Tannhauser (Solti;  Prey, Rysanek, Dalis, Rothmuller, Hopf, Jerome Hines, Norman Scott)   (3-Walhall 0325)
Item# OP2158
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Tannhauser (Solti;  Prey, Rysanek, Dalis, Rothmuller, Hopf, Jerome Hines, Norman Scott)   (3-Walhall 0325)
OP2158. TANNHAUSER, Live Performance, 17 Dec., 1960, w.Solti (Debut) Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Hermann Prey (Debut), Marko Rothmuller, Leonie Rysanek, Irene Dalis, Hans Hopf, Jerome Hines, Norman Scott, etc. (E.U.) 3-Walhall 0325. - 4035122653250

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"Though Mr. Prey's voice was a mellow, lyric baritone, he sang with such focused sound and robust projection that he enjoyed an active career in opera. He avoided the heavier Verdi roles, but excelled at Mozart, Gluck, Rossini, and lighter Strauss and Wagner roles. One of his great achievements was Beckmesser in Wagner's MEISTERSINGER, which he sang at the Met in 1993. To his characterization of a town clerk in medieval Nuremberg, typically portrayed as a scheming buffoon, Mr. Prey brought an emotional complexity and light-on-the-feet comic grace that made Beckmesser endearing.

Mr. Prey's voice was ideally suited to lieder, and he left a large and important discography, including songs by Schubert, Schumann, Strauss, Mahler, and Carl Loewe, a neglected 19th-century composer whom Mr. Prey championed. Commenting on Mr. Prey's 1985 recording of Schubert's WINTERREISE with the pianist Philippe Bianconi, The New York Times critic Bernard Holland wrote: 'This is Schubert singing that does not twist sound for pictorial or dramatic effect but instead creates, with unusual musical clarity and purity of tone, a narrative voice which, though concerned and moved, tells the story first and lives it only indirectly'."

- Anthony Tommasini, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 24 July, 1998





"The opening phrases of 'Dich, teure Halle' are flavored with [Rysanek's] trademark vigor - when she can soar, we travel with her....communication and character revelation are always Rysanek's formidable assets. As Venus, Dalis offers one of her best broadcast portraits, her vocalism strongly colored in the lower range and firmly anchored on high. Her handling of text and musical nuance is exemplary, seduction seems plausible, and a searing top tone puts the cap on the Venusburg episode."

- Paul Jackson, SIGN-OFF FOR THE OLD MET, p.290





"Irene Dalis, a versatile and fiery mezzo-soprano who starred at the Metropolitan Opera for two decades before building a second career as the director of Opera San Jose, an innovative company she founded in her California hometown, did not set out to be a singer or an impresario. She studied piano and music education at what was then San Jose State College before earning a master's degree at Columbia's Teachers College in Manhattan in the late 1940s. The plan was to go back home and teach. Yet her instructors in New York were struck by her voice and encouraged her to develop it. She began taking lessons with the mezzo-soprano Edyth Walker. Instead of returning to San Jose, she went to Italy to study voice on a Fulbright scholarship in 1951. Just two years later she made her operatic debut as Princess Eboli in Verdi's DON CARLO in Oldenburg, Germany. Four years after that, she performed the same role at the Met. Her debut at the Met, on 16 March, 1957, was 'one of the most exciting of the season', Howard Taubman wrote in THE NEW YORK TIMES. 'By the time she reached the second-act trio she showed she could sing with temperament', Mr. Taubman said. 'And in the third-act, 'O don fatale', one of Verdi's greatest dramatic arias, she was like a veteran. Her voice, which has range, security and brilliant top notes, was now under full control. She sang and moved with a total absorption in the emotion of the character. Her singing had color and fire. In terms of sheer quality there may be more sumptuous voices at the Met in the mezzo-soprano division; Miss Dalis uses hers like an artist'.

For the next two decades, Ms. Dalis was among the Met's most admired performers, appearing more than 270 times and singing virtually every major mezzo-soprano part written by Verdi, Wagner, Richard Strauss and others. She was nurtured by Rudolf Bing, the Met's formidable general manager, and performed with Birgit Nilsson, Jussi Bjorling, Robert Merrill, Leontyne Price, Placido Domingo and Leonie Rysanek.

She would perform for another decade, but in the mid-1970s she finally went home to California to teach voice, finding a position at San Jose State. Her work with students there led to her founding of Opera San Jose in 1984. It was modeled on a program in Oldenburg, which gave young performers like Ms. Dalis the chance to sing big roles early in their careers. 'In the old days, singers started singing major roles at a young age, and it didn't ruin their voices, did it?' she said in an interview with OPERA NEWS in 2007. The company, which performs at the California Theater, a restored 1927 movie palace, has its own costume and set shops, owns administrative buildings and provides apartments to some performers. Ms. Dalis ran it until this June. OPERA NEWS called Opera San Jose 'the only opera company in the U.S. entirely dedicated to developing the careers of emerging young artists'."

- William Yardley, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 18 Dec., 2014





"Marko Rothmuller, who made his Metropolitan Opera debut in Wagner's MEISTERSINGER in 1959, had a singing career that began with Weber's FREISCHUTZ in Hamburg in 1932. He rejoined the Met's company for the 1964-1965 season. By then, he had been appointed a professor of voice in Bloomington, where he started teaching in 1955. He was a native of Croatia, and studied at the Zagreb Music Academy. He went to Vienna to train as a singer with Franz Steiner and study composition with Alban Berg; the title role of Berg's WOZZECK became a signature piece. He studied for that role with Erich Kleiber, who conducted the Berlin premiere of WOZZECK in 1925.

After his engagement at the Hamburg Opera, Mr Rothmuller established himself as one of Europe's most promising baritones, scoring successes particularly in works by Wagner and Verdi. Because he was of Jewish descent, he left Germany in the early 1930's to sing in Zagreb and Zurich, where he appeared regularly until 1947. His European engagements then took him to the Vienna State Opera, Covent Garden and the Glyndebourne Opera at the Edinburgh International Festival of Music and Drama.

In 1954, he returned to Germany for the first time with a guest appearance in West Berlin. His American debut was with the New York City Center Opera as Amonasro in Verdi's AIDA in 1948, after which he traveled extensively in this country for occasional opera and concert engagements."

- Wolfgang Saxon, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 22 Jan., 1993





"The American bass Jerome Hines had a long and distinguished career at the Metropolitan Opera singing a wide variety of roles with true consistency of voice and style. He appeared with the company for more than 40 years from 1946. An imposing figure - he was 6ft 6in tall - he had a voluminous bass to match his stature.

His charismatic presence made him ideal for the many roles demanding a big personality. It was thus hardly surprising that Sarastro in THE MAGIC FLUTE, Gounod's Mephistopheles, the high priest Ramfis in AIDA, the Grand Inquisitor in DON CARLOS, Boris Godunov, and King Mark in TRISTAN UND ISOLDE were among his leading roles.

Although always faithful to the Met, Hines made many forays abroad. In 1953, he undertook Nick Shadow, with Glyndebourne, at the Edinburgh festival, in the first British performances of Stravinsky's THE RAKE'S PROGRESS. That led to engagements in leading houses in Europe and south America, and eventually to Bayreuth, where he sang Gurnemanz, King Mark and Wotan (1958-63). In 1958, he made his La Scala debut in the title part of Handel's HERCULES, and, in 1961, he first appeared at the San Carlo in Naples, in the title role of Boito's MEFISTOFELE. His Boris Godunov, at the Bolshoi in Moscow in 1962, was, by all accounts, a deeply impressive portrayal.

He was fortunate to arrive at the Met just as the opera house was in need of replacements for the great Ezio Pinza, who had decided to appear in SOUTH PACIFIC. Unlike his distinguished predecessor, Hines could also sing the German and Russian repertory, in addition to Italian and French. In all, his innate musicianship stood him in good stead. Most of his discs derived from live performances. They reveal a sterling voice, a refined style, consisting of a burnished tone, a fine line and exemplary diction, although he never seems to have have been a very profound interpreter.

Hines was both a deeply religious person and a good writer. He combined these qualities in his own opera, I AM THE WAY, a work about Jesus, performed, with Hines as the protagonist, at Philadelphia in 1969. The previous year, he had published his autobiography, THIS IS MY STORY, THIS IS MY SONG, but his most lasting volume was GREAT SINGERS ON GREAT SINGING (1982), in which he made discerning comments on the art of many colleagues.

Hines' later appearances befitted his advancing years: he was Arkel, the elderly grandfather in PELLEAS ET MELISANDE (Rome, 1984), and the blind father in Mascagni's IRIS (Newark, 1989). His last stage appearance was as Sarastro, in New Orleans in 1998, when he was 77."

- Alan Blyth, THE GUARDIAN, 13 Feb., 2003





"With the end of the war Solti was appointed musical director of the Bavarian State Opera in Munich in 1946. In normal circumstances this prestigious post would have been an unthinkable appointment for a young and inexperienced conductor, but the leading German conductors such as Wilhelm Furtwangler, Clemens Krauss and Herbert von Karajan were prohibited from conducting pending the conclusion of denazification proceedings against them. Under Solti's direction, the company rebuilt its repertoire and began to recover its pre-war eminence. He benefited from the encouragement of the elderly Richard Strauss, in whose presence he conducted DER ROSENKAVALIER. In 1961 he became musical director of the Covent Garden Opera Company, London. During his ten-year tenure, he introduced changes that raised standards to the highest international levels. Under his musical directorship the status of the company was recognised with the grant of the title 'the Royal Opera'."

- Zillah Dorset Akron