Otello   (Jochum;   Hopf,  Kupper,  Frantz)   (2-Walhall 0159)
Item# OP1124
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Product Description

Otello   (Jochum;   Hopf,  Kupper,  Frantz)   (2-Walhall 0159)
OP1124. OTELLO (in German), Broadcast Performance, 1955, w.Jochum Cond. Bayerischen Rundfunks Ensemble; Hans Hopf, Annelies Kupper, Ferdinand Frantz, etc. (E.U.) 2-Walhall 0159. - 4035122651591

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“Hans Hopf sang the title role in SIEGFRIED and Siegfried in GÖTTERDÄMMERUNG. He was singing both roles for the first time and naturally had put in yeoman’s work to have readied these mammoth roles for performances on the level demanded by the Bayreuth Festival. Formerly he had sung primarily the Italian repertoire, but was now beginning to concentrate on Wagner roles, which suited his robust voice very well. Hopf was an incomparable raconteur, and one was never bored in his company.”

- Birgit Nilsson, LA NILSSON, p.160





“For many of the record-buying public, their impression of German dramatic tenor Hans Hopf was formed upon viewing the wretched photograph that was displayed on the cover of his 1960 EMI recording of TANNHÄUSER. Appearing bloated and dim-witted, the tenor was sorely misrepresented by a portrait that should never have been released. While his voice had by that time grown beefier and less pliant, Hopf was too serious an artist to have been exposed to such a public relations disaster. For a truer picture, physically and aurally, turn to his Walter in EMI's live recording of Bayreuth's 1951 DIE MEISTERSINGER with Schwarzkopf, Edelmann, and Karajan. Here, before the strain of too many heroic roles took their toll, his singing was strong and highly agreeable, accomplished if somewhat short of poetic. Hopf studied with bass Paul Bender in Munich before making his début in 1936 singing Pinkerton with the Bavarian Regional Opera. Affiliations with Augsburg, Dresden, Oslo, and Berlin preceded his extended membership at the Bavarian Staatsoper beginning in 1949. In addition to his Bayreuth début, the 1950 -- 1951 season held a first appearance at Covent Garden, where Hopf sang his German-language Radames in an otherwise English-language AÏDA. He was also heard as Walter, pleasing the critics and audiences more for his sturdy singing than for his subtlety. Hopf remained with the Royal Opera through the 1952 -- 1953 season, offering his Walter all three years. At Bayreuth, Hopf worked his way to Parsifal, Tannhäuser, and Siegfried by the 1960s. In 1952, he made his Metropolitan Opera début as Walter. He continued to appear for five more years, eventually amassing a total of 34 performances in the Wagnerian repertory. At Salzburg in 1954, Hopf made his début as Max in Weber's DER FREISCHÜTZ. Although most of his career was spent in Europe, Hopf made two further appearances in American opera houses singing Herodes in both Chicago (1968) and San Francisco (1974), both times with Astrid Varnay as his consort. Although the latter production caught him rather late in the day, he was still an arresting Herod, dissolute and clearly not quite stable. In Germany, Hopf had achieved a considerable reputation as Verdi's Otello.”

- Erik Eriksson, allmusic.com





“Annelies Kupper (1906-87) was a grande dame of the German stages specializing in Mozart, but with enough power to take on Aïda, some Strauss heroines (Ariadne, Daphne), Tannhäuser’s Elizabeth and the heavy-duty heroines of Die Toten Augen, Die Tote Stadt and Tiefland, all heard on this disc….She does get splendid 'backup' from Wolfgang Windgassen in TANNHÄUSER, a ferocious Amonasro from Hans Reinmar in the ‘Nile Scene’, Kurt Boehme in TIEFLAND, and Lorenz Fehenberger in the glorious ‘Glück, das mir Verblieb’ from DIE TOTE STADT.”

- Charles H. Parsons, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, May/June, 2012





“After she had already worked as concert soprano, Annelies Kupper made her début in 1935 at the Opera House of Breslau as a second boy in ZAUBERFLÖTE. Other appearances quickly followed. After the National Theatre of Schwerin (1937-1938) and the National Theatre of Weimar (1938-1940), she came in 1940 to the State Opera of Hamburg. There she remained until 1945, and since then was a celebrated member of the Bavarian State Opera Munich. Annelies Kupper made regularly guest appearances at the State Opera of Vienna (starting in 1938 with the rôle of Eva in MEISTERSINGER) and at the State Opera, Berlin. Appearances led her to Paris, Stockholm, Brussels, The Hague and Amsterdam. At Bayreuth she sang in 1944 Eva in MEISTERSINGER, and in 1960 Elsa in LOHENGRIN. At the Salzburg Festival in August 1952 she created the title rôle in the official première of the Strauss’ DIE LIEBE DER DANAË, as the composer himself had promised her just before his death in 1949. In 1950 she sang the Female Chorus in THE RAPE OF LUCRETIA by Benjamin Britten, and also the solo soprano in MESSIAH and in Franz Schmidt’s BUCH MIT SIEBEN SIEGELN. In 1952-1953 she made a guest appearance at Covent Garden as Chrysothemis in ELEKTRA and in the première there of BUCH MIT SIEBEN SIEGELN. As late as 1961, she sang in Munich Desdemona in Verdi’s OTELLO. Until 1966 she still gave occasional appearances. After 1956 Annelies Kupper worked as lecturer, later as Professor at the Munich College of Music. The beauty of her voice, and the way she expressed her feelings were admired by the critics and the public alike.”

- Aryeh Oron



“German conductor Eugen Jochum is considered by many to have been the foremost Bruckner conductor of the mid- to late twentieth century; he producing many outstanding recordings of Bruckner's symphonies (as well as worthy interpretations of a great many other composers). He also left to posterity a number of written articles on the interpretation of that composer.

Musical studies began in early childhood (both of Eugen's brothers, Otto Jochum and Georg Ludwig Jochum, went on to become successful musicians in their own right), and Jochum attended the Augsburg Conservatory until he was 20 years of age. He enrolled in the Munich Academy of Music as a composition student of Hermann von Waltershausen, but soon diverted his energies to conducting (working with Siegmund von Hausegger). He worked as a rehearsal assistant at the Munich National Theater, and, after a successful Munich debut in 1926, was invited to join the conducting staff at the Kiel opera. In 1926, having developed a sizable operatic repertory, he moved to Mannheim (1929-1930) and then to Duisburg (1930-1932). Although relatively young, he was asked to serve as music director for Berlin Radio in 1932, and while in that city built an association with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra which would led to many guest conductor appearances in the following decades.

Jochum became music director of the Hamburg opera (and, along with that title, principal conductor of the Hamburg Philharmonic) in 1934, remaining at that post until 1949 -- effectively avoiding Nazi interference with his musical activities. During the 1930s, Jochum continued to champion a number of contemporary composers who had been officially banned by the Nazi party (such as Hindemith and Bartók), though his great love remained the late Romantic repertory.

After forming the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra in 1949, Jochum spent the 1950s developing that organization (in conjunction with his new role as music director for Bavarian radio) and building his stature as a guest conductor around Europe; his Bayreuth debut was in 1953, and he took partial charge of the Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam from 1961-1964. He conducted the Bamburg Symphony orchestra from 1969 to 1973, and was appointed conductor laureate of the London Symphony Orchestra for the 1978-1979 season. From 1950 on Jochum served as the president of the German chapter of the International Bruckner Society.

Jochum's conducting was marked by a fluent, lyric approach (which nevertheless proved capable of drawing tempestuous results from his players when necessary). Above all else he valued a rich, warm sound perfectly suited to the music of Bruckner and Wagner, though recordings show a wealth of insight into the music of other German masters, notably Beethoven, Bach, and Haydn.”

- Blair Johnston, allmusic.com