Clara Haskil;  Carl Schuricht    (Philharmonie 06017)
Item# P1080
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Product Description

Clara Haskil;  Carl Schuricht    (Philharmonie 06017)
P1080. CLARA HASKIL, w.Schuricht Cond. Stuttgart Radio S.O.: Concerto #9 in E-flat, K.271; Concerto #19 in F, K.459 (both Mozart). (Germany) Philharmonie 06017, recorded 1952/’56, in Slipcase. - 4250317416179

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"Clara Haskil gave her first concert at the age of nine, and she garnered immediate public attention. She studied with Richard Robert and later continued her studies with Alfred Cortot at the Paris Conservatory where she received the Grand Prix at fourteen. After World War I she appeared with Enesco, Casals, Stokowski and Ysaye. On these recordings from 1952-56, Haskil plays Mozart's piano concerti Nos. 9 and 19 with the Radio-Sinfoniorchester Stuttgart.

Haskil's return visit [to Boston] surpassed all expectations. A series of concerts with the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Charles Münch and an appearance at Carnegie Hall created a sensation and were reported in TIME magazine. Rudolf Eli wrote in the Boston Herald, ‘One of those most magical revelations that occurs in music once in a generation ... the most beautiful performance of Beethoven’s Third Concerto I have ever heard or expect to hear again’.

I first heard Clara Haskil’s name mentioned by Dinu Lipatti after a recital he gave in Switzerland. When I congratulated him on his Mozart playing, Lipatti said, ‘In two weeks’ time you must hear Clara play Mozart. Then you will realize how far the rest of us are from the truth’. I was young at the time, but the name stuck in my mind. Who was this mysterious Clara?

As Clara sat down the music materialized as if from nowhere. Her arm seemed to glide over the keyboard without preparation, just as a flat stone skims across the water. This was so typical of her playing; nothing seemed to start or end, and everything became timeless. Admiration and international fame came late in life for Clara Haskil, in a career beset by poor health and the adversities of a world war. Dinu Lipatti described her playing as ‘the sum of perfection on earth’, Wilhelm Backhaus called it ‘the most beautiful in the world’, Tatyana Nikoleyeva burst into tears when she first heard Haskil...."

- Peter Feuchtwanger

“Carl Schuricht was among the most distinguished German conductors of the inter- and post-War years. He studied composition with Engelbert Humperdinck at the Hochschule für Musik in Berlin, and then with Max Reger in Leipzig. He became music director in Wiesbaden in 1911 and elected to stay there until 1944. From this base he made frequent guest conducting appearances elsewhere and appeared at many summer music festivals. He was known for his interest in French music and other modern compositions, and frequently played music of Debussy, Ravel, Schönberg, and Stravinsky. He toured abroad often, and made his first U.S. appearance in 1927. For many years he conducted annual summer concert series in Scheveningen, Holland, a resort town next to the capital city, The Hague. In recognition of this, the Dutch government gave him the Order or Orange-Nassau in 1938.

In 1942 he was appointed conductor of the Dresden Philharmonic Orchestra. He often opposed the Nazi government's policies, and in 1944 fled to Switzerland, where he resided thereafter. As many German conductors who had favored modern music in the inter-War years did, he settled firmly to the traditional symphonic repertory in the post-War years and thereafter became strongly associated with performances in the Romantic tradition, with rhythmic freedom and a smooth, beautiful and expressive sound.

He was chosen to conduct the re-opening, after the War, of the Salzburg Festival in Austria in 1946, and continued his frequent guest conducting appearances and associations with summer festivals, including the Ravinia Festival in Chicago and the Tanglewood Festival with the Boston Symphony Orchestra in Massachusetts. He often conducted the London Philharmonic and the BBC Symphony Orchestra. He was chosen to share conducting duties with André Cluytens when the Vienna Philharmonic made its first American tour in 1956. In later years he often took the podium with that orchestra and the Berlin Philharmonic and frequently conducted the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra.”

- Joseph Stevenson, allmusic.com