Der Ring des Nibelungen  (Knappertsbusch;  Hotter, Uhde, Windgassen, Greindl, Varnay) (13-Music & Arts 1009)
Item# OP0043
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Product Description

Der Ring des Nibelungen  (Knappertsbusch;  Hotter, Uhde, Windgassen, Greindl, Varnay) (13-Music & Arts 1009)
OP0043. DER RING DES NIBELUNGEN, Live Performance, 1956, w. Knappertsbusch Cond. Bayreuth Ensemble; Hans Hotter, Herrmann Uhde, Wolfgang Windgassen, Josef Greindl, Gre Brouwenstijn, Astrid Varnay, etc. 13-Music & Arts 1009. Transfers by Maggi Payne. Superlative sound! Final Copy! - 017685400926

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"As for Knappertsbusch, this RING may be his crowning achievement on disc....There is a sweep and grandeur to the whole, but that sweep is the result of carefully thought-through decisions over the 15-hour span of these scores. It is the result of balancing of textures, a rich palette of colors, and a sustained intensity of tone that the conductor calls forth from his players....this set is an extraordinarily important release....the sound is superb (accurately conveying the warmth of the Bayreuth acoustic, and its natural balance) - as good as many monaural studio recordings from the 1950s."

- Henry Fogel, FANFARE, March/April, 1998





"Varnay, gripping throughout, delivers Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene as if to sake her claim on immortality...."

- Matthew Gurwitsch, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 19 March, 2000





“The most important singer of the German Heldentenor repertory in the 1950s and 1960s, Wolfgang Windgassen employed his not-quite-heroic instrument, believable physique, and considerable musical intelligence to forge memorable performances on-stage and in the recording studio.

The tenor made his début as Alvaro in LA FORZA DEL DESTINO at Pforzheim in 1941. In 1945, he joined the Württembergisches Staatstheater in Stuttgart, steadily moving from lyric rôles to more heroic parts; he remained a singer there until 1972. Upon making his début in the first postwar season at Bayreuth in 1951, he came to international attention. His Parsifal, growing from uncomprehending innocence to maturity and service, was a moving portrayal and was recorded live by Decca Records. Windgassen became indispensable at the Bayreuth Festival, excelling as Lohengrin, the two Siegfrieds, Tannhäuser, and Tristan. There, he earned the respect and devotion of the three leading dramatic sopranos of the age: Martha Mödl, Astrid Varnay, and Birgit Nilsson. Elsewhere, Windgassen made positive impressions at La Scala (where he débuted as Florestan in 1952), Paris (Parsifal in 1954), and Covent Garden, where he appeared as Tristan in 1954. Although regarded by English critics as somewhat light of voice for Wagner's heaviest tenor rôles, his lyric expression and dramatic aptness were wholly admired. The Metropolitan Opera briefly heard him as Siegmund beginning in January 1957 and as Siegfried. Windgassen did not return to America until 1970, when he sang Tristan to the Isolde of Nilsson at San Francisco. Beginning that same year, he turned to stage direction. Among Windgassen's finest recordings are his Bayreuth PARSIFAL, captured with a superb cast under Knappertsbusch's direction, his 1954 Bayreuth LOHENGRIN under Jochum, his SIEGFRIEDs under both Böhm at Bayreuth and in the studio with Solti, and his Bayreuth TRISTAN with Böhm conducting and Nilsson as his Isolde.”

- Erik Eriksson, allmusic.com





“Hermann Uhde’s American mother was a student of the famous baritone Karl Scheidemantel. He was trained as a bass, by Philipp Kraus at the Opera School in Bremen, where he made his début as Titurel (1936). After engagements in Freiburg and Munich he appeared for the first time in baritone rôles at the Deutsches Theater im Haag in 1942. A prisoner-of-war from April 1945 to February 1946, he did not return to the stage until 1947. He subsequently appeared at the opera houses of Hamburg, Vienna and Munich where he became a member of the ensemble. He gained great success in rôles such as Mandryka, Gunther and Telramund, in which he was particularly admired. The artist was regularly invited to the Bayreuth Festival from 1951 to 1960 where he became one of its most important members, appearing as Holländer, Klingsor, Gunther, Donner, Wotan in RHEINGOLD, Telramund and Melot. He was also a guest at the Salzburg Festival and performed a superb Wozzeck at the Met (sung in English!) where he regularly appeared from 1955 to 1961 and again in 1964. He sang at the Grand Opéra Paris as well as at other European opera houses. He created several rôles, including Creon in Orff’s ANTIGONAE, the baritone rôles in Britten’s THE RAPE OF LUCRETIA and Wagner-Régeny’s DAS BERGWERK ZU FALUN. He died of a heart attack during a performance of Niels Viggo Bentzon’s FAUST III, at Copenhagen in 1965.”

- Andrea Shum-Binder, subito-cantabile