Aureliano Pertile      (Malibran 150)
Item# V2558
$19.90
Availability: Usually ships the same business day

Product Description

Aureliano Pertile      (Malibran 150)
V2558. AURELIANO PERTILE: Columbia disks, incl. Musica proibita; Maria, Mari; O sole mio; Arias from Lohengrin, Fedora, Andrea Chénier, Manon Lescaut, Pagliacci, Cavalleria, Iris, Tosca, Mefistofele, Adriana Lecouvreur, L’Africana & La Traviata. (France) Malibran 150, recorded 1922-33.



CRITIC REVIEWS:

"At La Scala Pertile became Toscanini's favorite tenor (after Caruso and long before Jan Peerce in New York), singing almost everything from LUCIA and IL TROVATORE to I MAESTRI CANTORI (the Italian rendering of DIE MEISTERSINGER) under his direction; he created the title roles in the NERONEs of Boito (in 1924) and Mascagni (in 1935). In December of 1923, although Gatti had the tenors Miguel Fleta, Beniamino Gigli, Giacomo Lauri-Volpi, and Giovanni Martinelli on his roster, with some touch of regret he must have read this message from one of his Italian agents: 'As you will read in the papers La Scala has become il teatro 'PERTILE'. All the operas are sung by him, the only tenor! His recordings reveal a very present nobility of spirit. Moreover, his attention to binding notes together into an unimpeachable legato placed him among the greats. "

- Robert Tuggle, THE METROPOLITAN OPERA ARCHIVES





“I would have to say that after Caruso, [Pertile] was my favorite tenor to sing with. He didn’t have the most beautiful voice, but it was what he did with it. Pertile was one of the best actors I can remember. He really became the character he was singing, and he was so careful, so supportive and cooperative with the other cast members – just like Caruso was.”

Rosa Ponselle, ROSA PONSELLE, A CENTENARY BIOGRAPHY, p.238





“…you have to salute a man who is singing with burning sincerity: a tenor who, within his own field and despite his faults, is capable of the most refined, imaginative and memorable art, a voice of unique character, and a communicator whose utterance goes (in Beethoven’s phrase) ‘from the heart to the heart’.”

J. B. Steane, SINGERS OF THE CENTURY, Vol. I, pp.144-45