Contes d'Hoffmann  (Moralt;  London, Stich-Randall, Kmentt, Streich, Schlemm)  (2-Walhall 0196)
Item# OP1416
Regular price: $19.90
Sale price: $9.95
Availability: Usually ships the same business day

Product Description

Contes d'Hoffmann  (Moralt;  London, Stich-Randall, Kmentt, Streich, Schlemm)  (2-Walhall 0196)
OP1416. LES CONTES D�HOFFMANN (in German), Broadcast Performance, 1956, w.Moralt Cond. Bayerischen Rundfunks Ensemble; Waldemar Kmentt, George London, Rita Streich, Teresa Stich-Randall, Anny Schlemm, etc. (E.U.) 2-Walhall 0196. - 4035122651966

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“Teresa Stich-Randall, an American soprano whose reputation was won and maintained in European opera houses, made her first appearances at the Vienna State Opera and the Salzburg Festival. After 1955, she was a frequent principal at summer events in Aix-en-Provence, France.

Noted for her clarity of voice and diction, Ms. Stich-Randall gravitated toward Mozart, Handel and Bach, repertory she recorded with conductors like Lorin Maazel, Hermann Scherchen, Felix Prohaska and Mogens Woldike. In 1947 in New York, she made her operatic debut as Henrietta M. in the premiere of Virgil Thomson’s MOTHER OF US ALL and the next year took the title role in Otto Luening’s EVANGELINE. Arturo Toscanini engaged her for performances with his NBC Symphony Orchestra in New York. Her Metropolitan Opera debut, in 1961, was as Fiordiligi in Mozart’s COSÌ FAN TUTTE. She remained on the Met roster until 1966. But Europe became the center of her activity, beginning in Florence in Weber’s OBERON in 1951 followed by appearances at the Basel Opera in Switzerland.”

- Bernard Holland, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 24 July, 2007



�In the many performances I have appeared in, there were many wonderful colleagues who had me in raptures. There were those with magnificent voices, or great musicians, wonderful actors or great personalities. But George London had it ALL. He was as impressive on stage as he was the wonderful colleague and friend in his private life.�

- Birgit Nilsson, as quoted in Leonardo A. Ciampa�s THE TWILIGHT OF BELCANTO, p.130



�George London was a dramatic and very expressive singer. In many r�les he sang like a demonic panther with a sound of purple-black in color. London was a singer favoring the drama in a piece, varying color to suggest shifts of mood. His acting on stage was described as overwhelming. The special magnetism of this artist is documented on his great recordings. Every r�le he sang was sung with utmost expression and unbelievable commitment, truly a singing-actor!�

- Andrea Shum-Binder, subito-cantabile