Siegfried  (Konwitschny;  Hotter, Windgassen, Klein, Otakar Kraus, Varnay, Hoffgen)   (4-Walhall 0370)
Item# OP2625
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Product Description

Siegfried  (Konwitschny;  Hotter, Windgassen, Klein, Otakar Kraus, Varnay, Hoffgen)   (4-Walhall 0370)
OP2625. SIEGFRIED, Live Performance, 28 Sept., 1959, w.Konwitschny Cond. Royal Opera House Ensemble; Hans Hotter, Wolfgang Windgassen, Peter Klein, Otakar Kraus, Astrid Varnay, Marga Höffgen, etc. (E.U.) 4–Walhall 0370. - 4035122653700

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“Franz Konwitschny (1901-62) was a large and rotund fellow, a fine musician who is less known internationally than he should have been, mostly because he rarely ventured outside the communist controlled east European countries. He was for many years director of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, and his recordings with them include a fine stereo set of the Beethoven symphonies. Actually, he was a powerful Beethoven conductor, and his Eroica with the Staatskapelle Dresden is surely among the best of the 20th Century. He was a fine opera conductor also, and made excellent recordings of Wagner’s FLYING DUTCHMAN, TANNHÄUSER and TRISTAN."

- John P. McKelvey, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, May/June, 2012



”Almost forgotten a generation after his death, Franz Konwitschny, director of both the Gewandhaus Orchestra in Leipzig and the Berlin State Opera from 1949 until his death in 1962, was much the finest and by far the most successful East German conductor of his time. Konwitschny didn't seek to match the glamour of Herbert von Karajan, his West German opposite; he was interested in something else entirely. Born in 1901 at the height of German romantic idealism, Konwitschny came of age in the milieu of post-War modernism, and in his maturity the one influence tempered the other so that the classic Konwitschny performances were clean and lucid but enormously concentrated and unbearably intense. For latter-day [listeners] who know best Karajan's more charismatic recordings, Konwitschny…will clear the mind, cleanse the palette and sooth the spirit.”

- James Leonard, allmusic.com



“Hotter was far, far more than a Wagnerian….[he] sang Lieder at recitals and in the studio throughout his timeless career….All his interpretations evinced a care over matching text to music. Even in Wagner he gave a Lieder singer's attention to the words….In private he was a gentle giant, an engaging raconteur and an intelligent observer of the musical scene”

- Alan Blyth, GRAMOPHONE, March, 2004



“Of all the singers of the 20th century, the man whose voice and presence were most capable of conveying the essence of the archetypal father was bass-baritone Hans Hotter. Blessed with a huge, resonant instrument that could be scaled down to an intimate whisper, the man could sound invincible one minute and vulnerable the next. No matter what he sang, Hotter communicated a profundity and depth of spirit that seemed rooted in a primordial place of holiness and sagacity. If you can imagine a man whose voice could convincingly express the power of a God, the wisdom of a sage, and the humanity of an open-hearted mortal, you can begin to hear the sound of Hans Hotter in your head.

In the world of opera, Richard Wagner's Wotan, the God of Valhalla, is perhaps the greatest Daddy of them all. In DIE WALKÜRE, he has no choice but to punish his favorite daughter Brünnhilde for her sin of intervening in the affairs of mortals. But even as he puts his beloved daughter to sleep, protecting her with a ring of fire, he makes sure that love can dowse the flames and return her to life. It was the Wotan of Hans Hotter, more than of any other recorded singer, that most fully expressed the tortured godliness of this strangely mortal immortal.

At the same time as Hotter dominated the opera stage as Wotan, he became known as a supreme interpreter of German art song. With his voice pared down as necessary, Hotter's lieder interpretations evinced the same strength and surety that thundered through him when he strode across the stage carrying sword and shield.”

- Jason Serinus