Let My People Come  (Libra LR1069)   Original Off-Broadwsay cast LP
Item# LP0235
$23.90
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Product Description

Let My People Come  (Libra LR1069)   Original Off-Broadwsay cast LP
LP0235. LET MY PEOPLE COME, Original 1974 Off-Broadway cast. Libra LR1069 (Original issue, before 'Cunnilingus Champion' was replaced with a different song, ‘Whatever Turns You On’.

CRITIC REVIEW:

“This musical opened off-Broadway in 1974. According to its creator, Earl Wilson Jr: ‘it is a musical revue about SEX... with some nudity and a lot of X-rated language. It was nominated for a Grammy in 1974 and has appeared all over the world. It is a really fun show that takes the attitude that everyone loves sex...when they are honest enough to admit it...and that we'd probably all be a lot better off if we were less uptight about it’. A review of the time said: ‘it broke all barriers - simulated sex, orgies, lesbianism, homosexuality, simulated oral sex, bisexuality, all celebrated, all hilariously carefree’.

LET MY PEOPLE COME opened at the Village Gate Theater on Bleecker Street in Greenwich Village, New York. The show broke all box office records at the Village Gate and played for 1,167 performances. One of the show's songs,’The Cunnilingus Champion of Company C’, was the subject of a copyright infringement lawsuit by MCA Music in 1976 (MCA Music v. Earl Wilson). They claimed copyright infringement and wrongful appropriation of their copyrighted song, ‘Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy’. Earl Wilson Jr claimed that the song was a parody or burlesque on ‘Bugle Boy’ and that any similarity between the two songs was permissible fair use. The court disagreed, arguing that ‘Cunnilingus Champion’ could not be construed as a parody of ‘Bugle Boy’ specifically but was instead a vehicle for a broad burlesque of the 1940s, World War II activity, and in particular the sexual mores and taboos of the time. Later pressings of this album replaced 'Cunnilingus Champion' with a different song, ‘Whatever Turns You On’.

- Ned Ludd