Barbier von Bagdad    (Keilberth;  Schock)   (2-Gebhardt 0048)
Item# OP0031
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Barbier von Bagdad    (Keilberth;  Schock)   (2-Gebhardt 0048)
OP0031. DER BARBIER VON BAGDAD (Cornelius), recorded 1951, w.Keilberth Cond. Kölner Rundfunks Ensemble; Schock, Schlemm, Böhme, Schmitt-Walter, etc. (Germany) 2-Gebhardt 0048. Long out-of-print, final copies! - 4035122000481

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“Joseph Keilberth was a German conductor active during the mid-twentieth century. His talents developed early: he pursued a general education and musical training in Karlsruhe, and at the age of seventeen joined the Karlsruhe State Theater as a répétiteur (vocal coach - a common starting place for European conductors). He remained with the theater and ten years later he was appointed general music director

He remained there until 1940, when he was appointed chief conductor of the German Philharmonic Orchestra of Prague. He became chief conductor of the Dresden State Opera in 1945. With a minimum of disruption for deNazification he remained in that position until 1950. In 1949 he became chief conductor of the Bamberg Symphony Orchestra, which was in fact a reunion. After the War, the German population of the Sudetenland (the German-speaking part of Czechoslovakia), which had been the excuse for Hitler's occupation of the country, were returned to Germany, and with them went the German Philharmonic of Prague, Keilberth's old orchestra, which settled in Bamberg. Causing unwary biographers some confusion, he also became the chief conductor of the Hamburg Philharmonic in 1950.

He frequently appeared as a guest conductor elsewhere in Germany, notably with the Berlin Philharmonic and, beginning in 1952, the Bayreuth Festival, and appeared regularly at the Salzburg and Lucerne festivals. In 1952 he also led his first performance in the Edinburgh Festival with the Hamburg State Opera.

He was a favored conductor for the RING and other operas through 1956. In 1959 he succeeded Ferenc Fricay at the helm of the Bavarian State Opera in Munich. There, history repeated itself. Keilberth died after collapsing during a performance of Wagner's TRISTAN UND ISOLDE, just as Felix Mottl—conductor at the same theater - had done in 1911.

Keilberth was very strong in Mozart and in the Wagnerian repertory, and in later German classics such as Pfitzner, Bruckner, Richard Strauss, Max Reger, and Paul Hindemith. His classic recordings included Hindemith's opera CARDILLAC.”

- Joseph Stevenson, allmusic.com



“Rudolf Johann Schock was a German tenor who sang a wide repertoire from operetta to LOHENGRIN, recording among others opera and lieder, doing television, radio and film work. Slim and handsome, he made many films. His voice fell almost into the heldentenor fach but was smaller and more ‘ingratiating’ than many voices in that category.[ Colored distinctly with a rich baritonal quality, Schock is described by Grove as a ‘lyric tenor’ with a warm flexible voice, and a ‘strong top voice’ which suited him to ‘heroic rôles’.

When he was 18 and still continuing his musical studies that took him to Cologne, Hanover and Berlin, Schock joined the opera chorus at Theater Duisburg in the city of his birth. The Staatstheater Braunschweig cast Schock in solo roles in 1937, but his career was interrupted by his being enlisted into the army in 1940. It resumed after the war in 1945 in Hanover. In 1946, he appeared with two of the Berlin-based opera companies and in 1947 he joined the Hamburg State Opera where he was a member until 1956.

Schock was one of the first Germans to sing at Covent Garden in 1949, appearing as Rodolfo, Alfredo, Pinkerton and Tamino in his first season. He sang the title role at IDOMENEO at the Salzburg Festival and took part in the premiere there of Rolf Liebermann's, PENELOPE and the Vienna State Opera's first staging of LULU. Schock made repeat visits to the Edinburgh International Festival and sang Walther at Bayreuth in 1959.

In 1953 he played and sang the role of Richard Tauber in the film DU BIST DIE WELT FÜR MICH (released in English-speaking countries as either YOU ARE THE WORLD FOR ME or THE RICHARD TAUBER STORY). He was often compared to the older tenor and was spoken of as his successor. He was also considered the most successful German film singer of his generation. He sold over 3 million records and his German films made him almost a superstar of his day. Schock's most impressive performances include the roles of Paul in DIE TOTE STADT (Korngold), and multiple Puccini principals.

Schock also interested himself in the development of younger singers by judging vocal competitions. After discovering Karl Ridderbusch at one of these, Schock part-funded the bass's musical training. Rudolf Schock continued making concert appearances into his sixties.”

-Zillah Dorset Akron