Jeanne d'Arc  (Khaikin;  Preobrazhenskaya, Kilchevsky)   (2-Aquarius AQVR 180)
Item# OP0240
$29.90
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Product Description

Jeanne d'Arc  (Khaikin;  Preobrazhenskaya, Kilchevsky)   (2-Aquarius AQVR 180)
OP0240. JEANNE D’ARC (Tchaikowsky), recorded 1946, w.Khaikin Cond. Leningrad Theatre Ensemble; Sofia Preobrazhenskaya, Vitali Ignatievich Kilchevsky, Nicolai Konstantinov, Odilia Kashevarova, etc. (Russia) 2-Aquarius AQVR 180. - 4607123630266

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“Sofia Preobrazhenskaya (Joan of Arc), Vitaly Kilchevsky (King Charles), Nicolai Konstantinov (The Cardinal), Odilia Kashevarova (Agnes Sorel), Vitali Runovsky (Dunois), Lipa Solomiak (Lionel), Vladimir Ulianov (Raymond), Ivan Yashugin (Thibaut of Arc); Orchestra and Chorus of the Kirov State Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet, Boris Khaikin. This performance was recorded with these Kirov musicians in Leningrad in 1946.”



“Vitaly Kilchevsky (1899-1986) was one of the famous Russian tenors of the Soviet period. For many years he sang as a soloist at theatres in Leningrad - Mikhailovsky (from 1936) and the Mariinsky (from 1944). In Moscow he performed at the Bolshoi between 1947 and 1955. He studied singing under the outstanding singer and teacher Sophia Akimova (wife of the great tenor Ivan Yershov) at the Leningrad Conservatory. One fellow student being the baritone Pavel Lisitsian.

Kilchevsky’s repertoire included many lyric tenor roles, such as Vaudemont and Lensky (IOLANTHE and EUGEN ONÉGIN), Alfredo, the Duke of Mantua, Faust (Gounod), Almaviva, Roméo, Gerald, etc. According to Ivan Petrov’s memoirs, Kilchevsky was an artistic singer, possessed of a lyric tenor voice which was particularly strong in the upper register. His most famous recordings are Tchaikovsky ‘s THE MAID OF ORLEANS (JEANNE D'ARC) (1946, the role of Charles VII) and Dargomizhsky’s RUSALKA (1948, the role of the Prince). His recorded heritage is also represented by operatic arias, duets, songs and romances, as well as recordings of recitals.”

- Z. D. Akron