Marko Rothmuller;  Suzanne Gyr           (2-Symposium 1098/99)
Item# V1411
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Product Description

Marko Rothmuller;  Suzanne Gyr           (2-Symposium 1098/99)
V1411. MARKO ROTHMÜLLER, w.Suzanne Gyr (Pf.):  Schubert Songs, incl. Die Winterreise;  Moussorgsky:  Songs and Dances of Death.  (England) 2-Symposium 1098/99, recorded 1945, EMI. 

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"Rothmüller's voice, in common with all the greatest singers, has an immediately recognizable quality....This CD is compiled from Swiss HMV 78 rpm issues from 1945, and the original discs are sufficiently rare to have acquired almost legendary status. After listening to these brilliantly compelling performances, one can only feel grateful that they have now been preserved for posterity."

- Vivian A. Liff, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, 1991



“Rothmüller is not easily assigned to any particular country. He was born 31 December, 1908 near Zagreb (making him Croatian) but the Nazi tyranny forced him, being Jewish, to flee to Zürich, making him Swiss….The singer’s slightly distorted accent added a curious edge to the voice that makes it readily distinguishable.”

- Charles H. Parsons, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, May/June, 2009



"Marko Rothmüller, who made his Metropolitan Opera début in Wagner's MEISTERSINGER VON NÜRNBERG in 1959, had a singing career that began with Weber's FREISCHÜTZ in Hamburg in 1932. He rejoined the Met's company for the 1964-1965 season. By then, he had been appointed a professor of voice in Bloomington, where he started teaching in 1955. He was a native of Croatia, and studied at the Zagreb Music Academy. He went to Vienna to train as a singer with Franz Steiner and study composition with Alban Berg; the title role of Berg's WOZZECK became a signature piece. He studied for that role with Erich Kleiber, who conducted the Berlin première of WOZZECK in 1925.

After his engagement at the Hamburg Opera, Mr Rothmüller established himself as one of Europe's most promising baritones, scoring successes particularly in works by Wagner and Verdi. Because he was of Jewish descent, he left Germany in the early 1930's to sing in Zagreb and Zürich, where he appeared regularly until 1947. His European engagements then took him to the Vienna State Opera, Covent Garden and the Glyndebourne Opera at the Edinburgh International Festival of Music and Drama.

In 1954, he returned to Germany for the first time with a guest appearance in West Berlin. His American début was with the New York City Center Opera as Amonasro in Verdi's AÏDA in 1948, after which he traveled extensively in this country for occasional opera and concert engagements."

- Wolfgang Saxon, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 22 Jan., 1993



“Suzanne Gyr, born 8 June, 1899 in Lorraine, France, started taking piano lessons with one of Cortot's pupils. In 1930 she entered Cortot's class at the École Normale in Paris and studied the piano with him for five years. At the same time she took courses in history of music and harmony with Nadia Boulanger. She gave recitals in France, but WW II intervened. She settled in Geneva and married Edouard Gyr, a Swiss violinist and a member of the Orchestre Romande. She gave recitals in Switzerland, where her brilliant success was acclaimed. She recorded for HMV as soloist, also together with the baritone Marko Rothmüller, all issued only on the HMV Swiss Series. She died 3 March, 1974.”

- Ned Ludd