Don Carlos    (Previtali;  Zampieri, Brouwenstijn, Protti, Jerome Hines, Hotter, Resnik)   (3-Living Stage 1027)
Item# OP2777
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Product Description

Don Carlos    (Previtali;  Zampieri, Brouwenstijn, Protti, Jerome Hines, Hotter, Resnik)   (3-Living Stage 1027)
OP2777. DON CARLOS, Live Performance, 15 Sept., 1962, Buenos Aires, w.Previtali Cond. Teatro Col�n Ensemble; Giuseppe Zampieri, Aldo Protti, Jerome Hines, Gr� Brouwenstijn, Regina Resnik, Hans Hotter, etc. (Slovenia) 3-Living Stage 1027. Long out-of-print, final copies! - 3830257410270

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"The Dutch soprano Gr Brouwenstijn was one of those singers whom audiences and record collectors truly seemed to love....She seemed personally involved in everything she did."

- Ralph V. Lucano, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, Sept./Oct., 2011





"The Dutch soprano Gr Brouwenstijn has long been held in the highest esteem within her own country, and within a circle of vocal connoisseurs, for the fearless vibrancy of her approach to the great hochdramatisch soprano roles, without ever compromising the standards and ideals of vocal beauty: hers is a voice of great strength and flexibility, fully able to meet the challenge of projecting both the scale and drama of Wagner's heroines while also inhabiting their more intimate confessions. Brouwenstijn made precious few recordings - most of what is left to us now derives from private tapes or radio archives of live performances"

- Zillah Dorset Akron





"The American bass Jerome Hines had a long and distinguished career at the Metropolitan Opera singing a wide variety of roles with true consistency of voice and style. He appeared with the company for more than 40 years from 1946. An imposing figure - he was 6ft 6in tall - he had a voluminous bass to match his stature.

His charismatic presence made him ideal for the many roles demanding a big personality. It was thus hardly surprising that Sarastro in THE MAGIC FLUTE, Gounod's Mephistopheles, the high priest Ramfis in AIDA, the Grand Inquisitor in DON CARLOS, Boris Godunov, and King Mark in TRISTAN UND ISOLDE were among his leading roles.

Although always faithful to the Met, Hines made many forays abroad. In 1953, he undertook Nick Shadow, with Glyndebourne, at the Edinburgh festival, in the first British performances of Stravinsky's THE RAKE'S PROGRESS. That led to engagements in leading houses in Europe and south America, and eventually to Bayreuth, where he sang Gurnemanz, King Mark and Wotan (1958-63). In 1958, he made his La Scala debut in the title part of Handel's HERCULES, and, in 1961, he first appeared at the San Carlo in Naples, in the title role of Boito's MEFISTOFELE. His Boris Godunov, at the Bolshoi in Moscow in 1962, was, by all accounts, a deeply impressive portrayal.

He was fortunate to arrive at the Met just as the opera house was in need of replacements for the great Ezio Pinza, who had decided to appear in SOUTH PACIFIC. Unlike his distinguished predecessor, Hines could also sing the German and Russian repertory, in addition to Italian and French. In all, his innate musicianship stood him in good stead. Most of his discs derived from live performances. They reveal a sterling voice, a refined style, consisting of a burnished tone, a fine line and exemplary diction, although he never seems to have have been a very profound interpreter.

Hines was both a deeply religious person and a good writer. He combined these qualities in his own opera, I AM THE WAY, a work about Jesus, performed, with Hines as the protagonist, at Philadelphia in 1969. The previous year, he had published his autobiography, THIS IS MY STORY, THIS IS MY SONG, but his most lasting volume was GREAT SINGERS ON GREAT SINGING (1982), in which he made discerning comments on the art of many colleagues.

Hines' later appearances befitted his advancing years: he was Arkel, the elderly grandfather in PELLEAS ET MELISANDE (Rome, 1984), and the blind father in Mascagni's IRIS (Newark, 1989). His last stage appearance was as Sarastro, in New Orleans in 1998, when he was 77."

- Alan Blyth, THE GUARDIAN, 13 Feb., 2003





�Regina Resnik won the Metropolitan Opera auditions and d�buted with great success at the Met on 6 December, 1944, as a last-minute replacement for Zinka Milanov. The role was Leonora in Verdi�s IL TROVATORE and over the years she performed many of opera�s most important roles on its most prominent stages, including those of the New York City Opera, the San Francisco Opera, Covent Garden and other European houses. Her best-known roles include Ellen Orford in Britten�s PETER GRIMES, Donna Anna and Donna Elvira in Mozart�s DON GIOVANNI and the title role in Bizet�s CARMEN. Later in her career she performed in musical theater and became a sought-after instructor and opera director. She was known for her strong dramatic skills and impeccable musicianship onstage and for her bold personality offstage. She displayed fearlessness from the beginning. Following the triumph of her first season, Resnik became a leading soprano at the Met, during which time she sang Rosalinde in this English-language production of DIE FLEDERMAUS, a delightful tour-de-force!

In 1942, she made her d�but at the New Opera Company of New York after being given 24 hours� notice that she was needed to substitute. Two years later, she made a similar last-minute substitution in her d�but at the Metropolitan Opera as Leonora, in IL TROVATORE. Each time she impressed. �All things considered, Miss Resnik�s d�but was an auspicious one�, a review of her Metropolitan d�but in THE NEW YORK TIMES said. �She has a strong, clear soprano, which, though occasionally marred by a tremolo, is both agile enough for the florid passages allotted to Leonora and forceful enough for the dramatic ones�.

Ms. Resnik became a much-admired soprano and toured widely through the mid-1950s, when she and others began to notice that her voice was darkening. A friend, the baritone Giuseppe Danise, helped persuade her to change, telling her he believed she had always been a mezzo. �It was the biggest gamble of my life, when I decided over two tumultuous years that perhaps I was not a soprano after all�, she told The Times in 1967. �There were many opinions: I was a soprano with low notes, or mezzo with high notes�. The gamble paid off, she said, and it ultimately provided her with better roles, including some of her most notable, as Carmen, Klyt�mnestra in ELEKTRA, Mistress Quickly in FALSTAFF and the Countess in PIQUE DAME. �I have really run the gamut�, she added, emphatic that she had not lost her upper register. �And my range is exactly the same today. Not one note higher or lower. But I was happier in the depth of my voice than in its height�.

Ms. Resnik graduated from James Monroe High School in the Bronx and studied music education at Hunter College, graduating in 1942.

�She was a totally American original�, said F. Paul Driscoll, the editor in chief of OPERA NEWS. �She was always very proud of being educated in the United States and beginning her career in the United States�. Mr. Driscoll emphasized Ms. Resnik�s resilience, particularly under Rudolf Bing, the sometimes autocratic general manager of the Met, for much of her career. �She embraced the opportunities she was given, and whether or not Mr. Bing thought they were star parts, she made them star parts�, Mr. Driscoll said. �Directors loved her, conductors loved her, and the audience loved her�.�

- William Yardley, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 9 Aug., 2013