La Boheme  (Guadagno;  Tebaldi, Corelli, Guarrera, Hines)  (2-SRO 821)
Item# OP0128
Regular price: $49.90
Sale price: $24.95
Availability: Usually ships the same business day

Product Description

La Boheme  (Guadagno;  Tebaldi, Corelli, Guarrera, Hines)  (2-SRO 821)
OP0128. LA BOHEME, Live Performance, 32 Dec., 1969, w.Guadagno Cond. Philadelphia Opera Ensemble; Renata Tebaldi, Franco Corelli, Frank Guarrera, Maria Candida, Jerome Hines, etc. [Not a broadcast, an excellent in-house 'pirate' recording]; ANDREA CHÉNIER - Excerpts, Live Performance, 26 June, 1960, Vienna, w.von Matacic Cond. Renata Tebaldi, Franco Corelli, Ettore Bastianini. 2-SRO 821. Final ever-so-slightly used copy! - 036674821221

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“I heard Tebaldi many times, as a standee at the old Metropolitan Opera House from the mid-1950s through the early 1960s, and I never stopped marveling at the sheer beauty of the voice, her ability to project a pianissimo throughout the auditorium so that even though the note was extraordinarily soft, it sounded as if she were standing right next to you. The plushness of tone was probably the most unique feature of her singing, and along with that an innate sense of the appropriate shape of the phrase she was singing. She was not a subtle actress, never inflecting every phrase with subtexts of meaning the way Callas could, but nor was she a disengaged singer just pouring out lovely sounds. Her acting, both physical and vocal, was sincere and convincing, and at times very powerful. Her Butterfly broke your heart every time, through the moving way she shaped the ebb and flow of the music. There was no way you could see her as a 15 year old geisha, but by the wedding scene of the first act you were a complete believer.

Above all, there was that voice. It was immediately recognizable, distinctive, unlike any other. If you tuned in to a radio broadcast without hearing an announcement, two notes would be enough to identify the richly colored, luxurious sonority of the Tebaldi sound, a sound that caressed the ear and at the same time enveloped you. For many of us it was the sound that defined what an Italian soprano should be.”

- Henry Fogel, FANFARE



"Vocal size and rugged style mark [Corelli] as an open-air tenor….The vibrancy of his timbre is unequaled among tenors, and often it holds a commendable warmth as well…."

- Paul Jackson, SIGN-OFF FOR THE OLD MET, p.374



“With his slender but firm voice and winning stage presence, Frank Guarrera was a fixture at the Met in a number of roles: Escamillo in CARMEN (his début role in 1948), Marcello in LA BOHÈME, Valentin in FAUST. He also essayed larger, Verdian roles with honor, if not quite the vocal opulence of contemporaries like Robert Merrill, or Leonard Warren, whom he replaced as Simon Boccanegra a few days after Mr. Warren’s death onstage in 1960.

In 1948, when the 24-year-old Mr. Guarrera was participating in the Metropolitan Opera’s ‘Auditions of the Air’ (a precursor of the current National Council Auditions), which he eventually won, Toscanini heard him on the radio singing Ford’s monologue from FALSTAFF and arranged for an audition. The result was Mr. Guarrera’s engagement at La Scala in Boito’s NERONE on the 30th anniversary of Boito’s death. It was the first of several performances under Toscanini; Mr. Guarrera sang Ford on the conductor’s legendary 1950 FALSTAFF broadcasts, still available on CD.

His final role at the Met was Gianni Schicchi, which he last sang in 1976. After his retirement from the stage, he taught at the University of Washington in Seattle for 10 years."

- Anne Midgette, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 27 Nov., 2007