Turandot  (Leinsdorf;  Nilsson, Tebaldi, Bjorling, Tozzi)   (2-RCA Living Stereo 62687)
Item# OP0126
Regular price: $59.95
Sale price: $29.97
Availability: Usually ships the same business day

Product Description

Turandot  (Leinsdorf;  Nilsson, Tebaldi, Bjorling, Tozzi)   (2-RCA Living Stereo 62687)
OP0126. TURANDOT, recorded 1959, w.Leinsdorf Cond. Rome Opera Ensemble; Birgit Nilsson, Renata Tebaldi, Jussi Björling, Giorgio Tozzi, etc. 2-RCA Living Stereo 62687. Slipcase Edition, w.Elaborate Libretto-Brochure. Very long out-of-print, Final Sealed Copy! - 090266268726

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“This vintage recording of Turandot is remarkable for at least two classic performances, those of Birgit Nilsson as the icy Princess, an incomparable exponent in her generation, and of Jussi Björling as Calaf, singing as headily as ever only months before he died in 1960. For those unique interpretations, and also for Renata Tebaldi's beautiful if generalized rendering of Liù's part, this CD transfer is very welcome.”

- Gramophone, Sept., 1987



“This reissue of a 1959 recording captures four glorious voices at their peak, triumphantly conquering one of the most brutally difficult operas in the literature. Puccini taxed his singers almost beyond human endurance with his prolonged stratospheric writing (he also loved the musical depiction of physical torture). Nilsson's Turandot is thrilling; every inch the Ice Princess, her voice cuts through and soars over orchestra and chorus with the intense, brilliant radiance of a snowfield reflecting the sun, especially in the uppermost range. Required to sing at full volume until near the end, her stamina is incredible, as is her ability to suddenly modulate her voice from vengeful defiance to human warmth. Tebaldi's voice is achingly beautiful, lustrous and creamy; she makes Liù's submissiveness and fortitude deeply moving. Björling combines the power and brightness of a heldentenor with melting lyricism; his top has a radiant, clarion ring. Tozzi's sonorous bass gives Timur both majesty and desperation.”

- Edith Eisler