Cavalleria Rusticana   (Rethberg  /  Milanov, Papi,  Rayner, Morelli)   (2-WHRA 6002)
Item# OP1479
$39.95
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Product Description

Cavalleria Rusticana   (Rethberg  /  Milanov, Papi,  Rayner, Morelli)   (2-WHRA 6002)
OP1479. CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA, Live Performance, 10 April, 1937, Boston, w.Papi Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Elisabeth Rethberg, Sidney Rayner, Carlo Morelli, Irra Petina, Anna Kaskas, etc.;   CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA, Live Performance, 3 March, 1951, w.Erede Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Zinka Milanov, Richard Tucker, Clifford Harvuot, Martha Lipton & Jean Madeira.  (E.U.) 2-West Hill Radio Archives WHRA 6002. - 4015023160026

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"Rethberg performed only three Santuzzas with the Metropolitan, the first in 1927 and the last a decade later, on 10 April, 1937, while on tour in Boston. Ponselle had been singing all the Santuzzas on the tour but was indisposed, so Rethberg was unexpectedly called into service."

- Paul Jackson, SATURDAY AFTERNOONS AT THE OLD MET, pp.135-36



"On this afternoon, a newly found self-confidence and command undergird [Milanov’s] performance. The voice has gained in density and richness – that drop of silver which once rimmed her tone has been subsumed into a more complex tonal fabric. Now her control is sure….Beyond tonal opulence, Milanov offers unexpected subtleties, both musical and dramatic, throughout the afternoon."

- Paul Jackson, SIGN-OFF FOR THE OLD MET, p.33



“Milanov's movement was all from emotion, never from thought. If you could get into her frame of mind, she could actually be quite moving. If not, you found it more of the silent film variety of acting, in which pantomime had to make up for the lack of sound. But of course Milanov had the advantage of the sound to go with the pantomime, and her acting and her singing were of a piece. She always knew what the character’s situation was emotionally, and she could convey it so rightly in the sound, the inflection—she had the greatest dynamic range, from soft to loud, of any singer perhaps there has ever been. She was nonetheless difficult to work with because if you told her something that went against how she felt a certain moment, there was resistance, often, I might say, terminal resistance.…About the time you were so exasperated that you couldn’t go on, she would sing something so magnificently that it didn’t matter at all what she did at the same time. I am the director, and I state that heresy. So very often people who moved more fluidly, more realistically, did not have in the sound, in the voice, the real meaning. They were no less lacking than the singer who was not a first-rate actor.”

- Dino Yannopoulos



“I would make any concession for a voice such as hers, absolutely any.”

- José Quintero



“Milanov came like a bolt out of heaven - the voice and the young woman, both so vibrant and exciting. We knew something great had come into [the Met’s] Italian wing. What was not obvious at the beginning was that she would have such a staying power, for she gave so much in her singing.…I was present years later on her great anniversaries and she sang at mine [the fiftieth anniversary of [my] Met début, 1963]. She was incomparable. She was like a vocal sorceress singing the OTELLO arias that night. Such a roar went up from the public, I can never forget it.”

- Giovanni Martinelli



"Ponselle had been singing all the Santuzzas on the [1937] tour but was indisposed, so Rethberg was unexpectedly called into service….Rethberg performed only three Santuzzas with the Metropolitan [and this was her final one]."

- Paul Jackson, SATURDAY AFTERNOONS AT THE OLD MET, pp.135-36



“Rayner’s art and in particular that intensity of brilliant tone above the stave [are reasons why] his recordings are well worth a place in any collection….Rayner, surprisingly, competes with his American contemporaries Charles Kullman and Richard Crooks …..”

-Alan Bilgora, THE RECORD COLLECTOR, 2013