Barbiere   (Fournet;  Doria, Jansen, Depraz, Musy)    (2-Malibran 631)
Item# OP1213
$39.90
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Product Description

Barbiere   (Fournet;  Doria, Jansen, Depraz, Musy)    (2-Malibran 631)
OP1213. IL BARBIERE DI SIVIGLIA (in French), Live Performance, 18 June, 1955, w.Fournet Cond. l’Opéra Ensemble; Renée Doria, Jacques Jansen, Carlo Baroni, Xavier Depraz, Louis Musy, etc. (France) 2-Malibran 631. - 3760003776315

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“Renée Doria’s official operatic début took place in 1942, in Marseille, as Rosina in IL BARBIERE DI SIVIGLIA. After singing Constance in THE ABDUCTION FROM THE SERAGLIO in Cannes under Reynaldo Hahn, and the three heroines (Olympia, Giulietta, Antonia) in LES CONTES D'HOFFMANN in Strasbourg, opposite baritone Vanni Marcoux, she made her Paris début at the Gaîté-Lyrique in 1943, as Lakmé, and the following year, made her début at the Opéra-Comique, in the same rôle. Her début at the Paris Opéra in 1947, as the Queen of the Night in THE MAGIC FLUTE, was highly successful. Other rôles at that house included Leila in LES PÊCHEURS DE PERLES, the title rôle in MIREILLE, Marguérite in FAUST, Juliette in ROMÉO ET JULIETTE, Ophélie in HAMLET, Manon, Thaïs, as well as Fiordiligi in COSÌ FAN TUTTE, Gilda in RIGOLETTO, and Violetta in LA TRAVIATA, etc.

Doria also sang in baroque music such as Rameau's LES INDES GALANTES, and contemporary works, such as Ravel's L'HEURE ESPAGNOLE, and Poulenc's DIALOGUES DES CARMÉLITES. In her thirty year career, Doria sang an estimated sixty rôles.”



“Jacques Jansen was a French baryton-martin singer, particularly associated with the role of Pelléas but also active in operetta and on the concert platform, and later as a teacher. Jansen had a wide musical and artistic education; after studying the violin in Paris, he took lessons in solfège and bassoon at the conservatoire in Tours, where he also pursued courses in fine arts. Having taken vocal lessons with Charles Panzéra, from 1938 he studied under Claire Croiza and Georges Viseur (solfège) at the Paris Conservatoire. He also took classes with René Simon and Louis Jouvet and won prizes which might have allowed to followed a career in acting. In 1939 he sang the fountain scene and the tower scene of Claude Debussy's opera PELLÉAS ET MÉLISANDE with the Orchestre National de France under Inghelbrecht, an experience which left him overwhelmed with joy.

He made his début as Pelléas at the Grand Théâtre de Genève in 1941. After his Paris début at the Opéra-Comique as Pelléas on 20 April 1941, Jansen also appeared as a singer in Fauré's ‘Masques et bergamasques’ (January 1942), Valérien in ‘Malvina’ (July 1945) and the title rôle in FRAGONARD (February 1946). Jansen recorded Pelléas with an Opéra-Comique cast under the conductor Roger Désormière in April and May 1941 with Irène Joachim as Mélisande. This recording is widely considered as a reference recording of this opera. Jansen later recorded the same rôle under André Cluytens and Inghelbrecht. He also sang the rôle under Désormière with the Opéra-Comique company at Covent Garden in June 1949, as well as in New York, Brussels, Lisbon, Berlin, Milan, Rome and Tokyo. His last performance was in Tours in March 1971.

Although best remembered for the rôle of Pelléas, Jansen also sang baroque opera: LES INDES GALANTES by Jean-Philippe Rameau; modern opera: CHRISTOPHE COLOMBE by Darius Milhaud and LES CAPRICES DE MARIANNE at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in 1956; operetta: THE MERRY WIDOW by Franz Lehár, the première of LA BELLE DE PARIS by Georges Van Parys in 1961, and Antonin in CIBOULETTE in Geneva; and Lieder. Jansen was a magnetic interpreter of Danilo in THE MERRY WIDOW, which he performed some 1,500 times in France, displaying his acting skills, which he also used in several films. He dubbed the singing voice of Alain Cuny in LES VISITEURS DU SOIR (1942). He was for five years professor at the Conservatoire in Marseille, then held a similar post at the Paris Conservatoire, finally teaching vocal technique at the Opéra-Studio.

Louis Musy was a French operatic baritone and stage director principally active at the Paris Opéra-Comique. His teacher was Léon David. He made his début in LE CHEMINEAU by Leroux in 1925 at the Opéra-Comique and went on to sing many other French and Italian roles in the Opéra-Comique repertoire. Musy was a member of the four-member committee which ran the Opéra-Comique after the liberation of Paris during 1944. From 1947 he was a director of staging at the theatre. His pupils included Xavier Depraz, Jean Dupouy, Jacques Loreau, Irène Sicot and Remy Corazza. He sang in recordings of CARMEN in 1927 (as Escamillo), FAUST in 1930 (Valentin), THE TALES OF HOFFMAN in 1948 (Lindorf), and LOUISE in 1956 (Father); as well as L'ÉCOLE DES MARIS by Emmanuel Bondeville in 1954 (Sganarelle), and LES MOUSQUETAIRES AU COUVENT 1957 (Bridaine) AND LA FILLE DE MADAME ANGOT in 1958 (Larivaudière). He played Dr. Bartolo in the 1948 Opéra-Comique film of LE BARBIER DE SÉVILLE directed by Jean Loubignac and conducted by André Cluytens.”



“...the French bass Xavier Depraz had a warm basso cantante voice which darkened a little in its bottom register, opening out into a lower extension quite unusual for its type, enabling him to sing Mozart's bass roles convincingly....He is a touching Don Quichotte, a role he could have been born to sing....Nilakantha's stanzas from LAKMÉ are beautiful....one of his best roles [is] Basile in the Opéra-Comique version of BARBIERE...."

- Tully Potter, THE RECORD COLLECTOR, 2016



"Xavier Depraz entered the Paris Conservatory in 1947 studying under Fernand Francell for singing, Louis Musy for stage and René Simon for the theater. In 1951 he participated in operatic creations at the Opéra in Mulhouse and Nancy, two works composed by Marcel Landowski, and in concert version of Prokofiev’s THE FIREY ANGEL. He appeared in Béla Bartók’s BLUEBEARD'S CASTLE, plus RIGOLETTO, DON GIOVANNI, DON QUIXOTE and THAÏS. Late in his life he began a prolific dramatic artist career, first on television, for which he notably played the role of Ursus in THE MAN WHO LAUGHS for Jean Kerchbron then to the big screen. Very large, dry, emaciated face, deep timbre, he alternated effectively in military roles, as clergeymen as well as crooks. He was professor of opera at the Paris Conservatoire in 1973.”

- Zillah Akron Dorset