Don Giovanni  (Pinza; Milanov, Sayao, Melton, Novotna, Harrell)    (2-Guild 2236/37)
Item# OP0741
Regular price: $29.95
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Product Description

Don Giovanni  (Pinza; Milanov, Sayao, Melton, Novotna, Harrell)    (2-Guild 2236/37)
OP0741. DON GIOVANNI, Live Performance, 3 April, 1943, Chicago, w.Breisach Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Ezio Pinza, Salvatore Baccaloni, James Melton, Zinka Milanov, Jarmila Novotná, Bidù Sayão, Mack Harrell & Norman Cordon. (England) 2-Guild 2236/37. [Very long unavailable, it is wonderful to have a few copies, once again.] - 795754223729

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"To cap the 1943 performance [above], we have Milanov's only broadcast of a Mozart role. Its uniqueness lies not only in its rarity....her discovery of her dead father is a heartrending, gripping episode. Will she ever again be so passionately involved, so varied in vocal and dramatic effects, now flashing out, now retreating into sorrowful diminuendi, the vocal color astonishingly rich? She even faints convincingly. The thrill of her vocalism is undeniable. She spins great webs of silvery tone as she enters in the finale; her control is sure, the tone ravishing in the mask trio with the top voice well focused, her scales perfectly realized. The voice is well knit throughout its entire range and at all dynamic levels. She takes the first phrase of 'Non mi dir' in one breath; the turns are excellent and executed in a silky legato. When Anna first enters, Milanov, in her excitability, occasionally overshoots the mark vocally, but her discovery of her dead father is a heartrending, gripping episode. Will she ever again be so passionately involved, so varied in vocal and dramatic effects, now flashing out, now retreating into sorrowful diminuendi, the vocal color astonishingly rich?....the thrill of her vocalism is undeniable. She spins great webs of silvery tone as she enters in the finale; her control is secure, the tone ravishing in the mask trio with the top voice well focused, her scales perfectly realized. The voice is well knit throughout its entire range and at all dynamic levels....the turns are excellent and executed in a silky legato."

- Paul Jackson, SATURDAY AFTERNOONS AT THE OLD MET, pp.306-07





“Milanov is now singing with a beauty unmatched among the sopranos of this country.…with Miss Milanov’s truly wondrous vocal beauty to embellish the whole, [the performance of DON GIOVANNI] became…a humane communication of unusual power.”

- Virgil Thomson, 1943





“Milanov came like a bolt out of heaven - the voice and the young woman, both so vibrant and exciting. We knew something great had come into [the Met’s] Italian wing. What was not obvious at the beginning was that she would have such a staying power, for she gave so much in her singing.…I was present years later on her great anniversaries and she sang at mine [the fiftieth anniversary of [my] Met début, 1963]. She was incomparable. She was like a vocal sorceress singing the OTELLO arias that night. Such a roar went up from the public, I can never forget it.”

- Giovanni Martinelli





“In the dramatic Italian roles, the greatest soprano I ever sang with was Zinka Milanov.…Milanov had one of the greatest voices of this century…she had such power, such dramatic drive in her voice—and she had such pure top tones, including a pianissimo even on the high C, if she wanted.”

- Alexander Kipnis



“Pinza and Baccaloni are indeed wonderful in their recitatives, the words of their native language flashing vividly from their tongues...[Sayáo has] great charm and a real personality, so that Zerlina assumes a more central role in the opera than is often the case...Pinza’s suave charmer of a Don is certainly worth having.”

- MusicWeb International, Nov., 2003





“Sayão's technical mastery appeared not to include a well-knit trill, but superb phrasing, splendid diction, acting ability and a svelte figure made her a compelling artist both on stage and on the recital platform....What further eulogies can be written about this charming, mid-century songbird? A Jean de Reszke pupil and the worthy successor to the delicious Lucrezia Bori at the Met, she enjoyed a long career in the lighter French repertoire and is remembered with deep affection by all who had the good fortune to hear her in her prime.”

- Vivian A. Liff, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, May / June, 2011