PERSONALITY, POPULAR & JAZZ  VOCAL  78RPM  RECORDS:  G1568  –  G1627
Regarding AUCTION #143 (Closing Date: Saturday, 8 May, 2010), The Minimum Bid ("MB") is a guide which has been set in accordance with current market value, determined through constant monitoring of auction sales during recent years. In cases of extreme rarity, the actual realized price may far exceed the Minimum Bid, while in other cases an item may realize a price very close to the Minimum Bid, and, occasionally, the Minimum Bid itself. Please simply bid in accordance with whatever a given item means to you.

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G1568 – G1627 ARE PERSONALITY, POPULAR & JAZZ VOCAL 78RPM RECORDS.

G1568. LOTTE LENJA: Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny – Alabama-Song (in English) / Denn wie man sich bettet (in German) (Brecht-Weill). 10” EL black Homocord 4–3671 (H-62611/12), only form of issue, 1930. B, decent copy has lt. rubs & scrs, occasionally audible. MB 15

G1569. LOTTE LENJA, w.Theo Mackeben Jazz Orch.: Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny – Alabama-Song (in English) / Denn wie man sich bettet (in German) (Brecht-Weill). 10” EL dark-blue Ultraphon A 371 (10710/11), only form of issue, 24 Feb., 1930. A-, very decent copy has lt. rubs & superficial mks, inaud. MB 15

G1570. LOTTE LENJA, w.Hans Soomer Cond.: Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny – Potpourri (Brecht-Weill), 2s. 12” EL plum PW Electrola EH 736, POM-1932. A to M-A, beautiful copy has faintest pap. rubs, inaud. MB 15

G1571. LOTTE LENJA, w.Theo Mackeben Jazz Orch.: Happy End – Suabaya-Jonny / Bilbao-Song (Brecht-Weill). 8” EL dark-green German Orchestrola 2311 (A 8717/18), only form of issue, 1929. A-, very decent copy has lt. rubs & pap. mks, inaud. Most Elusive, these Orchestrola issues were pressed in extremely limited numbers! MB 25

“Lotte Lenya was born in 1898 in Vienna, moving to Berlin to seek work in 1921. In 1922 Lenya was seen by her future husband, the German composer Kurt Weill, during an audition for his first stage score Zaubernacht, but she declined the rôle. She accepted the part of Jenny in the first performance of DIE DREIGROSCHENOPER in 1928 and the part became her breakthrough rôle. During the last years of the Weimar Republic, she was busy in film and theatre, and especially in Brecht-Weill plays. She also made several recordings of Weill's songs. With the rise of Nazism in Germany, she left the country.

Sprechstimme was used in some famous songs in the Brecht-Weill plays, but later Lenya used it even more to compensate for the shortcomings of her voice. Lenya was aware of this as a problem; in other contexts she was very careful about fully respecting her late husband's scores. In 1956, Lotte Lenya won a Tony Award for her rôle as Jenny in Blitzstein's somewhat softened version of THE THREEPENNY OPERA, which played off-Broadway at the Theater de Lys in Greenwich Village for a total of 2,707 performances. Blitzstein had translated the work into English; Lenya, Weill's wife since the 1920s, had sung both Jenny and Polly earlier in Germany. The production was important in New York's musical theatre history as it showed that musicals could be profitable off-Broadway in a small-scale, small orchestra format. In 1966, Lenya originated the rôle of Fräulein Schneider in the original Broadway cast of the musical CABARET. Kander's and Ebb's score was inspired by Weill's music, so Lenya was considered a particularly appropriate casting choice.”

G1572. CAROLA NEHER, w.Theo Mackeben Jazz Orch.: Die Dreigroschenoper – Barbara-Song / Die Seeräuberjenny (Brecht-Weill). 8” EL dark-green German Orchestrola 2132 (A 8475/76), only form of issue, 1929. A, lovely copy has faintest pap. rubs, inaud. Most Elusive, these Orchestrola issues were pressed in extremely limited numbers! MB 25

“In 1926 Neher went to Berlin to work with Bertolt Brecht. He wrote the rôle of Polly Peachum [for Neher] in DIE DREIGROSCHENOPER, but late in rehearsals her husband died, thus she was therefore unable to appear at the première, but acted the rôle of Polly in subsequent performances. Brecht wrote several roles for her and she embodied and immortalized Polly in G.W. Pabst's film of DIE DREIGROSCHENOPER.

In 1932 she married Anatol Becker and left Germany after Adolf Hitler's ascension to power in spring 1933. She first emigrated to Prague, where she worked at the New German Theater, but went on to the Soviet Union in 1934. Here she met Gustav von Wangenheim and worked with him at his German language Cabaret ‘Kolonne links’. In 1936, throughout the Stalinist Great Purge, Wangenheim denounced Neher and her husband Anatol Becker as Trotskyites; she was arrested on July 25, 1936. Becker was executed in 1937; Neher was sentenced to ten years in prison and died in a Gulag near Orenburg on26 June, 1942. Her fate caused protests among other emigrants outside the Soviet Union, especially as Bertolt Brecht did not aid her.”

G1573. CAROLA NEHER, KURT GERRON & ARTHUR SCHRÖDER: Die Dreigroschenoper – Potpourri (Brecht-Weill)., 2s 12” EL plum PW Electrola EH 301, POM-1929. M-A, gleaming copy has, Sd. 1 only, mere hint of nr, inaud. MB 15

“Kurt Gerron was a German Jewish actor and film director. He appeared in such films as THE BLUE ANGEL opposite Marlene Dietrich, and on stage originated the rôle of Brown (the chief of police in London) in the première production of DIE DREIGROSCHENOPER in Berlin in 1928. Gerron was offered a trip to Hollywood but refused and stayed behind in Europe. He later left Germany, traveling first to France and later to the Netherlands. There, he kept on working as an actor and director in several movies. After the German army occupied the Netherlands, he was interned in the transit camp at Westerbork before being sent to Theresienstadt concentration camp. There he ran a cabaret called The Karussell to entertain the inmates. In 1944, Gerron was either persuaded or coerced by the Nazis to make a propaganda film showing how humane the conditions were at Theresienstadt. After shooting finished, Gerron was deported on the camp's final transport to Auschwitz. He was murdered immediately upon arrival.”

G1574. COMEDIAN HARMONISTS: Hallo, was machst du heut, Daisy! (Donaldson) / Ich hab dich lieb, Braune Madonna (Rotter). 10” EL plum PW Electrola EG 2435, POM-1931. A, lovely copy has lt. rubs, inaud. Sd. 1 is particularly enchanting and delightful! MB 15

G1575. COMEDIAN HARMONISTS: Hunderttausendmal (Green) / Mein lieber Schatz, bist du aus Spanien (Santeugini). 10” EL plum PW Electrola EG 2405, POM-1931. A to M-A MB 15

G1576. COMEDIAN HARMONISTS: Wochenend und Sonnenschein (Happy days are here again (Ager) / Veronika, der Lenz ist da (Jurmann). 10” EL plum PW Electrola EG 2033, POM-22 Aug., 1930. A to M-A MB 15 G1577. COMEDIAN HARMONISTS: Auf Wiedersehen, my dear (Ager) / Das Lied einer Nacht – Heute Nacht oder nie (Spoliansky). 10” EL plum PW Electrola EG 2606, POM-1932. A to M-A MB 12

G1578. COMEDIAN HARMONISTS: Das Lied vom Leben – Baby (Holländer) / Ihre majestät die Liebe – Du bist nicht die erste (Jurmann). 10” EL plum PW Electrola EG 2238, POM-1931. A-, lovely copy has faintest pap. rubs, inaud.; beg. Sd. 2 only has wee scr, positively inaud. MB 12

G1579. COMEDIAN HARMONISTS: Gassenhauer – Marie, Marie! / Hof-Serenade (both Roland). 10” EL plum PW Electrola EG 2204, POM-19 Jan., 1931. A-, lovely copy has faintest pap. rubs, inaud.; Sd. 1 only has faint nr, positively inaud. MB 12

G1580. COMEDIAN HARMONISTS: Gassenhauer – Marie, Marie! / Hof-Serenade (both Roland). 10” EL plum PW HMV B.3862, POM-19 Jan., 1931. M-A MB 10

“The Comedian Harmonists were an internationally famous, all-male German close harmony ensemble that performed between 1927 and 1934 as one of the most successful musical groups in Europe before World War II. The hallmark of the Comedian Harmonists was its members' ability to blend their voices together so that the individual singers could appear and disappear back into the vocal texture. Delightful, joyous interpretations of classical and popular standards of the day are the fare of the quintet. A light piano accompaniment is provided by the sixth member who was also the arranger. Founded in 1927, they peaked in 1930-1932 before their three Jewish members became the focus of Nazi hatred. The Nazis progressively made the group's professional life more difficult, initially banning pieces by Jewish composers, and finally prohibiting them from performing in public. The group's last concert was in Munich on March 25, 1934.”

G1581. LALE ANDERSEN, w.Seidler-Winkler Cond.: Lili Marlen (Lied eines jungen Wachtpostens) / Drei rote Rosen (Gedenken) (both Schultze). 10” EL plum HMV EG 6993, POM-2 Aug., 1939. M-A MB 15

“From 1933 to 1937 Lale Andersen performed at the Schauspielhaus in Zürich, where she also met Rolf Liebermann who would remain a close friend for the rest of her life. In 1938, she was in Munich at the cabaret Simpl, and soon afterwards joined the prestigious Kabarett der Komiker in Berlin. While at the Kabarett der Komiker, she met Norbert Schultze, who had just written the music for ‘Lili Marleen’. Andersen recorded the song in 1939, not initially a success, but on 18 August, 1941, a German shortwave radio station in Belgrade happened to include Andersen’s recording in its program directed to Rommel’s troops in Africa, and the song became an immediate hit. Marlene Dietrich, among others, subsequently sang it. In the United States, the title is spelled ‘Lilli Marleen’. Nevertheless, Nazi officials did not like the sad song about parted lovers, and Joseph Goebbels prohibited its being played on the radio. Andersen was not allowed to perform publicly for nine months, not just because of the song but also because of her friendship with Rolf Liebermann, who was Jewish, and other Jewish artists she had met in Zürich. In desperation, she attempted to commit suicide. When she was allowed to perform again, it was only subject to several conditions, one of which was she would not sing ‘Lili Marleen’. Goebbels did order her to make new ‘military’ version of the song (with a significant drum) which was recorded in June, 1942. In the remaining war years, Andersen had one minor appearance in a propaganda movie and was made to sing several propaganda songs in English.” - (partially) James J. Fuld, THE BOOK OF WORLD-FAMOUS MUSIC, pp.331-32

G1582. MAHALIA JACKSON: Prayer changes things (Haines) / Walk with me. 10” green Apollo 217, only form of issue, 21 July, 1949. A-, very decent copy has lt. rubs, inaud.; alas, very fine hlc. MB 8

G1583. MAHALIA JACKSON: He’s the one / I’m getting nearer my home.. 10” vinyl green Apollo 258, only form of issue, 11 Sept., 1950. A to M-A, lovely copy has, Sd. 1 only, lt. rub, inaud. MB 15

G1584. MAHALIA JACKSON: Said He would (He calmed the ocean) / God spoke to me. 10” vinyl green Apollo 269, only form of issue, 21 March, 1952. A-, very decent copy has lt. scuffs, inaud. MB 12

“In 1950 Mahalia Jackson became the first gospel singer to perform at Carnegie Hall. She started touring Europe in 1952 and was hailed by critics as the ‘world's greatest gospel singer’. In Paris she was called the ‘Angel of Peace’, and throughout the continent she sang to capacity audiences. Jackson's career in the late 1950s and early 1960s continued to rise. She began a radio series on CBS and signed to Columbia Records in 1954. Down Beat music magazine stated on 17 November, 1954: ‘It is generally agreed that the greatest spiritual singer now alive is Mahalia Jackson’."

G1585. BESSIE SMITH: Nobody in town can bake a sweet jellyroll like mine / If you don’t, I know who will (both Clarence Williams). 10” AC blue Col. A3942, POM-22 June, 1923. A-B, very decent copy has rubs throughout, inaud. MB 15

G1586. BESSIE SMITH: Sam Jones’ blues / St. Louis gal (both Robinson). 10” AC gold Flags Label Col. 13005-D, only form of issue, 24 Sept., 1923. B, decent copy has rubs throughout, inaud. & few lt. scrs, ltly audible. MB 20

G1587. BESSIE SMITH: The bye bye blues / Weeping willow blues (both Carter). 10” AC gold Flags Label Col. 14042-D, POM-26 Sept., 1924. C/C-, playable copy has heavy rubs throughout; Sd. 2 only has various heavy scrs & 1 sticking groove, positively audible. MB 10

G1588. BESSIE SMITH: Preachin’ the blues / Thinking blues. 10” EL blue, gold & white Parl. R 2483 (143490/145626), POM-17 Feb., 1927 / 9 Feb., 1928. A to M-A, lovely copy has, Sd. 2 only, few superficial mks, positively inaud. MB 15

G1589. BESSIE SMITH: Do your duty / I’m down in the dumps. 10” EL blue, gold & white Parl. R 1793 (152577/80), POM-24 Nov., 1933. A to M-A, lovely copy has few superficial mks, positively inaud. MB 15 G1590. BESSIE SMITH: Money blues (Eller) / Muddy water (Trent). 10” EL blue, gold & white Parl. R 2478 (21871/43), POM-4 May, 1926 / 2 March, 1927. M-A MB 15

G1591. BESSIE SMITH: Weeping willow blues (Carter) / Careless love blues (W.C. Handy). 10” AC / EL blue, gold & white Parl. R 2479 (21837/22), POM-26 Sept., 1924 / 26 May, 1925. M-A, lovely copy has, Sd. 2 only, mere hint of grey on peaks, inaud. MB 15

G1592. BESSIE SMITH: In the house – blues / Seven Gallon Jug Band: Wipe ‘em off. 10” EL dark-blue Parl. R 2329 (151594/149690), POM-11 June, 1931 / 3 Jan., 1930. A-, lovely copy has, Sd. 1 only, few wee dust scrs, ever-so-faintly audible a very few turns at end; Sd. 2 only has sev. wee scuffs, positively inaud. MB 15

G1593. BESSIE SMITH: St Louis blues (W.C. Handy) / Cold in hand blues. 10” AC dark-blue Parl. R 2344 (140241/50), POM-14 Jan., 1925. A-B, lovely copy has lt. rubs & few superficial scrs, inaud. MB 15

G1594. BESSIE SMITH: St Louis blues (W.C. Handy) / Reckless blues (Gee). 10” AC early PW Col. 3171-D (21821/38), POM-14 Jan., 1925. A-, very decent copy has lt. rubs & very few superficial mks, positively inaud.; Sd. 1 only has long faint lateral lam, positively inaud. Remarkably quiet surfaces. MB 15

G1595. BESSIE SMITH: At the Christmas ball (Longshaw) / Preachin’ the blues. 10” EL red PW Col. 35842, (141283/143490), POM-18 Nov., 1925 / 17 Feb., 1927. A to M-A, lovely copy has, Sd. 1 only, few entirely superficial dust mks, inaud. MB 15

G1596. BESSIE SMITH: Baby doll / Lost your head blues. 10” EL red PW Col. 35674, (142147/27487), POM-4 May, 1926. M-A, lovely copy has, Sd. 2 only, few entirely superficial dust mks, inaud. MB 15

G1597. BESSIE SMITH: Do your duty / I’m down in the dumps (both Wilson). 10” EL white & blue PW Commodore UHCA 47/48, (152577/80), POM-24 Nov., 1933. M-A, lovely copy has, Sd. 1 only, few entirely superficial dust mks, inaud. MB 15

G1598. BESSIE SMITH: Gimme a pigfoot / Take me for a buggy ride (both Wilson). 10” EL white & blue PW Commodore UHCA 49/50, (152578/79), POM-24 Nov., 1933. A-/M-A, lovely copy has, Sd. 1 only, sev. lt scrs, ever-so-faintly audible the occasional turn. MB 15

G1599. BESSIE SMITH: After you’ve gone / A good man is hard to find. 10” EL vinyl yellow Hot Jazz Club of America HC 65, RRs-2 March / 27 Sept., 1927. A to M-A, lovely copy has faintest pap. rubs, inaud. MB 8

G1600. BESSIE SMITH: Squeeze me (Waller) / Jazzbo Brown from Memphis Town (Brooks). 10” EL vinyl yellow Hot Jazz Club of America HC 81, RRs-5 / 18 March, 1926. M-A MB 10

G1601. BESSIE SMITH: Shipwreck blues / Long old road. 10” EL vinyl yellow Hot Jazz Club of America HC 62, RRs-11 June, 1931. A/A-B, very decent copy has lt. rubs, inaud.; Sd. 2 only has scuffs & few dust scrs, ltly audible. MB 8

“In 1920, sales figures for ‘Crazy Blues’, an Okeh Records recording by singer Mamie Smith (no relation) pointed to a new market. The recording industry had not directed its product to blacks, but the success of the record led to a search for female blues singers. Bessie Smith was signed by Columbia Records in 1923 and her first session for Columbia was 15 February, 1923. For most of 1923, her records were issued on Columbia's regular A- series; when the label decided to establish a ‘race records’ series, Smith's ‘Cemetery Blues’ (26 September, 1923) was the first issued. Bessie Smith made some 160 recordings for Columbia, often accompanied by the finest musicians of the day, most notably Louis Armstrong, James P. Johnson, Joe Smith, Charlie Green and Fletcher Henderson.”

G1602. GREEK EVANS: Homeward bound (Meyer) / Over the top (Wells & Wendling). 10” AC blue Col. A2423, only form of issue, 4 Oct., 1917. A to M-A, lovely copy has faintest pap. rubs, inaud. MB 8

G1603. GREEK EVANS: Our country’s in it now (Morgan) / EDDIE NELSON: Oh! How I hate to get up in the morning (Irving Berlin). 8” AC dark-blue Emerson 970, only form of issue, 1918. A-, very decent copy has lt pap. rubs, & few wee scrs, inaud. MB 10

G1604. GREEK EVANS: The clang of the forge (Rodney) / REED MILLER: The maid of the mill (Adams). 10” AC H & D dark-blue Okeh 1013, only form of issue, 1918; Greek Evans’ sole listing in Girard & Barnes. A-, very decent copy has lt pap. rubs, inaud. MB 10

G1605. GREEK EVANS: Because you believe in me (Ball) / Stirling Trio: Alice, I’m in Wonderland (Morse). 10” AC H & D dark-blue Okeh 1059, only form of issue, 1918. A-, very decent copy has lt pap. rubs, inaud. MB 10

G1606. GREEK EVANS, w.Victor Herbert Cond.: Eileen – Free trade and a misty moon / SCOTT WELSH: The Irish have a great day tonight (both Cond. by the Composer). 10” AC black V 18285, only form of issue, 5 April, 1917. A, lovely copy has faintest pap. rubs, inaud. (all-Creator Record, 19 March, 1917, Schubert Theatre, New York). MB 12

“Not long after Greek Evans recorded this robust hit from EILEEN for the number one record company (accompanied by the show's composer, Victor Herbert), Greek descended to the number two label (Columbia), then to Okeh, then to Emerson, and finally to lowly Olympic. - Tim Brooks

G1607. EDITH DAY: Irene – Irene / Alice blue gown (Tierney). 10” AC blue V 45176, POM-2 Feb., 1920. A to M-A, lovely copy has, Sd. 1 only, 2 infinitesimal pap. mks, inaud. (Creator Record, 18 Nov., 1919, Vanderbilt Theatre, New York). Edith Day’s sole USA issue (since she left permanently for London shortly after the close of IRENE). MB 12 G1608. ROGER HARDING: A stage struck coon. 10” AC black flush label Victor Monarch 850 (3453), only form of issue, 10 June, 1901, Announced. B-, decent copy has rubs & various lt. mks. MB 25

G1609. EDWARD M. FAVOR: She lisped when she said yes. 10” AC black flush label Eldridge R. Johnson Monarch 3280, only form of issue, 25 April, 1901, Announced. B-, decent copy has considerable rubs & scrs; heavy nd is very ltly audible a few turns; enlarged spindle hole. MB 20

G1610. SILAS LEACHMAN: Don’t you hear dem bells? 10” AC black flush label Monarch 803, (being ‘Take’ 5 [of various issued ‘takes’]), only form of issue, 6 Dec., 1901. B, very decent copy has rubs & various lt. mks. This realized a pressing of only 635 copies, returned to factory 12 Feb., 1902. MB 25

G1611. SILAS LEACHMAN: Quit that tickling me. 10” AC black flush label Victor Monarch 1129, only form of issue, 7 Dec., 1901, Announced. A-, very decent copy has lt. rubs & various lt. mks. MB 25

G1612. COLLINS & HARLAN: A sail on the tail of a whale (von Tilzer). 10” AC black Victor Monarch 4214 (B-1964), (being ‘Take’ 3 [of two issued ‘takes’]), POM-22 Nov., 1904. B, very decent copy has lt rubs & scrs. MB 15

G1613. COLLINS & HARLAN: Bye-bye, ma Eva (Helf). 10” AC black GP V 4505 (B-2761), (presumably being ‘Take’ 1 [of various issued ‘takes’]), only form of issue, 19 Sept., 1905. A-B, very decent copy has lt rubs. MB 15

G1614. HARLAN & STANLEY: An evening call in Jayville Centre. 10” AC black GP V 4475 (B-2579), (being ‘Take’ 4 [of various issued ‘takes’]), only form of issue, 26 May, 1905. A-B, very decent copy has lt rubs & scrs. MB 20

G1615. SPENCER & GIRARD: Daybreak at Calamity Farm. 10” AC black flush label Monarch 1381, only form of issue, 9 May, 1902, Announced. B, very decent copy has lt. rubs & various lt. mks.; an extra drilled hole thru label. Hysterically funny barnyard imitations. MB 20

G1616. GEORGE P. WATSON: Hi-le, hi-lo (German hunter’s song). 7” AC black flush label Eldridge R. Johnson Victor A-675, only form of issue, 15 Feb., 1901, Announced. B, decent copy has rubs & various lt. mks. This realized a pressing of only 749 copies, returned to factory as early as 8 Oct., 1901. MB 25

G1617. HARRY MACDONOUGH: When the harvest days are over (von Tilzer). 7” AC black flush label Eldridge R. Johnson Victor A-652, only form of issue, 6 Feb., 1901, Announced. A-B, very decent copy has rubs & various lt. mks. MB 25

G1618. HARRY MACDONOUGH: Fare thee well, Molly darling. 10” AC black flush label Monarch 1656, (being ‘Take’ 2 [of various issued ‘takes’]), only form of issue, 2 Oct., 1902, Announced. A-B, very decent copy has rubs & various lt. mks. This realized a pressing of only 200 copies, returned to factory as early as 6 Nov., 1902. MB 25

G1619. HARRY MACDONOUGH: The maiden with the dreamy eyes (Cole). 7” AC black V 1353, only form of issue, 8 April, 1902. B, very decent copy has lt rubs & sev. faint nrs. MB 20

G1620. MACDONOUGH & STANLEY: Tho’ your sins may be as scarlet (Doane). 10” AC black GP V 4516 (B-2530), (being ‘Take’ 3 [of various issued ‘takes’]), only form of issue, 8 May, 1905. A-B, very decent copy has lt rubs. MB 20

G1621. WALTER B. ROGERS Cond. Victor Orch. & Chorus: The Darkies’ Jubilee (pastimes on the levee) (Turner). 10” AC black GP V 5371 (B-4762), POM-5 Aug., 1907. A-B, very decent copy has lt rubs. This issue number is missing in Fagan & Moran. Remarkably resonant recording. MB 15

G1622. ARTHUR PRYOR’S BAND Darkies’ Spring Song (Ragtime Two-Step) (van Alstyne). 10” AC black GP V 5395 (B-4820), (presumably being ‘Take’ 1 [of two issued ‘takes’]), POM-19 Sept., 1907. A-B, very decent copy has lt rubs & faint mks. MB 15

G1623. PRINCE’S MILITARY BAND: Pirates of Penzance – Potpourri (Sullivan). 7” AC black & silver flush label Col. 542, only form of issue, 1902. A-B, very decent copy has sl. steeled grooves, yet plays remarkably well; uncommonly bright label. MB 20

G1624. SOUSA’S BAND (presumably Henry Higgins, Cond., although Arthur Pryor’s name embossed in shellac): Loreley (Nesvabda). 7” AC etched label Berliner 130, only form of issue, 28 May, 1898. A-, lovely copy has very lt. rubs, inaud. MB 45

G1625. WALTER DAMROSCH ORCH.: Carmen – Chanson du Torréador / Orquesta Méxicana de Curti: La Boheme – O soave fanciulla. 10” AC black Col. A137, POM-1903/’04, resp. A-, lovely copy has few lt. rubs, inaud. Most probably, Damrosch’s sole recording from this period. MB 20

G1626. GEORGE GERSHWIN: Tip-Toes – Sweet and low down / Looking for a boy (Played by the Composer). 10” EL dark-blue PW Eng. Col. 4065, POM-6 July, 1926, London. B/B-, decent copy has, primarily Sd. 2, lt. rubs & scrs, positively audible; Sd. 2 only has cut groove which ticks ltly twice. MB 10

G1627. PETERSON’S HOBO Orch.: Submarine waltz (Winter) / From Frisco to Cape Cod – Waltz. 10” EL Orth Canadian V 20677, only form of issue, 1 April, 1927. A-, very decent copy has lt. rubs & hint of grey on peaks, inaud. MB 10

“Olle I. Skratthult (Hjalmar Peterson) was a Swedish-American vaudeville artist who achieved great popularity during the 1910s and 1920s. Arriving in the United States in 1906, Hjalmar Peterson eventually settled in Minneapolis. In 1909 he returned to Sweden as a member of The Swedish-American Quartet, and during its two-year tour he gathered the songs, stories and jokes he would later use as a solo performer. Back in America, Peterson adopted the stage name Olle I. Skratthult (Olle from Laughtersville) and began performing on the Scandinavian-language vaudeville circuit. Olle was a bondkomiker (peasant comic), and he dressed the part with a blacked-out tooth and straw-colored wig. Between 1916 and 1929, he recorded 46 songs, primarily for Columbia and Victor Records. In addition his Hobo Orchestra recorded 18 instrumental tracks for Victor.”