Alexander Brailowsky;  Munch;  Steinberg     (RCA 61656)
Item# P0012
$19.90
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Product Description

Alexander Brailowsky;  Munch;  Steinberg     (RCA 61656)
P0012. ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY: Waltz in e, recorded 7 Feb., 1950; Nocturne in D-flat, recorded 1949; w.MUNCH Cond. Boston S.O.: Concerto #2 in f, recorded 1954, Symphony Hall, Boston; w.STEINBERG Cond. RCA S.O.: Concerto #1 in e, recorded 1949 (Chopin). RCA 61656. Very long out-of-print, Final Copy! - 090266165629

CRITIC REVIEW:

“Critic Virgil Thomson once referred to Russian pianist Alexander Brailowsky (1896-1976) as ‘an honest virtuoso’. Alexander Brailowsky, at the age of eight, became a student in the Conservatory of Kiev. Later, in 1911, he went to Vienna to study with Leschetizky, but the beginning of World War I caused him to reside in Switzerland. After the war, Brailowsky made his Paris début in 1924, playing a complete cycle of the works of Chopin. This series included two sonatas, eleven polonaises, four scherzi, three impromptus, nineteen nocturnes, twenty-five preludes, twenty-seven etudes, and fifty-one mazurkas. This performance was repeated three times in Brussels, Zürich, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, Montevideo, and other principal cities. A successful tour of all the principal cities of the world was then made.

On 19 November, 1924, he made his American début in Aeolian Hall, New York. Brailowsky received an excellent review by the noted Olin Downes, music critic of The New York Times. On 31 October, 1938, he was soloist with the Pasdeloup Orchestra of Paris where he played the Chopin e minor Concerto and the Mendelssohn g minor Concerto, and he received a stupendous applause for his interpretation of the two concerti.

Appearances as soloist were made with major symphony orchestras and his interpretations of the works of Chopin brought him world-wide acclaim. Brailowsky was noted for his large repertory and he recorded for Victor the works of Chopin, Beethoven, Mendlessohn, Scarlatti, Schumann, and others. His recordings for Victor were numerous and used by students as examples of performances of the Chopin works. During a series of nineteen recitals in Buenos Aires, he never repeated a single work."

—Gary Lemco, Audiophile Audition, 30 July, 2014