Simon Boccanegra  (Altmann;  Reinmar, Miltschinoff, Wunzer, Misske, von Lochner)  (2-Walhall 0240)
Item# OP1758
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Product Description

Simon Boccanegra  (Altmann;  Reinmar, Miltschinoff, Wunzer, Misske, von Lochner)  (2-Walhall 0240)
OP1758. SIMON BOCCANEGRA (in German), Broadcast Performance, 1947, w.Altmann Cond. Bayerischen Rundfunks Ensemble;  Hans Reinmar, Rudolf Wünzer, Gerhard Misske, Wulf von Lochner, Alexander Miltschinoff, Erna Dietrich, etc.; ALEXANDER MILTSCHINOFF:  Opera recital.  (E.U.) 2-Walhall 0240.  - 4035122652406

CRITIC REVIEW:

“Hans Reinmar was a formidably equipped Viennese baritone [who] began his career with some provincial appointments, slowly learning his craft at the Municipal Theatre in Olomouc (or Olmütz as Reinmar would doubtless still have known it) and the opera company in Nuremberg. He then moved to Zürich and back, prestigiously, to Berlin after small stints in Dresden and Hamburg. Although he was heard in Bayreuth and in Salzburg, Berlin remained his base for the rest of his career. When one thinks of the contemporary competition - Bockelmann, Rode, Janssen, Schlusnus, Domgraf-Fassbänder and Hüsch among them - one realises that Reinmar had to have carved out his roles with considerable distinction and had the voice and the stamina to survive such strong colleagues. He sang much of the expected repertoire but also Hindemith’s Mathis der Maler and von Einem’s Dantons Tod (both after the War) and Boris Godunov (he was reputed to have been excellent) and, much earlier in his career, Kurt Weill. One of his last important roles was in Robert Kurka’s splendid opera THE GOOD SOLDIER SCHWEIK and it was a melancholy coincidence that he died, in February 1961, two days after his final appearance in Kurka’s opera.

He was a lauded Mozartian and a noted Verdi baritone and we have ample evidence to support the admiration of his contemporaries. That said I would characterise him as more a character baritone than one with a beautiful voice per se. In fact declamatory power was what Reinmar had, and a great deal of it, a strong sense of involvement and characterisation. Not for nothing did Reinmar work at the Komische Oper in Berlin.”

- Jonathan Woolf