Les Troyens   (Sebastian;  Regine Crespin, Guy Chauvet, Victor de Narke, Noemie Souza)      (2-Malibran 769)
Item# OP2996
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Product Description

Les Troyens   (Sebastian;  Regine Crespin, Guy Chauvet, Victor de Narke, Noemie Souza)      (2-Malibran 769)
OP2996. LES TROYENS, Live Performance, 28 May, 1964, Buenos Aires, w.Sébastian Cond. Teatro Colón Ensemble; Régine Crespin, Guy Chauvet, Victor de Narke, Noémie Souza, etc.; LES TROYENS - Excerpts, Live Performance, 24 May, 1956, Théatre des Champs Elysées, w.Rosenthal Cond. Ethel Semser & Louis Rialland. (France) 2-Malibran 769. - 7600003777690

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"Crespin was the greatest singer to come out of France in the past half century….She expressed herself through words rather than through obvious histrionic gestures, and few artists enunciated so clearly, in any language – English and German included. Her French, of course, was perfect, so lucidly projected that the soprano had every right to expect her listeners to understand her. She never felt the need to exaggerate….Flickers of nuance are always sufficient for the intelligent operagoer."

- Ralph V. Lucano, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, Sept./Oct., 2007



"[Crespin] was surely one of the greatest French singers of the 20th Century; in fact…one of the great singers on records, one whose art goes well beyond the merely vocal….Beyond its size, [her voice] had a beautiful shimmer about it, a glowing quality present in all registers."

- Henry Fogel, FANFARE, March/April, 2005



"Régine Crespin, the French operatic soprano and later mezzo-soprano, one of the most important vocal artists to emerge from France in the decades after World War II was widely admired for the elegance, warmth and subtlety of her singing, especially in the French and German operatic repertories. Early on, the natural carrying power of her voice seemed to point to a career as a dramatic soprano. Indeed, she made her 1950 début at the regional company in Mulhouse, France, singing Elsa in Wagner’s LOHENGRIN. Yet Ms Crespin’s singing was imbued with nuanced phrasing, telling attention to text, creamy lyricism and lovely high pianissimos. While she had an enveloping voice, she always seemed to keep something in reserve, leading some listeners to sense a touch too much French restraint. But most opera buffs valued Ms Crespin for the effortless richness, lyrical nobility and subtle colorings of her singing. She was also a sophisticated actress whose Junoesque presence commanded attention. Ms Crespin’s Metropolitan Opera début came in 1962 as the Marschallin in DER ROSENKAVALIER, directed by the soprano Lotte Lehmann, who had been the most renowned interpreter of the role. Reviewing Ms Crespin’s portrayal, the New York Times critic Harold C. Schonberg wrote that she gave ‘a simply beautiful performance’ enriched with ‘all kinds of delicate shading’. But when she let out her full voice, he added, it ‘soared over the orchestra and all over the house — big, confident and beautiful’. In 1967 she sang Sieglinde to Birgit Nilsson’s Brünnhilde at the Met, with Herbert von Karajan conducting a production that he also directed. Reviewing that performance for The Times of London, the critic Conrad L. Osborne wrote that ‘Nilsson and Crespin spurring each other on make for the sort of thing one remembers with a chill for years’. In later life Ms Crespin won wide recognition as a voice teacher. During some 1995 master classes at the Mannes College of Music in New York, the students were enraptured not only by her insightful critiques, but by her insider tales about opera stars."

- Anthony Tommasini, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 6 July, 2007



“French tenor Guy Chauvet was born in Montluçon 2 October 1933. In 1954 he was co-winner of a tenor competition in Cannes, along with Alain Vanzo, Gustave Botiaux, Tony Poncet, and Roger Gardes - a pretty impressive assemblage of talent! Chauvet made his Paris Opéra début in 1959, starting with comprimario parts, finally advancing to lead roles. He soon established himself as an important presence, both in France and, ultimately, in many of the world’s other major opera houses. He sang numerous roles in the French and Italian repertoire, and became particularly well-known for such heroic parts as Aeneas and Samson.

Guy Chauvet was without question a talented singer, and one who filled a pressing need during a time when the grand tradition of the French heroic tenor was in decline….Typical of this singer’s work in general, the diction is idiomatic and crystal-clear....Chauvet displays all of the other qualities that are the heart and soul of great French tenor singing - a seamless legato, a masterful application of the mixed voice, and an ideal balance between elegance and passion. It’s also quite impressive to hear Chauvet demonstrate an ease and mastery of style and technique in music ranging from the 18th century to verismo. And if all of these attributes inspire comparison to Chauvet’s great predecessor, Georges Thill, the singing on this disc justifies such comparisons. We hear some absolutely first-rate French tenor singing. Highly recommended.”

K. M., classicalcdreview, Sept., 2004



“Guy Chauvet was the youngest of what Jean Giraudeau (a noted tenor himself) and Jean Gourret in their comprehensive book LES PRESTIGIEUX TÉNORS DE L’OPÉRA DE PARIS termed ‘La Dernier Vague’ (The Last Wave). They were aware of the gradual decline in the number of fine tenors that used to dominate the French operatic scene during the first half of the 20th century….”

- Alan Bilgora, THE RECORD COLLECTOR, 2014



“French tenor Guy Chauvet was born in Montluçon 2 October 1933. In 1954 he was co-winner of a tenor competition in Cannes, along with Alain Vanzo, Gustave Botiaux, Tony Poncet, and Roger Gardes—a pretty impressive assemblage of talent! Chauvet made his Paris Opéra début in 1959, starting with comprimario parts, finally advancing to lead roles. He soon established himself as an important presence, both in France and, ultimately, in many of the world’s other major opera houses. He sang numerous roles in the French and Italian repertoire, and became particularly well-known for such heroic parts as Aeneas and Samson.

Guy Chauvet was without question a talented singer, and one who filled a pressing need during a time when the grand tradition of the French heroic tenor was in decline….This recent reissue by Malibran of recordings Guy Chauvet made for the Vega label early in his career. Chauvet sings all of the selections, including those from Italian opera, in French. Typical of this singer’s work in general, the diction is idiomatic and crystal-clear. What sets these Vega recordings apart from Chauvet’s later work is the gorgeous vocal quality and the wide variety of colors at the tenor’s disposal. The sweetness of the young Chauvet’s timbre is something to savor. In addition, Chauvet displays all of the other qualities that are the heart and soul of great French tenor singing—a seamless legato, a masterful application of the mixed voice, and an ideal balance between elegance and passion. It’s also quite impressive to hear Chauvet demonstrate an ease and mastery of style and technique in music ranging from the 18th century to verismo. And if all of these attributes inspire comparison to Chauvet’s great predecessor, Georges Thill, the singing on this disc justifies such comparisons. We hear some absolutely first-rate French tenor singing. Highly recommended.”

K. M., classicalcdreview, Sept., 2004