Tannhauser  (Cluytens;  Windgassen, Brouwenstijn, Greindl)  (3-Walhall 0162)
Item# OP1088
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Product Description

Tannhauser  (Cluytens;  Windgassen, Brouwenstijn, Greindl)  (3-Walhall 0162)
OP1088. TANNHÄUSER, Live Performance, 9 Aug., 1955, w.Cluytens Cond. Bayreuth Ensemble; Wolfgang Windgassen, Josef Greindl, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Josef Traxel, Gerhard Stolze, Gré Brouwenstijn, Herta Wilfert, etc. (E.U.) 3-Walhall 0162. Long out-of-print, Final Sealed Copy! - 4035122651621

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“The most important singer of the German Heldentenor repertory in the 1950s and 1960s, Wolfgang Windgassen employed his not-quite-heroic instrument, believable physique, and considerable musical intelligence to forge memorable performances on-stage and in the recording studio. Although his voice lacked the sensuous appeal of Melchior's or Völker's, it was never unattractive and never employed to obvious effect. Indeed, it conveyed a youthfulness that suited the young Siegfried especially well."

- Erik Eriksson, allmusic.com





"The Dutch soprano Gré Brouwenstijn was one of those singers whom audiences and record collectors truly seemed to love....She seemed personally involved in everything she did."

- Ralph V. Lucano, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, Sept./Oct., 2011





"The Dutch soprano Gré Brouwenstijn has long been held in the highest esteem within her own country, and within a circle of vocal connoisseurs, for the fearless vibrancy of her approach to the great hochdramatisch soprano roles, without ever compromising the standards and ideals of vocal beauty: hers is a voice of great strength and flexibility, fully able to meet the challenge of projecting both the scale and drama of Wagner's heroines while also inhabiting their more intimate confessions. Brouwenstijn made precious few recordings - most of what is left to us now derives from private tapes or radio archives of live performances"

- Zillah Dorset Akron





“André Cluytens was among the leading French conductors of his time. His father, Alphonse, was conductor at the Royal French Theater of Antwerp. André became his assistant and a choirmaster there. When an illness prevented Alphonse from conducting, André made his performance début in 1927. After that experience he devoted his efforts to orchestral and opera conducting rather than choral work, and he became a resident conductor in the house.

In 1932 he accepted a position as the musical director of orchestral concerts at the Capitole de Toulouse, and he became a French citizen. In 1935 was appointed the opera director in Lyons. He was an assistant of Josef Krips in a summer series in Vichy and, once again, was called on to substitute when that conductor could not perform. He became musical director of the Lyons Opera in 1942, conductor of the Conservatoire Concerts and the French National Radio Orchestra in Paris in 1943, and in 1944 conducted at the Opéra de Paris. From 1947 to 1953 he was music director of the Paris Opéra-Comique, and in 1949 was appointed as principal conductor of the Conservatory Concerts. He retained that position for the rest of his life. In 1955 he was invited to conduct LOHENGRIN at the Bayreuth Festival, the first French person to appear on the podium there. He débuted in the United States in 1956, and in Britain in 1958, when he substituted for Otto Klemperer. He formed a close relationship with the Vienna State Opera, which he first conducted in 1956, becoming a permanent guest conductor in 1959. In 1960 he became conductor of the Belgian National Orchestra in Belgium, also holding that post until his death. He also formed a close link with the Berlin Philharmonic, with which he made a notable recording of the Beethoven symphonies. However, he was primarily known for French repertoire, premiering works by Françaix, Jolivet, Messiaen, Milhaud, Tomasi, Büsser, and Bondeville. He was invited back to Bayreuth in 1965.”

- Joseph Stevenson, allmusic.com