Les Bavards  (Offenbach)  (Capdevielle;  Simon, Revoil, Doniat, Vessieres)   (Malibran 700)
Item# OP1800
$19.90
Availability: Usually ships the same business day

Product Description

Les Bavards  (Offenbach)  (Capdevielle;  Simon, Revoil, Doniat, Vessieres)   (Malibran 700)
OP1800. LES BAVARDS (Offenbach), Broadcast Performances, 25 Feb., 1958, w.Capdevielle Cond. Annick Simon, Fanély Revoil, Aimé Doniat, André Vessières, etc.  (France) Malibran 700. - 3760003777008

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“Fanély Revoil was a French singer who had a major career in opera and operetta between 1950 and 1989. In 1933, she made her first appearances in Paris, at the Théâtre de la Porte Saint-Martin in small roles before creating Madame Dubarry in the French premiere of LA DUBARRY. Following this success, others followed including Paris premieres of creations in VALSES DE VIENNE (1933), LE TZARÉWITCH (1935), UN COUP DE VEINE (1935), AU SOLEIL DU MEXIQUE (1935) and LA BELLE TRAVERSÉE (1937).

After the Porte Saint Martin she made her début at the Opéra-Comique (creating the role of Lucine in LE TESTAMENT DE LA TANTE CAROLINE), and although never a member of the company she sang regularly with them for ten years, including Lazuli in L'ÉTOILE, la Guimard in FRAGONARD and the title role in CIBOULETTE. Revoil appeared many times at the Théâtre du Châtelet, in SOLEIL DU MEXIQUE, NINA ROSA, ROSE-MARIE, and created the title role in LA MARÉCHALE SANS-GÊNE there in 1948. At the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées she performed in the premiere of VIRGINIE DEJAZET in 1946.

She made many foreign tours (Portugal, Netherlands, Italy, Britain) often alongside Willy Clément. After retiring from the stage she taught operetta singing at the Paris Conservatoire. As well as the 1941 recording of excerpts from L'ÉTOILE under Roger Désormière and the complete 1948 recording of THE TALES OF HOFFMANN under André Cluytens, Revoil sang in many French radio recordings of operettas and opéra-comiques during the 1950s, and appeared in the film LES DEUX GAMINES in 1936.

When Aimé Doniat left the Conservatoire (with a first Bassoon Prize), he was engaged in an orchestra. After only three months, and having made the acquaintance of a small traveling troupe, he was hired to accompany it during its tour in Algeria, and then joined with it in Marseilles. From there, he joined the National Radio. The Radio Orchestra and its chorus returned to Paris in March 1943. Doniat became a soloist and was frequently called upon to replace singers in lyrical performances on various Parisian and provincial scenes. As early as 1944, he decided to take a big risk and became soloist for the various radio programs: operettas, comic operas. His new activity also led him to participate in several casts in various operettas performed in concert halls.

Doniat worked extensively for Véga, Decca, RCA, Erato, Saphir, Le Chant du Monde, Musidisc, EMI, Pathé, Vox, Visadisc, Philips and recorded over 160 LPs. After the disappearance of the LP, more than fifty reissues were released before the end of the twentieth century, in discs, cassettes and compact discs. He won 10 Grands Prix du Disque. He sang Delmet, Botrel, Scotto, and many others. He resurrected medieval songs and French provinces. He wrote lyrics on ancient mélodies he loved to discover. He translated into French the booklets of a few German-language operettas.

Beside his recordings, Aimé Doniat remained one of the essential pillars of the Lyric Service of the RTF, then of the ORTF. For many years, before the taste of the French public for classic lyric art faded, he recorded a dozen operettas a month (which left very little time for rehearsals) with Jany Sylvaire and Lina Dachary, his most faithful female partners, and under the direction in particular of Jules Gressier and Marcel Cariven. The number of these recordings was reduced to two per month during the last ten years of its life, as broadcasting programs had shrunk considerably on national radio. They were heard more on the Belgian and Swiss radio channels. Doniat taught singing for a long time on a private basis, for a few selected pupils, ultimately teaching at Versailles.”

- Wikipedia