La Fanciulla del West (Votto;  Franco Corelli, Gigliola Frazzoni, Tito Gobbi)  (2-Myto 061.H110)
Item# OP0143
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Product Description

La Fanciulla del West (Votto;  Franco Corelli, Gigliola Frazzoni, Tito Gobbi)  (2-Myto 061.H110)
OP0143. LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST, Live Performance, 4 April, 1956, w.Votto Cond. La Scala Ensemble; Franco Corelli, Gigliola Frazzoni, Tito Gobbi, Enzo Sordello, Nicola Zaccaria, etc. (Italy) 2-Myto 061.H110 Very long out-of-print, Final Sealed Copy! - 8014399501101

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“Gigliola Frazzoni made her début at the Teatro Comunale Bologna, as Mimi in LA BOHÈME. She quickly enjoyed considerable success at major opera houses throughout Italy - Turin, Venice, Parma, Palermo, Rome and Milan, etc. She was a regular guest at the Verona Arena from 1956 to 1972. On 26 January, 1957, she took part in the world premiere of Francis Poulenc's DIALOGUES DES CARMÉLITES, as Mère Marie, at La Scala in Milan. Beginning in 1954, she sang outside Italy, notably in Cairo, Munich, Stuttgart, Wiesbaden, Zurich, Vienna, Bordeaux, Dublin, etc.

Frazzoni was admired in dramatic roles, especially by Verdi and Puccini and some other verismo composers such as Mascagni, Leoncavallo, Giordano. She can be heard on a complete recording of TOSCA, opposite Ferruccio Tagliavini and Giangiacomo Guelfi, also as Minnie in LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST with Franco Corelli as Ramerrez and Tito Gobbi as Rance, La Scala, Milan 4 April, 1956.”

- Butinsky





"Franco Corelli had been singing for well over a decade when he made his Met debut in 1961 at the age of 40. The first attraction in any Corelli performance is the voice itself. Solid and evenly produced from bottom to top, with no audible seams between registers. The middle and lower parts of the voice are dark and richly colored. The top is stunningly brilliant, and never thins out or turns hard. It is a once-in-a-generation kind of voice if your generation is lucky, and in the four decades since his retirement in 1976 we have had nothing like it for visceral power. Some critics complained because Corelli would hold high notes well beyond their value in the score. But if we listen to singers from the past whose careers overlapped with the great Italian opera composers, and who often worked with them, we can easily conclude that the composers expected it. (A recording of an aria from Francesco Cilea's ADRIANA LECOUVREUR by tenor Fernando de Lucia, with the composer accompanying at the piano, exposes liberties that go far beyond anything Corelli ever did, and Cilea echoes those 'distortions' at the keyboard."

- Henry Fogel, FANFARE





“Tito Gobbi was an admired operatic baritone. He originally studied at Padua University for a career in law, but he eventually gave that up in favor of pursuing voice lessons in Rome with Giulio Crimi. He made his operatic début in the town of Gubbio in 1935, as Count Rodolfo in Bellini's LA SONNAMBULA. He was hired at Milan's La Scala for the 1935-1936 season as an understudy; his first appearance there was as the Herald in Ildebrando Pizzetti's ORESEOLO.

He won the international singing competition in Vienna in 1936. As a result he began getting improved billing; he sang the rôle of Germont in LA TRAVIATA at the Teatro Reale in Rome in 1937. In the same year he sang Lelio in Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari's LE DONNE CURIOSE, and continued singing secondary rôles through 1939 there. He was promoted to primary rôles and in 1941 sang Ford in Verdi's FALSTAFF during a visit by the company to Berlin in 1941. Meanwhile, in a guest appearance at Rieti he first sang the rôle of Scarpia in Puccini's TOSCA in 1940. This was to become his best-known part.

Gobbi made his La Scala début in a major rôle in 1942 as Belcore in L'ELISIR D'AMORE. However, the performance that made him famous was as Wozzeck in the first Italian performance of Alban Berg's opera in Rome in November, 1942. Fighting raged throughout Italy following the Allied invasions there in 1943, interrupting his career. After the war he began to include international appearances. He first appeared in Stockholm in 1947 as Rigoletto; in 1948 he went to Covent Garden in concerts and to San Francisco to début as Figaro in Rossini's BARBER OF SEVILLE. His London operatic début was at Covent Garden as Belcore when the La Scala Company toured there. He appeared in Chicago in 1954 as Rossini's Figaro, and débuted at the Metropolitan Opera Company as Scarpia, 13 January, 1956. He sang Don Giovanni in Salzburg in 1952 under von Karajan's direction.

He took up producing as well, often at Chicago, where he made regular appearances, and producing opera became an ever more important part of his career after 1965, which is when he produced a performance starring himself in the title rôle of Verdi's SIMON BOCCANEGRA in London.

Although he was particularly well known for his portrayal of Verdi's baritone rôles (including Posa in DON CARLOS), and of Puccini's (Scarpia, Jack Rance, Gianni Schicchi), he had a very large repertory of well over 100 rôles, including such rare operas as Malipiero's ECUBA (as Ulysses), Teprulov in Rocca's MONTE IVNOR, the Count of Albaforita in Persico's LA LOCANDIERA, and operas by Lualdi, Napoli, and Ghedini. He was an excellent actor, had a high degree of musicianship and intelligence, had a flexible, rich, but not large baritone voice, and was at home in a wide variety of parts. He also appeared in 26 movies. He was the brother-in-law of another eminent singer, Boris Christoff. Gobbi retired from the operatic stage in 1979. He published an autobiography (TITO GOBBI: MY LIFE, 1979) and TITO GOBBI AND HIS WORLD OF ITALIAN OPERA (1984). He left a significant legacy of recorded performances, mainly made in the 1950s and 1960s.”

- Joseph Stevenson, allmusic.com