Marcel Journet        (2-Malibran 611)
Item# V0890
$39.90
Availability: Usually ships the same business day

Product Description

Marcel Journet        (2-Malibran 611)
V0890. MARCEL JOURNET:  Arias from La Reine de Saba, Sigurd, Cléopatre, Le Chalet, Les Contes d’Hoffmann, Faust, Robert le Diable, Les Huguenots, Mignon, Lakmé, Philémon et Baucis, La Damnation de Faust, Barbiere, La Favorite, La Jolie Fille de Perth, Le Jongleur de Notre-Dame, Lucia, La Sonnambula, I Puritani, Stabat Mater  (Rossini),  Mefistofele, Nerone, Ernani, Marta, La Boheme, Der Freischütz, Lohengrin, Tannhäuser, Das Rheingold, Götterdämmerung, Zauberflöte & Don Giovanni; Le Filibustier (Georges). (France) 2-Malibran 611. - 3760003776117

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“In this day and age, rife with pushed-down baritones who pass themselves off as true basses, and many authentic basses who choke when attempting a high E flat, it is comforting to listen to Marcel Journet’s recordings….With his clarion tones, convincing acting ability and adaptability to any rôle in the lyric repertoire…he possessed so many enviable qualities as an artist that we can certainly consider him as one of the great singers of the Twentieth Century.”

- Jean-Pierre Mouchon, THE RECORD COLLECTOR, 2002



“Journet’s voice, unlike any other voice I know, aged like a great wine. It is truly a unique, and therefore thrilling, experience to hear an artist who after thirty intensive years of career has preserved his voice virtually intact and who can then use this voice as an instrument of expression. While some listeners may find hearing Hans Sachs sung in French or Italian somewhat disconcerting, for me there is no more sympathetic and melancholy Sachs on record; there is no more desperately crazed Athanaël on record. His two recordings from Boito’s Nerone—that magnificent and ignored masterpiece—are stunning. Even the musically undistinguished Luce songs, among his last recordings, are transfigured…. And I now can fully understand Max de Schauensee who, having heard Journet during the 1920s, wrote that Journet’s voice “... sparkled like a great red jewel.”

- Victor Girard, Marston Program Notes