Jongleur de Notre-Dame;  La Navarraise   (Dervaux;  Vanzo, Massard, Moizan)   (2-Gala 100.747)
Item# OP0241
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Product Description

Jongleur de Notre-Dame;  La Navarraise   (Dervaux;  Vanzo, Massard, Moizan)   (2-Gala 100.747)
OP0241. LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE-DAME (Massenet), Broadcast, 15 Dec., 1973, w.Dervaux Cond. ORTF Ensemble; Alain Vanzo, Robert Massard, Jules Bastin, Jean Dupouy, etc.; LA NAVARRAISE (Massenet), Broadcast Performance, 29 Nov., 1963, w.Hartemann Cond. ORTF Ensemble; Genevi�ve Moizan, Alain Vanzo, Jacques Mars, Lucien Lovano, etc.; LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE-DAME � Excerpts, w.Cloez Cond. Charles Friant, Roger Bourdin & Pierre Dupr�; La Navarraise � Excerpt, w.C�sar Vezzani. (Portugal) 2-Gala 100.747. Long out-of-print, (final professionally-made) copy! - 8712177046133

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE-DAME is a three-act opera (labelled in the programme as Miracle in Three Acts) by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Maurice Léna. It was first performed at the Opéra Garnier in Monte Carlo on 18 February 1902. It is based on the story of the same name by Anatole France in his collection L'Étui de nacre, which was in turn based on a 13th-century medieval legend by Gautier de Coincy, c. 1220. The role of Jean the juggler was popularised in the United States by the famous soprano, Mary Garden, which, according to some sources, horrified composer Massenet, who meant the role for a tenor. Garden's undertaking of the role was in the tradition of actresses of that era playing Peter Pan.

The opera was popular in the early part of the twentieth century, due partly to Mary Garden's appearances in it, but it soon disappeared from the world's stages, as did many of Massenet's other operas. Up to the early 1950s however, it received 356 performances at the Opéra-Comique in Paris."

- Revolvy





"...Vanzo combines all the elements of bel canto, whatever the selection. A seamless legato is joined with a technique that produces a beautiful, effortless sound....Vanzo's voice caresses the music and demonstrates elegance."

- Bob Rose, FANFARE, Nov./Dec., 2005





"Alain Vanzo made his debut at l'Opra and the Opra-Comique in 1957, going on to sing the Duke of Mantua in 1957. He became known and respected as a lyrical tenor and graduated towards a more robust tenor, culminating in his taking on Werther at age 40 and Don Jos at age 45! By the time he reached the age of 48, on 20 April, 1965, he sang with Montserrat Caball (her American debut) in a concert performance in Donizetti's LUCREZIA BORGIA at Carnegie Hall. Finally, after his 1976 performances of FAUST in the US, he had become a star.

In 1985, at age 57, [Vanzo] starred in the Paris Opra's historic revival of Meyerbeer's ROBERT LE DIABLE which the company had not staged for some 90 years. Mady Mespl, the soprano and a frequent vocal partner, told Le Monde that 'with [Vanzo's passing in 2002] a whole page of French lyric history has vanished."

- Anne Midgette, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 24 Feb. 2002





"Massard made his professional debut at the Paris Opra in 1952, as the High Priest in SAMSON ET DALILA, shorthly followed by Valentin in FAUST. The same year, he also made his debut at the Aix-en-Provence Festival, as Thoas in IPHIGENIE EN TAURIDE. His career rapidly took an international dimension with debuts in 1955, at La Scala and the Glyndebourne Festival, both as Ramiro in L'HEURE ESPAGNOLE. Oreste in IPHIGENIE EN TAURIDE was his debut role at the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, the Royal Opera House in London, and the Edinburgh Festival. Massard also appeared in North and South America, notably at the Lyric Opera of Chicago, at Carnegie Hall and the Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires. Henceforth considered one of the best French baritones of his generation, he was internationally acclaimed as Valentin in FAUST, Escamillo in CARMEN, Fieramosca in BENVENUTO CELLINI, and Golaud in PELLEAS ET MELISANDE."

- Ned Ludd



Genevive Moizan entered the Conservatoire de Paris in 1942, and upon graduation in 1946 she won first prize in the Saint Sulpice competition. She dbuted at the Paris Opra in 1949 as Margurite in FAUST (with Nor and Andr Pernet), moving on to a vast repertoire. She often appeared in Monte Carlo, Geneva, Strasbourg, Brussels, Algiers, etc. It was, however, her collaboration with the ORTF which gained her the essential part of her national popularity for almost twenty-five years.

With its clear timbre, her lyric soprano was equally acclaimed in both dramatic and mezzo-soprano rles: Werther, Sapho, Le Roi d'Ys, Mignon, Il Trovatore, etc.

- Zillah D. Akron