Carmen  (Reiner;  Stevens, Tucker, Silveri, Conner)   (2-Walhall 0283)
Item# OP1945
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Product Description

Carmen  (Reiner;  Stevens, Tucker, Silveri, Conner)   (2-Walhall 0283)
OP1945. CARMEN, Live Performance, 16 Feb., 1952, w.Reiner Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Risë Stevens, Richard Tucker, Nadine Conner, Paolo Silveri, etc. (E.U.) 2-Walhall 0283. - 4035122652833

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“Fritz Reiner was a legend among conductors. Universally admired for his music-making, widely disliked for his aggressive and exacting temperament, and survived by a legacy of definitive recorded performances, he was largely responsible for the artistic ascendancy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and exerted considerable influence on generations of musicians.

Born in Budapest in 1888, he studied piano with his mother and, at the age of 15, entered the Franz Liszt Academy -- an institution that also boasts Bela Bartók, Zoltan Kodály, Ernst von Dohnányi, George Szell, Eugene Ormandy, Georg Solti and Antal Dorati as graduates. Reiner gained conducting experience at a number of regional opera houses before eventually returning to Budapest in 1911 to serve at the city's Volksoper, where his reputation as a conductor of special abilities finally emerged. In 1914 Reiner accepted a position at the Dresden Court Opera, where he formed a fortuitous relationship with both the conductor Arthur Nikisch and the composer Richard Strauss; Reiner would eventually give the German premier of Strauss' DIE FRAU OHNE SCHATTEN, and would remain a devoted interpreter of the composer's works throughout his career. The economic chaos and emergent anti-Semitism that followed the First World War made Reiner anxious to leave Europe, and an invitation (in 1921) to become the music director of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra provided just the right opportunity. From that point onward, Reiner's career was firmly rooted in the United States, where he became a citizen in 1928.

After resigning his post at Cincinnati Reiner became a professor of conducting at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, where his students included both the young Leonard Bernstein and Lukas Foss; Bernstein, in particular, credited Reiner with a great deal of influence in his development. In 1938 he became the director of the Pittsburgh Symphony -- one of several positions that established Reiner as a fine builder of orchestras, with a talent for steering ensembles toward new levels of quality and success. A number of Reiner's well-known recordings stem from his tenure there. Guest appearances during his Pittsburgh years include those at Covent Garden and the San Francisco Symphony. From Pittsburgh he moved to the Metropolitan opera, where he remained on the conductor roster until 1953; his advocacy of Strauss' operas was especially strong there, and his performances of SALOME and ELEKTRA number among the most memorable evenings in the Met's history.

1953 was a watershed year for Reiner, since it was then that he assumed the directorship of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. This was to become his signature partnership, and the position that would establish his lasting legacy. His relationship with the orchestra was never a smooth one -- he was known for hostility and impatience in rehearsal, and for firing musicians for mistakes in concerts -- but he undeniably raised the ensemble from its status as a good American orchestra to that of one of the finest in the world. Unlike a number of other prominent conductors who excelled in narrow corners of the musical canon, Reiner maintained his excellent standards and clarifying precision throughout an especially broad repertory that crossed boundaries of nationality and style. He was as renowned for his performances of new works, such as Bartók's Concerto for Orchestra -- a piece that Reiner himself commissioned from the dying composer -- and Alan Hovhaness' MYSTERIOUS MOUNTAIN as he was for his Mahler, Strauss and Haydn. His tenure in Chicago also resulted in what was then an unprecedented volume of fine recordings, some of which still remain as favorites, despite the [purported] improved fidelity of modern competitors. Reiner resigned from Chicago in 1962 (after only nine seasons), and died the following year of heart failure.”

- Allen Schrott, allmusic.com



“Stevens was the Premiere American Carmen and one of the greatest of all time. She was vocally solid, sultry, with plenty of insight into the dramatics. In lovely contrast is Conner’s immaculately sung Micaela. Tucker’s José is vocally luxurious and a wild man in the dramatic department. One could quibble about the dry, bulky-voiced Silveri, but he gets the job done well. Even the usually cut Act 3 duet for Jose and Escamillo is included. The other men in the cast are veterans (Hawkins, De Paolis, Cehanovsky), dramatically astute, vocally questionable. The youngsters — Harvuot, Amara, and Roggero — are excellent. The Met chorus and orchestra then were nothing like the precise machines of today; but under a strict, and I do mean strict, conductor like Reiner they are on their vocal and orchestra toes in a fast, exciting performance. He starts the Act 2 ‘Chanson Boheme’ at such a fast clip one wonders where can it go from there. It’s fast, as fast as possible—then faster! The chorus is spared a lot in their Act 4 exaltations. They are cut. As for the final Carmen- José duet, Reiner, Stevens, and Tucker are in harmony as they slowly build the tension — Stevens steadily contemptuous, brave to the very end; Tucker already a broken man sinking into insane rage.”

- Charles H. Parsons, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, March/April, 2012



“[Stevens’] forceful pronouncements have the authority which only years of living with a rôle can provide, and the voice is entirely secure throughout its range, its tones flashed with a lustrous bronze tincture. Reiner’s somber pace for the card aria compounds a mezzo soprano’s problem with the low-lying scene, but Stevens…stays the course and, in the end, makes an effective pronouncement.”

- Paul Jackson, SIGN-OFF FOR THE OLD MET, p.52



“By the time Risë Stevens was 18, she was appearing regularly, sometimes in leading roles, with the Little Theater Opera Company, a Brooklyn troupe. (The company was later known as the New York Opéra-Comique). In the audience one night was Anna Schön-René, a well-known voice teacher on the faculty of the Juilliard School. She began teaching Ms. Stevens privately, and arranged for her to attend Juilliard on a scholarship, starting in the fall of 1933. Ms. Stevens spent two and a half years at Juilliard, where she continued her studies with Schön-René. Though Ms. Stevens had been considered a contralto, Schön-René discerned her true vocal register and helped lighten her voice for mezzo roles. In 1935, financed by Schön-René, Ms. Stevens spent the summer at the Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria, where her teachers included the distinguished soprano Marie Gutheil-Schöder.

Ms. Stevens returned to Europe, making her formal operatic début in Prague, as Mignon, in 1936. Joining the Met in 1938, she made her first appearance with the company on 22 Nov., singing Octavian out of town in Philadelphia. On 17 Dec., she performed for the first time on the Metropolitan Opera stage in New York, singing Mignon.

In Ms. Stevens’ 351 regular appearances at the Met, her professionalism was perhaps never more apparent than it was in one of her many productions of SAMSON ET DALILA. Playing the temptress Dalila, Ms. Stevens reclined on a chaise longue to sing the aria ‘Mon coeur s’ouvre ŕ ta voix’, among the most famous seductions in opera. One night, overcome with theatrical passion, Samson flung himself onto her mid-aria. Samson did not know his own strength. Under his considerable force, the chaise longue, on casters, began to move. Ms. Stevens sailed offstage and into the wings, still singing."

- Margalit Fox, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 21 March, 2013



"...for some thirty years, until his sudden death in 1975, Tucker's vocal security, boundless energy, unceasing enthusiasm, and thorough professionalism ensured a level of popularity that necessitated comparisons to some of his greatest predecessors....Tucker sang thrillingly and delivered the goods, communicating his own joy in singing to all who would listen...."

- Marc Mandel, FANFARE, May/June, 1997



“Paolo Silveri was an Italian baritone, particularly associated with the Italian repertory, one of the finest Verdi baritones of his time. Silveri studied first in Capestrano (L'Aquila) then in Rome with Perugini and later with Riccardo Stracciari and the bass Giulio Cirino (father of Silveri's wife Delia), making his début there as a bass in 1939. After further studies, he made new début as a baritone in 1944, as Germont in Rome. Thereafter, he rapidly sang throughout Italy, notably at the San Carlo in Naples, and La Scala in Milan, début as de Luna in 1949. He also appeared at the Royal Opera House in London, in 1946, and at the Paris Opéra, début in 1951, as Renato.

He made his Metropolitan Opera début in 1950, as Don Giovanni with Fritz Reiner conductor; he also sang Rigoletto and Posa there.

He attempted the role of Otello in 1959, but quickly reverted to baritone roles. He was especially noted for his great interpretations of Verdi operas and some other roles as Scarpia , Figaro, Guglielmo Tell and Don Govanni. He can be heard on complete recordings of NABUCCO, LA TRAVIATA, SIMON BOCCANEGRA, DON CARLO, LA GIOCONDA and TOSCA.

Silveri retired from the stage in 1968 after a last performance of RIGOLETTO in Budapest with his daughter Silvia in the role of Gilda, and taught in Rome, where he died at age 87 in the summer of 2001.”

-Zillah Akron Dorset