Gotterdammerung  (Stiedry;  Harshaw, Windgassen, Uhde, Madeira, Bohme, Schech)    (3-Walhall 0366)
Item# OP2580
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Product Description

Gotterdammerung  (Stiedry;  Harshaw, Windgassen, Uhde, Madeira, Bohme, Schech)    (3-Walhall 0366)
OP2580. GÖTTERDÄMMERUNG, Live Performance, 2 March, 1957, w.Stiedry Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Margaret Harshaw, Hermann Uhde, Wolfgang Windgassen, Jean Madeira, Kurt Böhme, Marianne Schech, Lawrence Davidson, etc. (E.U.) 3-Walhall 0366. - 4035122653663

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“Margaret Harshaw (made her professional début in the dramatic mezzo-soprano rôle of Azucena in IL TROVATORE with The Philadelphia Operatic Society in 1934. She entered the graduate program at The Juilliard School in 1936, where she studied with Anna E. Schoen-René, who had been a student of Pauline Viardot-García and her brother Manuel García. It was at Juilliard where Harshaw, after singing the rôle of Dido in Purcell’s DIDO AND AEANEAS, met Walter Damrosch who prophesied: ‘My child, one day you will be Brünnhilde!’. She won the Metropolitan Opera’s ‘Auditions on the Air’ in 1942, and made her Met début as the second Norn in Wagner’s GÖTTERDÄMMERUNG. Gifted with an extended range, Harshaw sang many mezzo-soprano rôles for the next nine seasons before she entered soprano territory in 1951 when she sang the rôle of Senta in THE FLYING DUTCHMAN. By 1954 she had inherited the mantel of Kirsten Flagstad and Helen Traubel, and sang all the leading Wagnerian soprano rôles, including Isolde, Brünnhilde, Elisabeth, Kundry and Sieglinde. Harshaw retired in 1964 from the Metropolitan Opera after having sung 375 performances of 38 rôles in 25 works over 22 consecutive seasons. She then became a professor of voice at Indiana University in 1962, where she taught until 1993. She also taught at the Curtis Institute of Music and Westminster Choir College. Among her many students are Benita Valente, Vinson Cole, Matthew Polenzani, etc."

- Daniel James Shigo



“Two portrayals warrant greater approbation. Madeira this season moves up from the First Norn to Waltraute. Her voice is in peak condition and admirably employed: the tone is large, solid, smooth, and unbesmirched by vulgarities. Her imposing reading of the narrative is dramatically vivid, a high point of the performance. Gunther’s rôle is merely functional, but Uhde, the masterful interpretor, is a force in the unfolding drama….Uhde’s performance affirms that interpretive insight and convincing communication can be more powerful assets than innate vocal gifts might provide….though blessed with musical intelligence and reliable vocal technique, Harshaw has not been favored by nature with either adequate tonal mass or the enveloping timbre [her rôle requires]….Windgassen more than capably upholds his end of the enterprise….the overall quality of his portrayal deserves respect.”

- Paul Jackson, SIGN-OFF FOR THE OLD MET, p.215



“Hermann Uhde’s American mother was a student of the famous baritone Karl Scheidemantel. He was trained as a bass, by Philipp Kraus at the Opera School in Bremen, where he made his début as Titurel (1936). After engagements in Freiburg and Munich he appeared for the first time in baritone rôles at the Deutsches Theater im Haag in 1942. A prisoner-of-war from April 1945 to February 1946, he did not return to the stage until 1947. He subsequently appeared at the opera houses of Hamburg, Vienna and Munich where he became a member of the ensemble. He gained great success in rôles such as Mandryka, Gunther and Telramund, in which he was particularly admired. The artist was regularly invited to the Bayreuth Festival from 1951 to 1960 where he became one of its most important members, appearing as Holländer, Klingsor, Gunther, Donner, Wotan in RHEINGOLD, Telramund and Melot. He was also a guest at the Salzburg Festival and performed a superb Wozzeck at the Met (sung in English!) where he regularly appeared from 1955 to 1961 and again in 1964. He sang at the Grand Opéra Paris as well as at other European opera houses. He created several rôles, including Creon in Orff’s ANTIGONAE, the baritone rôles in Britten’s THE RAPE OF LUCRETIA and Wagner-Régeny’s DAS BERGWERK ZU FALUN. He died of a heart attack during a performance of Niels Viggo Bentzon’s FAUST III, at Copenhagen in 1965.”

- Andrea Shum-Binder, subito-cantabile



“The most important singer of the German Heldentenor repertory in the 1950s and 1960s, Wolfgang Windgassen employed his not-quite-heroic instrument, believable physique, and considerable musical intelligence to forge memorable performances on-stage and in the recording studio. Although his voice lacked the sensuous appeal of Melchior's or Völker's, it was never unattractive and never employed to obvious effect. Indeed, it conveyed a youthfulness that suited the young Siegfried especially well."

- Erik Eriksson, allmusic.com