Franco Corelli & Gian Giacomo Guelfi;  Basile           (Myto 953.132)
Item# V0200
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Product Description

Franco Corelli & Gian Giacomo Guelfi;  Basile           (Myto 953.132)
V0200. FRANCO CORELLI & GIAN GIACOMO GUELFI; Basile Cond. RAI Ensemble: Forza - Acts III & IV, 6 Feb., 1957, Torino; GUELFI, CORELLI, TASSINARI & BENETTI; Basile Cond. RAI Ensemble: Carmen - Excerpts, 15 Dec., 1961, Torino. (Italy) Myto 953.132. Very long out-of-print, Final Sealed Copy! - 8014399001328

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"Franco Corelli had been singing for well over a decade when he made his Met debut in 1961 at the age of 40. The first attraction in any Corelli performance is the voice itself. Solid and evenly produced from bottom to top, with no audible seams between registers. The middle and lower parts of the voice are dark and richly colored. The top is stunningly brilliant, and never thins out or turns hard. It is a once-in-a-generation kind of voice if your generation is lucky, and in the four decades since his retirement in 1976 we have had nothing like it for visceral power. Some critics complained because Corelli would hold high notes well beyond their value in the score. But if we listen to singers from the past whose careers overlapped with the great Italian opera composers, and who often worked with them, we can easily conclude that the composers expected it. (A recording of an aria from Francesco Cilea's ADRIANA LECOUVREUR by tenor Fernando de Lucia, with the composer accompanying at the piano, exposes liberties that go far beyond anything Corelli ever did, and Cilea echoes those 'distortions' at the keyboard.)"

- Henry Fogel, FANFARE





"Giangiacomo Guelfi [not to be confused with Carlo Guelfi, a younger baritone] studied at the Centro Lirico in Florence, as well as with legendary Italian baritone Titta Ruffo, and made his opera debut in the title role of Verdi's RIGOLETTO in 1950, an exceptionally young age for such a work. He won the Spoleto Experimental Theater Prize and made his La Scala debut in 1952 as The Visitor in Castro's PROSERPINA Y EL EXTRANJERO. He made his London debut two years later at Drury Lane as GĂ©rard in Giordano's ANDREA CHENIER. Though he drew considerable acclaim in a 1957 performance of Verdi's I DUE FOSCARI in Venice, and he was considered a rising star during the late '50s and early '60s, it was not until his 1964 performance of Verdi's MACBETH at La Scala that he was acknowledged as a full-fledged star. He made his Metropolitan debut in 1970 as Scarpia. He was particularly admired during his prime for his powerful voice, but like many possessors of such voices, occasionally indulged in bellowing and, toward the end of his career, relied excessively on extra-musical vocal effects."

- Anne Feeney, allmusic.com