Busch String Quartet, Vol. VII;  Rudolf Serkin      (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-354)
Item# S0692
$19.90
Availability: Usually ships the same business day

Product Description

Busch String Quartet, Vol. VII;  Rudolf Serkin      (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-354)
S0692. BUSCH STRING QUARTET, Vol. VII: Quartet in C, Op.59, #3 (Beethoven), recorded 1933; w.RUDOLF SERKIN: Piano Quintet in E-flat, Op.44 (Schumann), recorded 22 May, 1942. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL 78-354. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. [These venerated performances are offered here in extraordinary sound quality having been copied from pristine PW Columbia & PW Victor Pressings which offer remarkably quiet surfaces.]

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“…supremely accomplished performances that are steeped in – and nourished by – a profound performing tradition. No collection worth the name can afford to be without them..”

- James Inverne, GRAMOPHONE, July, 2008



“…the Busch offer something very special – an ‘old world’ form of shining sincerity, dedication and truthfulness….at all points the Busch Quartet’s music-making is on a very exalted level.”

- Alan Sanders, CLASSIC RECORD COLLECTOR, Spring, 2008



"One of the major chamber music forces of the first half of the 20th Century, the [Busch String Quartet] was in many respects a perfect complement to the occasionally more celebrated Budapest Quartet. Whereas the Budapest’s Beethoven was purged of many of the performance practices typical of the earlier half of the century, the Busch did not hesitate to incorporate them….these parameters never spill over into tastelessness."

- Mortimer H. Frank, CLASSIC RECORD COLLECTOR, Summer, 2007



“Rudolf Serkin joined the international elite while still a teen-ager and by incessant, tireless practice held ranking for more than half a century as an artist of the highest type. He was an eminent 20th-century representative of a Viennese tradition that mingled the classical and romantic styles of pianism.

Among the dozens of recordings he made, those in which he teamed as a chamber-music partner with Adolf Busch, the German violinist, are especially prized by collectors. It was Mr. Busch who promoted the young pianist's European career, presenting him as a soloist in Bach's Brandenburg Concerto #5 at Mr. Serkin's Berlin début in 1921. Mr. Serkin regarded Busch as one of the three musicians who most deeply influenced him. The others were his onetime composition teacher, Arnold Schönberg, and the conductor Arturo Toscanini. Mr. Serkin studied composition, first with Joseph Marx and later with Schönberg, and published a string quartet. He made his concert début with the Vienna Symphony at 12, playing the Mendelssohn g minor Concerto. At 17, Mr. Serkin met Busch, who was looking for a pianist to accompany him in a concert. They struck up a friendship and Busch took the younger musician along with him to Berlin on tour. Busch was then 30 years old and internationally established as a violinist. Soon Mr. Serkin was appearing in the great cities of Europe both as accompanist and as chamber-music performer with the Busch Chamber Players.

In April 1933, with the Nazis in the ascendancy in Germany, Busch stirred a controversy by refusing to appear at a Brahms centennial celebration in Hamburg. Although not Jewish himself, he was offended because a young Jewish pianist had been denied permission to play. The pianist was Rudolf Serkin.

Mr. Serkin had moved with the Busch family to Darmstadt in 1922. In 1927 they all left Germany and settled near Basel, Switzerland. After Hitler's rise to power, they applied for Swiss citizenship, which they held until all became American citizens in 1950.

Mr. Serkin first played in the United States in 1933, with Busch at a Coolidge Festival concert in the Library of Congress in Washington. He did not perform here again until his formal début in New York on 20 Feb., 1936, when he appeared as soloist with the New York Philharmonic under Toscanini. His recital début came on 11 Jan., 1937, at Carnegie Hall. The next year Mr. Serkin and Busch performed the complete cycle of Beethoven sonatas at Town Hall. In 1939, Mr. Serkin joined the piano faculty of the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia, where he taught for 36 years. From 1968 to 1975, he was director of the institute. Great though Mr. Serkin's success was as a concert pianist, perhaps his most lasting impact on musical life was as a teacher and inspirational force. In 1949, he helped found the Marlboro Festival in Vermont. Living in the same area at the time were Adolf and Herman Busch, Blanche Honegger Moyse, Louis Moyse and Marcel Moyse, all renowned musicians who had also left Europe. They merged their talents and quickly turned Marlboro into an American chamber-music mecca and a magnet for talent. The word ‘Marlboro’ came to stand for musicianship of a special, ardent type. Each summer, Mr. Serkin and his circle were joined by like-minded artists, including Pablo Casals, Alexander Schneider, Felix Galimir, Mieczyslaw Horszowski, Jaime and Ruth Laredo, Eugene Istomin, Pina Carmirelli and Peter Serkin (Mr. Serkin's son, himself a world-class pianist). At Marlboro, Mr. Serkin made a point of being a musician among colleagues, as ready to turn pages for other players as to perform. Friends of Mr. Serkin -- and he seemed to have no enemies -- spoke with incredulity of his unfailing good humor, his shy and sweet-tempered manner with everyone, the unknown as well as the famous. A longtime colleague, after giving the phenomenon some thought, remarked: 'It's impossible to talk about anybody's being saintly in this age, but Serkin is'."

- Donal Henahan, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 10 May, 1991



“Each of these disks, from Canadian engineer Yves St Laurent… [feature] St Laurent's natural transfer – made without filtering, like all his dubbings – it is easy to listen to, despite the surface noise.”

- Tully Potter, CLASSICAL RECORD QUARTERLY, Summer, 2011