B 21. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0606. MARIE RAPPOLD, w.Albert Spalding (Violin): Ave Maria (Gounod) (1910 Version). Edison 4-minute 28005, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0607. MARIE RAPPOLD, w.Albert Spalding (Violin): Ave Maria (Gounod) (1910 Version). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28106. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 15

“Rappold’s début was at the Metropolitan Opera as Sulamith in Goldmark’s DIE KÖNIGIN VON SABA in 1905, and she performed an additional 23 rôles, including Elsa, Euridice, Desdemona, Leonora in IL TROVATORE, and the Woodbird in SIEGFRIED. She left the Metropolitan Opera in 1920. During the 1920s she appeared in Havana with the Chicago Opera. Rappold was an exclusive Edison artist, having begun with cylinders in 1906 and was one of Edison’s most popular sopranos. Her recorded repertoire ran the gamut from popular songs of the day and concert literature, through arias and duets from Verdi, Wagner, and Puccini operas.”


- Ward Marston, Program Notes to THE EDISON LEGACY


0608. ALAN TURNER: Venetian song (Tosti). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1640. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 12

0609. ALAN TURNER: Bohemian Girl – The heart bow’d down (Balfe). Edison 2-minute 999. This issue number is missing in G & B. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 12

0610. EMILIA VERGERI & PEDRO VINART: Die Lustige Witwe – Couplets (in Spanish) (Lehár). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 22144. Only form of issue, missing entirely from G & B. Exceptional copy has sev. mildew spots, but plays beautifully. MB 25

0611. ANTON van ROOY: Carmen – Chanson du Toréador. Edison 2-minute B 10, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor grey on peaks. MB 75

“Anton van Rooy was a Dutch bass-baritone who had a voice of enormous proportions and is most remembered for his association with the music dramas of Richard Wagner, especially the RING Cycle, DIE MEISTERSINGER and PARSIFAL. Born in Rotterdam, van Rooy studied with the famous voice teacher Julius Stockhausen in Frankfurt . He made his operatic début at the Bayreuth Festival in 1897, singing Wotan in DER RING DES NIBELUNGEN. The year 1898 saw his débuts in Berlin and at the Royal Opera House in London, and on 14 December that same year he sang for the first time at the Metropolitan Opera as Wotan in DIE WALKÜRE. He remained with the Met until 1908, during which time he was heard in all the leading baritone Wagnerian rôles. Most notably, he created Amfortas in the American première of PARSIFAL in 1903. Four years later, he created the part of John the Baptist in the initial New York production of Richard Strauss’ then controversial opera, SALOME. van Rooy also continued to sing regularly at Bayreuth until 1903, when he was banned by Cosima Wagner from any further performances at the festival, because the Met performances of PARSIFAL in which he had participated in breaching German copyright law. His appearances in London spanned the years 1898-1913. He made gramophone recordings, too, and was a noted song recitalist and soloist in oratorio.”


0612. ANTONIO SCOTTI: Pagliacci – Prologo. Edison 2–minute B 20, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 95

0613. ANTONIO SCOTTI: Aïda – Sortita d’Amonasro. Edison 2–minute B 32, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 95

0614. ANTONIO SCOTTI: Don Pasquale – Bella siccome un angelo. Edison 2–minute B 44, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, gleaming copy has sl. damaged box top. MB 85

“I have come to look on Antonio Scotti as one of the most satisfying of singers. His is not a voice to dazzle the hearer, nor is there a great range of colour. There is an austerity about his singing and an amazing rightness in almost everything he sings. His suavity, sonority, and clean-cut technique all go to place him apart from other baritones….”


- Laurie Hevingham-Root, THE RECORD COLLECTOR, 1984


0615. LEO SLEZAK: Tosca – E lucevan le stelle. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28146. This issue number is missing in G & B. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 55

“For the 30 years that opened the twentieth century, Leo Slezak was one of the outstanding dramatic tenors, and is best known today for his Wagnerian rôles, but he was also capable of the shading and subtleties required for French opera, and was greatly admired in such roles as Gérald in Delibes' LAKMÉ and des Grieux in Massenet's MANON. In 1901, his rise to fame began when he came to the attention of Gustav Mahler, who invited him to join the Vienna State Opera. He made his début as Arnold in GUILLAME TELL, beginning a 32-year association with that house. In 1907, however, when Mahler left, Slezak also left to pursue an international career. In Paris, he studied the French operatic repertoire with Jean de Reszke and song with Reynaldo Hahn. Moving on to the United States, his Met débutwas as Otello in 1909. Though he returned to the Vienna State Opera in 1913, he continued to make international appearances until his farewell performance as Canio in 1933.”


- Ann Feeney, All Music Guide


0616. VICTOR SORLIN (Cello): Madama Butterfly - Fantaisie. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 2008. This issue number is missing in G & B. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 12

0617. ELIZABETH SPENCER: Ciribiribin (in English) (Pestalozza). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1825. This issue number is missing in G & B. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 15

0618. ELIZABETH SPENCER: Jocelyn – Berceuse (in English) (Godard). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 2466. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 12

0619. ELIZABETH SPENCER & IRVING GILLETTE: Are you going to dance? Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1552, in Orig. Box. Altogher missing in G & B. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 12

0620. ELIZABETH SPENCER, w.Harry Anthony (as John Young) & James F.Harrison (as Frederick J. Wheeler): Stille Nacht (in English) (Gruber). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1606. This issue number is missing in G & B. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 12

"Elizabeth Spencer was an American singer during the latter 19th century and early 20th century. She is primarily remembered as a recording artist for Thomas Alva Edison. She made numerous recordings for Edison from 1888 until 1912. Her voice is noted for its sterling operatic quality combined with ability to sing in the vernacular.”


0621. MAX STEIDL: Fern im Süd’ das schöne Spanien (Reisigger). Edison 4-minute 15925, in Orig. Box. Altogether missing in G & B. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 20

0622. GERTRUDE SYLVA: Manon Lescaut - C’est l’histoire amoureuse (Auber). Edison 2-minute 17756, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue Most acceptable copy has minor mildew spots. MB 25

0623. MARGUERITE SYLVA: Pagliacci – Stridono lassù (in French). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28131. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0624. MARGUERITE SYLVA: Le Cid – Pleurez, mes yeux. Edison 4-minute 40021, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. Exceptional copy has occasional very minor grey on peaks. MB 25

“Marguerite Sylva made her début at l’Opera-Comique on 14 September 1906, in the title rôle of CARMEN to very good reviews. For the next three years Sylva sang with great success throughout France and Germany where she was a particular favourite. In 1909, Oscar Hammerstein invited her to return to America to sing for his opera company. On 1 September 1909, Marguerite Sylva made her American operatic début as Carmen at the Manhattan Opera House. In the ensuing years Sylva sang with Hammerstein's company the Boston Opera Company and with the San Carlo Opera Company in the United States. She also sang in Europe. She continued to appear on Broadway as well, with performances in the premières of GYPSY LOVE and THE SKYLARK.”


0625. LÉONIE TANÉSY: Barbiere – Una voce poco fà. Pathé 2-minute 298, in Orig. Box. Exceptional copy has faint rubs. Missing in G & B. MB 65

“Tanésy was a genuine Meyerbeer singer from a period in which Meyerbeer was still an integral part of the repertoire. We know that she was a member of the Grand-Théâtre de Marseilles during the 1889–1892 and 1895–1897 seasons. There, she was referred to as ‘première forte chanteuse falcon’ and as such was the major soprano for dramatic rôles. In 1889 she sang Valentine in LES HUGUENOTS, a rôle she was closely associated with in subsequent years. In 1890 she appeared as Alice IN ROBERT LE DIABLE, and sang Brunehild in SIGURD, another rôle she was to repeat throughout her career. She also participated in the local première of Paladilhe’s PATRIE. In 1892 and 1895, Tanésy sang Elsa in LOHENGRIN and Elisabeth in TANNHÄUSER. She appeared at the Paris Opéra in 1892, and sang at Bordeaux in 1900. Tanésy must have still been singing professionally in the early years of the twentieth century, as she was actively making recordings at this time. She married the well-known bass, Marius Chambon in 1900, although they had been singing together in Marseilles for more than ten years. Tanésy was a pioneer recorder, making some 60 cylinders for Pathé around the turn of the century, including two duets with her husband. She also recorded a small number of cylinders for Dutreih and discs for the Homophone label.”


- Vincent Giroud, Marston Program Notes


0626. JACQUES URLUS: O schöne Zeit, o sel’ge Zeit (Göetze). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28243. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 65

0627. JACQUES URLUS: Lohengrin – Mein lieber Schwann. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28204. M-A, gleaming copy has 1 minuscule rub. MB 55

0628. JACQUES URLUS & MARIE RAPPOLD: Wenn die Schwalben heimwärts zeih’n (Abt). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28242, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 55

“Lauritz Melchior and Jacques Urlus are considered the greatest ‘Heldentenors’ in history of records. Remarkable is Urlus’ declamation with the right intensity yet without sacrificing a good legato style. In my opinion, he is unique in this respect. His voice was a fully developed dramatic tenor. The dark, almost baritonal quality of the lower range predestined him for Wagner’s heros, but as we know, he suceeded in many other rôles from the German, French and Italian repertoire. Jacques Urlus made about 150 recordings from 1903 - 1924. Jacques Urlus ranks among the greatest singers.”


- Andrea Shum-Binder, subito-cantabile


0629. JEAN VALLIER: La Favorite – Splendon più belle in ciel. Edison 2-minute 17572. Only form of issue. Lovely copy has various lt. mildew spots, but plays beautifully. MB 25

“Bass Jean Vallier made his début at the Paris Opéra in Reyer's SIGURD in 1892. At the Monte Carlo Opéra, where he had his greatest successes, he appeared in SALOME, DAS RHEINGOLD, DIE WALKÜRE, GÖTTERDÄMMERUNG, CRISTOFORO COLOMBO, RIGOLETTO, LA GIOCONDA, FAUST, ROMÉO ET JULIETTE AND LOHENGRIN.”


0630. ALICE VERLET: La Vièrge à la crèche (Périlhou). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28224, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0631. ALICE VERLET & ORPHÉE LANGEVIN: Le Crucifix (J. B. Faure). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28257. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

“Verlet made her début at the Opéra-Comique in 1894 as Philine in Thomas’ MIGNON. From that point forward, Verlet enjoyed a successful career, particularly in Francophone Europe. Her début at the Monnaie in Brussels took place on 7 September, 1901 in Verdi’s RIGOLETTO; she remained a member of that company for the balance of the season and later would make periodic appearances there. Her début at the Paris Opéra, as Blondine in a French-language production of Mozart’s DIE ENTFÜHRUNG AUS DEM SERAIL, came in 1903. She sang her first RIGOLETTO in that house on 11 April, 1904; Adelina Patti, who was in attendance, conspicuously displayed enthusiasm for Verlet’s singing. In 1905 and 1906, Verlet played the Naiad in the first modern revival of Gluck’s ARMIDE in Paris. Other cast members included Lucienne Bréval, Agustarello Affre, Dinh Gilly, and Geneviève Vix. Two years later, she was at the Théâtre de la Gaîté-Lyrique for a run of LAKMÉ with David Devriès and Félix Vieuille. Verlet made her London début as a participant in the Thomas Beecham Opera Comique Season at His Majesty’s Theater. As in her Paris Opera debut, the opera was DIE ENTFÜHRUNG AUS DEM SERAIL, but now Verlet played Constanze opposite Maggie Teyte as Blonde and Robert Radford as Osmin, all under Beecham’s baton.”


0632. GIOVANNI ZENATELLO & MARIE RAPPOLD: Aïda – La fatal pietra. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28259. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0633. REINALD WERRENRATH: Asthore. Edison 4-minute 602. This issue number is missing in G & B. Werrenrath’s sole cylinder! Exceptional copy has occasional very minor grey on peaks. MB 25

“In 1907 Werrenrath made his concert début at the Worchester Festival, and he then had a highly successful career as a concert and oratorio singer. After 1912 he was for many years the director of the University Heights Choral Society. In 1919 he made his stage début at the Metropolitan Opera as Silvio in PAGLIACCI. He remained a member of the Metropolitan until 1921. He appeared on Broadway in THE SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL (1923), THE BEAUX STRATAGEM (1928) and MUSIC IN THE AIR (1932)”


0634. FLORA WOLFF: Freudvoll und leidvoll (Liszt). Edison 2-minute 16173, in Orig. Box. Only form of issue. One of Wolff’s only five cylinders! Wolff was transported from Berlin to Terezin, 3 July, 1942, then to Treblinka on 19 September, where she died in 1943. Exceptional copy has sev. mildew spots, but plays beautifully. MB 35

0635. SOUSA’S BAND: Stars and Stripes forever (Sousa). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 2104. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 25

“Sousa held a very low opinion of the emerging and upstart recording industry. In a submission to a congressional hearing in 1906, he argued: ‘These talking machines are going to ruin the artistic development of music in this country. When I was a boy...in front of every house in the summer evenings, you would find young people together singing the songs of the day or old songs. Today you hear these infernal machines going night and day. We will not have a vocal cord left. The vocal cord will be eliminated by a process of evolution, as was the tail of man when he came from the ape.’ [John Philip Sousa,THE MENACE OF MECHANICAL MUSIC, 1906]. Law professor E. Lawrence Lessig cited this passage to argue that in creating a system of copyrights in which control of music is in the hands of record labels, Sousa was essentially correct . Sousa also was credited with referring to records as ‘canned music’, referring to the fact that cylinder records were sold in cans. Sousa’s antipathy to recording was such that he often refused to conduct his band if it was being recorded. Nevertheless, Sousa’s band made numerous recordings, the earliest being issued on cylinders by several companies, followed by many recordings on discs by the Berliner Gramophone Company and its successor, the Victor Talking Machine Company (later RCA Victor). The Berliner recordings were conducted by Henry Higgins (one of Sousa’s cornet soloists) and Arthur Pryor (Sousa’s trombone soloist and assistant conductor), with Sousa quoted as saying, ‘I have never been in the gramophone company’s office in my life’. A handful of the Victor recordings were actually conducted by Sousa, but most were conducted by Pryor, Herbert L. Clarke, Edwin H. Clarke, or by four of Victor’s most prolific house musicians: Walter B. Rogers (who had also been a cornet soloist with Sousa), Rosario Bourdon, Josef Pasternack, and Nathaniel Shilkret.”




0636. MARIE DRESSLER: Rastus, take me back (Hattie Starr). Edison 2-minute 13752, recorded 1909, New York; in Orig. Box. Excellent copy has hint of grey on peaks, hardly worth mention. MB 45

“Canadian-born Marie Dressler made her1892 début on Broadway. In vaudeville she was known for her full-figured body—fashionable at the time—and had buxom contemporaries such as her friends Lillian Russell, Fay Templeton, May Irwin and Trixie Friganza. Dressler appeared in a play called ROBBER OF THE RHINE which was written by Maurice Barrymore. Barrymore gave Dressler some positive advice about furthering her career….Years later she would appear with his sons, Lionel and John, in motion pictures. In addition to her stage work, Dressler recorded for Edison Records in 1909 and 1910. Dressler continued to work in the theater during the 1910s, and toured the United States during World War I, selling Liberty Bonds and entertaining the American Expeditionary Forces. After several years of oblivion, it was sound that made her a star again. ANNA CHRISTIE (1930) was the movie where Garbo talks, but everyone noticed Marie as Marthy. In an era of Harlow, Garbo and Crawford, it was homely old Marie Dressler that won the coveted exhibitor’s poll as the most popular actress for three consecutive years. In another film from the same year, MIN AND BILL (1930) she received a best actress Oscar for her dramatic performance. She received another Academy Award nomination for EMMA (1932). She had more success with DINNER AT EIGHT (1933) and TUGBOAT ANNIE (1933). Despite her age and weight, she became one of the top box office draws of the sound era. Once you saw her, you would not forget her.”


0637. VESTA TILLEY: I’m the idol of the girls (Lyle). Edison 2-minute 401, recorded May, 1908, London; only form of issue, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 45

“Tilley’s father was a comedy actor and sometimes theatre manager, and Tilley first appeared on stage at the age of three and a half. At the age of six she did her first rôle in male clothing under the name Pocket Sims Reeves, a parody of then-famous opera singer Sims Reeves. She would come to prefer doing male roles exclusively, saying that ‘I felt that I could express myself better if I were dressed as a boy’. At the age of eleven she débuted in London at the Canterbury Hall the name Vesta Tilley. ‘Vesta’ referred to a brand of safety matches, and ‘Tilley’ is a nickname for Matilda. Tilley began to be known for her singing of comic numbers and her popularity reached its all-time high point during World War I, when she and her husband ran a military recruitment drive, as did a number of other music-hall stars. In the guise of characters like ‘Tommy in the Trench’ and ‘Jack Tar Home from Sea’, Tilley performed songs like ‘The army of today’s all right’ and ‘Jolly Good Luck to the Girl who Loves a Soldier’. This is how she got the nickname Britain’s best recruiting sergeant - young men were sometimes asked to join the army on stage during her show. She was prepared to be a little controversial. Tilley made her last performance in 1920 at the Coliseum Theatre, London, at the age of 56. For the rest of her life she lived as Lady de Frece, moving to Monte Carlo with her husband upon his retirement. She moved back to England after her husband’s death in 1935.”


0638. DIGBY BELL: The tough kid on the right field fence. Edison 2-minute 156, only form of issue, 8 Feb., 1909, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

0639. DIGBY BELL: The blind boy in the gallery. Edison 2-minute 279, only form of issue, 8 Feb., 1909 (entirely different rendition from Bell’s Victor recording made several days later, 27 Feb., 1909), in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 35

“Bell studied in Europe to become a concert singer, and became famous for his rôles in comic musical productions, such as Gilbert and Sullivan comic operas and with the McCaull Comic Opera Company. His first starring rôle was in the musical JUPITER in 1892. He appeared many times with Lillian Russell in shows such as PRINCESS NICOTINE and THE GRAND DUCHESS OF GEROLSTEIN. He introduced the song ‘The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo’. Bell gave a concert a Chickering Hall in New York City on 26 April, 1878 that was favorably reviewed by the New York Times. Much of Bell’s later career was in nonmuscial plays or vaudeville.”


0640. HARRY LAUDER: She’s my Daisy. Edison 2-minute 12065, recorded July, 1911, London; only one of numerous recorded versions, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 25

0641. HARRY LAUDER: Just a wee deoch-an’-Doris. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1819, recorded June, 1912, London; only one of numerous recorded versions. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 25

“Lauder’s appeal was to all, from workers to merchants, royalty and presidents, His understanding of life, its pathos and joys, endeared him to all. Gigli and others commended his singing voice and clarity. Lauder usually performed in Highland regalia (Kilt, Sporran, Tam o’shanter and twisted walking stick) and singing songs with a Scottish theme. Lauder was in Melbourne on one of his Australian tours when World War I broke out. During the war, he led successful fundraising efforts for war charities, organised a tour of music halls in 1915 for recruitment purposes, and entertained the troops under enemy fire in France. By his efforts in organising concerts and appeals he raised £1,000,000 to help servicemen return to health and civilian life, for which we was knighted in 1919.”


0642. YVETTE GUILBERT: Le Fiacre (Xanrof). Pathé 3½” Concert-Size 1481. Only form of issue, recorded 1908, Paris. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 85

“Guilbert débuted at the Variette Théâtre in 1888. She eventually sang at the popular Eldorado club, then at the Jardin de Paris before headlining in Montmartre at the Moulin Rouge in 1890. For her act, she was usually dressed in bright yellow with long black gloves and stood almost perfectly still, gesturing with her long arms as she sang. An innovator, she favored monologue-like ‘patter songs’ (as they came to be called) and was often billed as a ‘diseuse’. The lyrics (some of them her own) were raunchy; their subjects were tragedy, lost love, and the Parisian poverty from which she had come. Taking her cue from the new cabaret performances, Guilbert broke and rewrote all the rules of music-hall with her audacious lyrics, and the audiences loved her. She was noted in France, England, and the United States at the beginning of the twentieth century for her songs and imitations of the common people of France. She was a favorite subject of artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, who made many portraits and caricatures of Guilbert and dedicated his second album of sketches to her. George Bernard Shaw wrote a review highlighting her novelty. Guilbert made successful tours of England and Germany, and the United States in 1895–1896. She performed at Carnegie Hall. Even in her fifties, her name still had drawing power and she appeared in several silent films (including a star turn in Murnau’s FAUST). She also appeared in talkies, including a rôle with friend, Sacha Guitry. Her recordings for Le Voix de Son Maitre include the famous ‘Le Fiacre’ as well as some of her own compositions such as ‘Madame Arthur’. She once gave a performance for the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII, at a private party on the French Riviera. Hostesses vied to have her at their parties. In later years, Guilbert turned to writing about the Belle Époque and in 1902 two of her novels were published. In the 1920’s there appeared her instructional book L’ART DE CHANTER UNE CHANSON (How to Sing a Song). She also conducted schools for young girls in New York and Paris. Guilbert became a respected authority on her country’s medieval folklore and on 9 July 1932 was awarded the Légion of Honor as the Ambassadress of French Song.”


0643. SOPHIE TUCKER: Phoebe Jane. Edison 2-minute 566, recorded Jan., 1911, New York, only form of issue. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 65

“Tucker was billed as ‘The Last of the Red Hot Mamas’, as her hearty sexual appetite was a frequent subject of her songs, unusual for female performers of the era. Sophie Tucker added jazz and sentimental ballads to her ragtime repertoire, and, in the 1930s, when American vaudeville was dying, she took to playing England. She made eight movies and appeared on radio and, as it became popular, television. Sophie Tucker became involved in union organizing with the American Federation of Actors, and was elected president of the organization in 1938. The AFA was eventually absorbed into its rival Actors’ Equity as the American Guild of Variety Artists. With her financial success, she was able to be generous to others, starting the Sophie Tucker foundation in 1945 and, in 1955, endowing a theater arts chair at Brandeis University. Her fame and popularity lasted more than fifty years; Sophie Tucker never retired, playing the Latin Quarter in New York only months before she died in 1966. Always partly self-parody, the core of her act remained earthy, suggestive songs, whether jazzy or sentimental, taking advantage of her enormous voice.”


0644. ARTHUR FIELDS: Madelon. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 3704. Excellent copy has hint of grey on peaks, hardly worth mention. MB 15

Arthur Fields was born Abraham (‘"Abe’) Finkelstein in Philadelphia, but grew up mainly in Utica, New York. He became a professional singer as a youngster. Around 1908 he toured with Guy Brother's Minstrel Show, and helped form a vaudeville act ‘Weston, Fields and Carroll’.


0645. BILLY MURRAY: Sister Susie’s sewing shirts for soldiers. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 2530, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 15

0646. BILLY MURRAY: Alexander’s Ragtime Band (Coon Song) (Irving Berlin). Edison 4-minute 817, in Orig. Box. Excellent copy has hint of grey on peaks, hardly worth mention. MB 15

“Billy Murray was one of the most popular singers in the United States in the early decades of the 20th century. While he received star billings in Vaudeville, he was best known for his prolific work in the recording studio, making records for almost every record label of the era. Through 1925, nobody else even came close; Murray outsold all other performers from the time of his breakout records in 1903 through to his retirement in 1943. Murray was also part of several of the most important early duos and ensembles making records. The team of Ada Jones and Billy Murray sold more records than any other duo in the acoustic period.

Nicknamed the ‘Denver Nightingale’, Murray had a strong tenor voice with excellent enunciation and a more conversational delivery than common with bel canto singers of the era. On comic songs he often deliberately sang slightly flat, which he felt helped the comic effect.”


0647. ADA JONES: Taffy. Edison 2-minute 934, in Orig. Box (numbered 10010). Excellent copy has hint of grey on peaks, hardly worth mention. MB 15

0648. ADA JONES: I’m looking for a nice young fellow who is looking for a nice young girl. Edison 4-minute 605, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 15

0649. ADA JONES: If I knock the ‘L’ out of Kelly. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 2940. Exceptional copy has sev. mildew spots, but plays beautifully. MB 15

0650. ADA JONES & BILLY MURRAY: Will you be my teddy bear? Edison 2-minute 9659 (announced, but names not on cylinder). Excellent copy has sev. mildew spots, but plays beautifully. MB 15

0651. ADA JONES & BILLY MURRAY: Cuddle up a little closer. Edison 2-minute 876. Excellent copy has hint of grey on peaks, hardly worth mention. MB 15

0652. ADA JONES & BILLY MURRAY: Oh, you silv’ry bells. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1800, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 15

0653. ADA JONES & LEN SPENCER: A race for a wife (A race track sketch). Edison 4-minute 335, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 15

0654. ADA JONES & LEN SPENCER: Little Arrow and big chief Greasepaint (Vaudeville sketch). Edison 4-minute 108, in Orig. Box. Excellent copy has hint of grey on peaks, hardly worth mention. MB 15

“Ada Jones was the leading female recording artist in the acoustic recording era, especially popular from 1905 to 1912 or so. Her singing range was limited but she was remarkably versatile, being successful with vaudeville sketches, sentimental ballads, hits from Broadway shows, British music hall material, ‘coon’ and ragtime songs, and Irish comic songs. She was known for an ability to mimic dialects.

She was born in her parents' home at 78 Manchester Street in Oldham, Lancashire, England…. The family moved to Philadelphia by 1879…. cash disbursement books at the Edison National Historic Site suggest Ada's stepmother had been hired to make or mend drapes for the Edison company. The Jones family at that time lived nearby in Newark, New Jersey. It is likely that at the studio she saw an opportunity for her talented stepdaughter. Ada's earliest recordings were brown wax cylinders made for Edison in late 1893 or early 1894….Presumably in the 1890s Jones developed as an entertainer. As a stage performer, she specialized in singing while colored slides were projected - it was the illustrated song's heyday. She evidently worked steadily and continued to be featured on sheet music covers but was by no means famous yet. She would win fame only through records--the first female to do so. Billy Murray reported that he was responsible for Jones making her Columbia recording début in 1904….’and she made just as big a hit with everybody else as she did with me...Some one has spread the impression that Ada Jones is in private life Mrs. Billy Murray. We are married but not to each other’.

In contrast to colleagues with various pseudonyms, she was issued only as Ada Jones. Also noteworthy is that she performed for a decade without rivals - that is, no singers of similar talents seriously threatened her popularity despite many comic female singers being introduced to record buyers from 1905 to 1915. Nora Bayes was more famous but this was due to stage successes--her early records did not sell well. Each singer's recorded output was minuscule compared with Jones'. Stage work, which often included touring on vaudeville circuits, undoubtedly prevented a few from cultivating recording careers whereas Jones in this period devoted all efforts towards making records.”


- Tim Gracyk, POPULAR AMERICAN RECORDING PIONEERS


0655. CAL STEWART: The opera at Pun’kin Center. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 3830. Excellent copy has hint of grey on peaks, hardly worth mention. MB 15

“Cal Stewart was a pioneer in vaudeville and early sound recordings. He is best remembered for his comic monologues in which he played ‘Uncle Josh’ Weathersby, a resident of a mythical New England farming town called ‘Punkin Center’.

It was on the road that he befriended Mark Twain and later Will Rogers, two men who shared similar wit in comedy. Around 1897, Thomas Edison's studios hired him to cut several cylinder recordings of his famous speeches and songs. They were well received by the public, and launched an entire series of recordings based on the Uncle Josh character. Stewart's trademark on these recordings are the easily recognizable laugh that precedes his speeches.”


0656. ORCHESTRA: Semiramide – Overture (Rossini). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1501. Excellent copy has hint of grey on peaks & 2 superficial mks, hardly worth mention. MB 8

0657. COLLINS & HARLAN: Alixander’s Ragtime Band. Edison 2-minute 3251. Excellent copy has hint of grey on peaks, hardly worth mention. MB 15 “Collins & Harlan, the team of Arthur Collins and Byron G. Harlan formed a popular comic duet between 1903 and 1926. They sang ragtime standards as well as what were known as ‘Coon songs’ - music sung by white performers in a black dialect. Their material also employed many other stereotypes of the time including Irishmen and farmers . Collins and Harlan produced many number one hits with recordings of minstrel songs. Their song ‘That Funny Jas Band from Dixieland’, recorded 8 November, 1916, is among first recorded uses of the word ‘Jas’, which eventually evolved from ‘jas’," to ‘jass’ to the current spelling ‘jazz’.”

0658. EDISON LIGHT OPERA COMPANY (Elizabeth Spencer, Mary Jordan, Harry Anthony, Walter van Brunt, James F. Harrison, & William F. Hooley): Der Bettelstudent – Potpourri (Millöcker. Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 2417. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 10

0659. EDISON LIGHT OPERA COMPANY: The Prince of Pilsen – Potpourri (Gilbert & Sullivan). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 2299. Excellent copy has hint of grey on peaks, hardly worth mention. MB 10

0660. EDISON LIGHT OPERA COMPANY: The Pirates of Penzance – Potpourri (Gilbert & Sullivan). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 2215. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 10

0661. EDISON LIGHT OPERA COMPANY: H.M.S. Pinafore – Potpourri #1 (Gilbert & Sullivan). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1890, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 12

0662. EDISON LIGHT OPERA COMPANY: H.M.S. Pinafore – Potpourri #3 (Gilbert & Sullivan). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1892, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 12

0663. EDISON LIGHT OPERA COMPANY: Il Trovatore – Anvil Chorus (Verdi). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 1989. Excellent copy has hint of grey on peaks & minuscule scr, hardly worth mention. MB 10

0664. EDISON LIGHT OPERA COMPANY: Messiah - Hallelujah Chorus (Handel). Edison 4-minute Blue Amberol 28232, in Orig. Box. M-A, a gleaming copy. MB 12

0665. ALBERT SPALDING: Scherzo -Tarantelle (Wieniawski). Edison 2-minute D 5, in Orig. Box. This issue number is missing in G & B. Very decent copy has lt.grey, but plays beautifully. MB 15