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Since 1972



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LUCREZIA BORI is celebrated by

Immortal Performances . . .

Yves St Laurent presents the

Met’s 1954 PELLEAS conducted by PIERRE MONTEUX . . .

NADIA BOULANGER, Vol. 2 . . .

and IVRY GITLIS . . .

and ‘SALE’ titles continue. . .



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  • LUCREZIA BORI: A Tribute, incl. LA RONDINE - Act 2, with Mario Chamlee, Live Performance, 8 Oct., 1934 St. Louis Opera, Live Performance, (not Chicago nor San Francisco [as erroneously assumed in the past]); LA BOHEME - Act 4, final scene, w.Carlo Sabajno, Cond. La Scala Ensemble; Tito Schipa, Ernesto Badini, Luigi Manfrini, Aristide Baracchi & Thea Vitulli, recorded 1925; Act 1, final scene, w.Otto Klemperer, Cond. Los Angeles Phil., & Joseph Bentonelli – Live Performance, 6 June, 1937; MANON – Act 3, scene 2, w.Louis Hasselmans Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Richard Crooks & Leon Rothier – Live Performance, 29 March, 1936 (Bori's Met Farewell), including Lucrezia Bori’s speech; L’ENFANT PRODIGUE - Azaël! Azaël! Pourquoi m'as-tu quitte?, w.Goossens Cond. Met Opera Orch., Live Performance, 30 Dec., 1934; Arias from La Boheme, Madama Butterfly, Louise, La Fille du Regiment, Pagliacci, Mignon & La Rondine – recorded 1925-35. (Canada) 2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1136. Restoration and Transfers by Richard Caniell. Notes by Richard Caniell & William Russell. With elaborate 46pp booklet. (V2650)

    “The Spanish soprano Lucrezia Bori (1887–1960) is an extremely interesting artist, in that she achieved stardom without a truly spectacular aspect to her singing. Her voice was apparently not large, her top was somewhat limited, and when you first hear it, your reaction might very well be something along the lines of ‘well, that’s pretty’. The more one listens, however, the more one appreciates Bori’s greatness as an artist. Immortal Performances’ two-disc tribute affords that opportunity.

    What we observe as we listen is a pure, bright lyric soprano that that she used with great expressivity and musical imagination, along with a technique that allowed her to maintain a consistency of quality at all dynamic levels. For example, in Mimi’s farewell aria in LA BOHEME, Bori spins two extraordinary diminuendi, making evident the character’s regret at having to say goodbye (which, of course, by the end of the act she reverses). Those are the kinds of moments that make the listener catch his breath. Bori’s talent was perfectly suited to opera’s fragile female characters, and to that she added a wit that registered perfectly in comic roles. It is unfortunate that although she was a very important artist at the Met and a favorite of Met audiences, for some reason Bori was not assigned many broadcasts, the result being that we do not have as many examples of her art as we should.

    Throughout the fairly wide range of repertoire on this set, one is repeatedly impressed by Bori’s ability to convey tenderness and fragility as well as strength and even power, and she does it all through classically fine singing. Her intonation is flawless, her legato perfectly even, and her singing a consistent model of lyrical grace and elegance while never short-changing the dramatic moment.

    The set begins with a live second act from Puccini’s LA RONDINE. The source of this performance has been questioned, but Immortal Performances documents it clearly as being a St. Louis Opera broadcast from October 8, 1934. The Ruggero is the fine American lyric tenor Mario Chamlee. Bori, like most singers, was more dramatically expressive when on stage, and this is a particularly vivid example. One regrets that Magda’s great aria, ‘Chi il bel sogno di Doretta’, is in the first act rather than the second, so we don’t get to hear that. But what we do hear is a passionate and beautifully sung act from a Puccini opera that is rarely treated to this level of singing.

    Producer Richard Caniell has successfully worked to improve the flawed original sound, and he gives a brief example by including a brief sample of the bad mike placement with an overly prominent bassoon. This is not the first release of the RONDINE act, but it is far superior to the earlier one with which I am familiar. This set also includes Bori’s 1937 RCA recording of ‘Ore dolce e divine’, which is very lovely.

    The other major extract is the excerpt from the Metropolitan Opera Gala Farewell for Bori on March 29, 1936. Because NBC would not permit enough time for the entire concert to be broadcast, only the MANON scene and the speeches were aired. Richard Crooks is a very elegant Des Grieux, and Bori’s Manon balances all of the elements of Massenet’s complex character: delicacy, elegance, tenderness, and strength. This must have been an extraordinarily moving event for her, and her touching speech makes that clear, yet her singing is flawless. Following is an RCA recordings from 1937 that Bori made of three excerpts from MANON, which demonstrate that same balance of vocal, musical, and dramatic virtues. ‘Adieu, notre petite table’ is particularly touching, with her characteristic attention to text and shading.

    Another live broadcast included here is the final scene from the first act of LA BOHEME from a Hollywood Bowl concert of June 6, 1937. The tenor is Joseph Bentonelli (an American-born Joseph Benton), who sings Rodolfo’s aria very prosaically, followed by the completely involved, coquettish, and imaginative Bori in Mimi’s aria. Caniell makes the point in his notes that Bentonelli must have been paying attention, because he is more attentive to details of shading in the duet, even though his voice is still a generic one. Otto Klemperer, not a conductor we associate with Puccini, has a very good feel for the music. Bori’s singing is like a master class in how to phrase the aria and how to make every word mean something. The original recording has some static and compression problems, but Caniell has made it more than listenable. For those to whom this is important, I will note that the ending of the duet is transposed down a half-tone.

    In the bonus material the RCA recordings of arias and scenes, mostly made in the late 1920s, demonstrate Bori’s gifts flawlessly. The label recorded Bori with Tito Schipa in the final scene of LA BOHEME. With typical corporate thinking, however, RCA chose not to pay for a baritone and second soprano to sing Marcello and Musetta’s lines, leaving gaping holes in the music. Caniell has seamlessly spliced in the missing parts from RCA’s complete recording of the opera, also conducted by Carlo Sabajno. If In 1928, there had been an artistic vision functioning at RCA, they might have recorded the complete opera with Bori and Schipa, but that didn’t happen. This fragment is therefore treasurable. The way Bori holds on to the next-to-last note of ‘Sono andate’, as if she were trying to hold onto life itself, will break your heart. Schipa is wonderful in his brief turn as Rodolfo, and all we can do is think about the missed opportunity.

    Butterfly’s ‘Un bel di’ is sung with a less dramatic voice than we have become used to, thanks to the likes of Renata Tebaldi. Bori is more in the Toti dal Monte tradition, and we remember that this is a fragile, and very young, Japanese girl. Every word, every phrase, is articulated with meaning. The aria is not sung to the gallery but intimately to Suzuki, remonstrating her for her lack of faith.

    All of these recordings have been correctly pitched and cleaned up to the fullest extent possible. In the two arias from Donizetti’s LA FILLE DU REGIMENT Bori shows her spunky comedic sense and a fluid coloratura. (These are live performances for which the source is unclear.) ‘Depuis le jour’ from Charpentier’s LOUISE has some lovely moments, but it strikes me as something not as comfortable for Bori compared with the rest of the material here. On the other hand, the aria from Debussy’s L’ENFANT PRODIGUE is absolutely masterful, and also surprisingly successful is ‘Connais-tu le pays’ from Thomas’ MIGNON, an aria usually sung by an alto. Nedda’s aria from PAGLIACCI, which I generally can take or leave, is absolutely riveting here, delivered with energy and elan perfectly depicting the free spirit that is Nedda.

    The booklet included with the set is up to the usual high standards of Immortal Performances. William Russell, one of the label’s regular contributors, provides a very knowledgeable and well-written tribute to, and analysis of, Bori’s art. Caniell provides insightful commentary as well and his helpful recording notes. The photos that round out the booklet are one more attraction to an extremely satisfying package.”


    - Henry Fogel, FANFARE




    "Once again, IP has given us a glorious tribute to an important singer, a tribute that not only casts an appreciative light upon her artistry, but also upon her colleagues and their contributions to a glorious time in operatic history. Recommended with the utmost enthusiasm. 5 Stars: Immortal Performances’ superb tribute to the beloved soprano Lucrezia Bori"


    - Ken Meltzer, FANFARE




    “One need only listen to a few moments of…Lucrezia Bori (who sang at the Met from the 1910s to the 1930s) to realize how she could put her relatively light voice repeatedly through a role like Nedda in PAGLIACCI and retain freshness. She was intensely dramatic and imaginative, but never at the expense of her superbly clear attack and lyrical poise. Her 1914 recording of Nedda's aria can be set beside her radio broadcast of it from the late '30s; the voice is nearly unchanged.”


  • - Will Crutchfield, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 21 Sept., 1986






  • PELLEAS ET MELISANDE, Live Performance, 2 Jan., 1954, w.Monteux Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Nadine Conner, Theodore Uppman, Martial Singher, Martha Lipton, Jerome Hines, etc. [A minor caveat is the thin and occasionally variable sound, yet this sensitive performance plays most clearly] (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-526. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (OP3392)

    “Last night the music of PELLEAS was most sensitively conducted by Pierre Monteux. The authority, the shimmering orchestral textures that the veteran conductor achieved, the atmosphere that he was able to evoke, made for a first class hearing of one of the rarest and most ephemeral of musical experiences. The fabrics of this luminous orchestral tapestry were the evening's chief delight.

    Theodor Uppman as Pelleas and Jerome Hines as Arkel carried off chief honors among the singers. Mr. Uppman's Pelleas was a wonderful combination of poignant immaturity and instinctive passion and sophistication. He seemed singularly right with his youthful, graceful movements and his touching and ardent delivery of the music.

    Mr. Hines...was a towering figure as the aged Arkel, and his noble voice adorned some of the most beautiful passages of the entire score with a grandiose sonority....

    The Melisande of Nadine Conner was a disappointment. It gave a feeling of being compact, matter-of-fact and efficiently planned, which was fatal to the dream-world atmosphere. There was little of the elusive mystery suggested by Bori and, particularly, by the incomparable Mary Garden. Comparisons can be tiresome, but there are times when it is difficult not to feel them.

    Singher presented a strange Golaud, not nearly so rough or primitive as it should have been. This was an elegant man, constantly conscious of his appearance. Mr. Singher's diction and style were the best of the cast….

    Excellent indeed were the Genevieve of Martha Lipton and the Yniold of little Vilma Georgiou. The latter was the best Yniold in this reviewer's considerable experience with PELLEAS. A word also for Lubomir Vichegonov's nicely drawn physician.

    Perfect performances of PELLEAS are rare, but this is an opera, more than most, where near-perfection is to be ardently desired.”


    - Max de Schauensee, THE PHILADELPHIA EVENING BULLETIN




    “Nadine Conner made her New York debut on Dec. 22, 1941, as Pamina in an English version of Mozart's MAGIC FLUTE, conducted by Bruno Walter. She was hailed for both her vocal promise and her youthful beauty. It was not generally known that she was then about 35. After singing the role of the Forest Bird in SIEGFRIED, she went on to demanding roles in 1943, singing the first of 25 Sophies in DER ROSENKAVALIER. She also sang with the New York Philharmonic beginning in 1942, when she took a solo part in Mahler's Second Symphony, under Walter, who then chose her for annual performances of the Bach ST. MATTHEW PASSION.

    Among her outstanding recordings was one of HANSEL AND GRETEL in 1947, in which she and Risë Stevens sang the title roles. It was the first complete opera recording made in this country, according to the Met archivists.

    In 1951, also under Walter, she sang Marzelline in FIDELIO, in which her voice had to stand up to the heroic sounds of Kirsten Flagstad. She progressed to a memorable Tyrone Guthrie production of CARMEN in 1951 and 1952, and sang Mimi in a new production of LA BOHEME as well. Altogether she gave 249 performances of 15 roles before her last Met performance, in FAUST, on March 12, 1960. THE NEW YORK TIMES said her final performance made ‘an appealing Marguerite’ that showed her vocally in admirable form’. ‘Her farewell performance’, wrote John Briggs, ‘was one of the best of her Metropolitan career’.''


    - Wolfgang Saxon, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 10 March, 2003




    “The American baritone Theodor Uppman, best known for creating the title role in Benjamin Britten's opera BILLY BUDD in 1951, had won high praise in 1947 for a concert performance of Debussy's PELLEAS ET MELISANDE with the San Francisco Symphony, opposite Maggie Teyte as Melisande. The conductor was Pierre Monteux, who became an important mentor to Mr. Uppman. Mr. Uppman repeated the role of Pelleas for his successful 1948 debut with the New York City Opera.

    What came his way was BILLY BUDD. Britten had begun to doubt that he would ever find a suitable baritone to portray the young, winsome and innocent tragic hero of his new opera, based on the Herman Melville story. David Webster, the administrator of the Royal Opera at Covent Garden, which was presenting the premiere, had received a tip about Mr. Uppman. So he invited Mr. Uppman to New York for an audition. ‘At that time’, Mr. Uppman later recalled, ‘I was very blond and curly-haired, and I had been working a good deal of the summer out of doors, rolling great big barrels of oil, my shirt off, and I had a pretty good set of muscles and I was nice and tanned’. Webster was duly impressed with Mr. Uppman's voice and physique. So was Britten, when Mr. Uppman, who looked much younger than his 31 years, flew to London for an audition. ‘Apparently he felt that I was Billy Budd’, Mr. Uppman later recalled. After the opera's premiere at Covent Garden, Mr. Uppman repeated the role for a broadcast on NBC television. His Metropolitan Opera debut followed in 1953; he again sang the role of Pelleas. With his high, lyric yet robust voice, youthful vigor, boyish looks and musical sensitivity, he excelled at the Met in lighter roles, like Mozart's Papageno, Offenbach's Piquillo in LA PERICHOLE and Strauss' Harlequin in ARIADNE AUF NAXOS. He gave almost 400 performances in 15 roles with the company.

    In recent years, the live recording of the world premiere performance of BILLY BUDD, with Britten conducting the forces of Covent Garden, has become available. Mr. Uppman often spoke of how gratified he was that over the years young singers taking on the role had come to him for tips, most recently, the American baritone Nathan Gunn.”


  • -Anthony Tommasini, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 19 March, 2005






  • NADIA BOULANGER & IGOR MARKEVITCH Cond. Lausanne Chamber Orchestra & Chorus; Nadia Boulanger Ensemble Vocal; Masha Predit, Giselle Peyron, Hughes Cuenod, Doda Conrad, Jean Francaix, Jean-Paul Marty, Marcelle de Manziarly & Nadia Boulanger: Tschaikowsky, Mussorgsky, Lili Boulanger, Byrd, Des Pres, Poulenc & Francaix. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1176, Live Performances 1948-57. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1896)

    "Nadia Boulanger's father, Ernest Boulanger, was a respected professor at the Paris Conservatory. Her mother, Raissa Myschetsky, was a Russian princess who had been one of Ernest's students. In 1897, she became a student at the Paris Conservatory, where the renowned Gabriel Faure taught her composition.

    It was Boulanger's younger sister, Lili, who in 1913 became the first woman to win the Prix de Rome. After Lili - whose health had always been fragile - died in 1918, Boulanger deemed her own music 'useless' and stopped composing. Musical instruction became Boulanger's primary focus.

    Boulanger had a profound impact on a large number of musicians and composers, particularly through her work at the American Conservatory in Fontainebleau, France. Though her primary focus was on her students, Boulanger also worked as a conductor. A friend and admirer of Igor Stravinsky, she led the 1938 world premiere of his 'Dumbarton Oaks Concerto' in Washington, D.C.

    As a conductor, Boulanger broke gender barriers in multiple settings. In 1937, she became the first woman to conduct London's Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. In America, Boulanger was the first woman to lead the New York Philharmonic, as well as orchestras in Boston and Philadelphia.

    Boulanger pere instilled in his daughter the assumption that music was a more urgently natural part of life than literature or even sex. Her mother stressed the moral obligation to do better, always better, and dominated Nadia with a Spartan charm. After her husband's death she shared her daughter's bedroom until 1935, when Raissa died, long after Nadia had become a world figure. Through osmosis I knew what the mentor was made of, even to her appearance (thin bow ties, hair in a bun, pince-nez and sensible shoes, the long black dress) [and] her technical proficiency.

    At 10 the girl entered the Paris Conservatory, where for a decade she won first prizes in harmony, counterpoint, fugue, organ and accompagnement (a term covering all aspects of score reading), and studied composition with Gabriel Faure. In 1908 she was granted Second Grand Prix de Rome for her cantata LA SIRENE. (The First Grand Prix came five years later to Nadia's fragile younger sister, Lili, the first woman composer ever to be so honored.

    From 1908 to 1918 Nadia taught harmony at the Conservatory. But not until 1948 would she be named full professor, that position in France being thought unsuited to a woman, even her country's most sought-after pedagogue. Meanwhile, Nadia entertained a very public rapport with Raoul Pugno, a famous and fat pianist old enough to be - and who in a sense was - her father. With Pugno she not only gave concert tours but also composed an opera, never produced, on a libretto by the poet Gabriele D'Annunzio. After the deaths in 1914 of Pugno and in 1918 of Lili, Nadia Boulanger stopped composing to become a full-time teacher and occasional performer.

    When the American Conservatory at Fontainebleau was founded in 1921, Boulanger was its chief draw, which she remained, except for the war years, every summer for the rest of her life. Tours of the United States resulted in her becoming the first woman to conduct the Boston Symphony [C1420], and then the New York Philharmonic.

    Second only to Bach in the Boulanger pantheon came her friend Igor Stravinsky, who habitually supplied his new manuscripts for her perusal. Stravinsky could do no wrong. In the autumn of 1964 I visited her just after her return from Berlin, where she had heard Stravinsky's newest excursion into 12-tone terrain, ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. Asked how long the piece lasted, Mademoiselle Boulanger replied, 'Does one speak of temporal data where Stravinsky is concerned? I later understood: The piece, 13 minutes by the clock, seemed like a numbing hour.

    All her life she was newsworthy even to philistines, enigmatic even to intimates. Boulanger's fame lay in her femaleness, thus in her firstness. She excelled at what no other woman ever had, musical pedagogy at its highest, but she also gave up what no woman ever had, a composing career. Her old-maidish aspect notwithstanding, Boulanger was a creature of high temperament. The open infatuations with old Raoul Pugno, later with young Igor Markevitch, now seem rife with pre-Freudian innocence, as do intimations of latent lesbianism. She visibly preferred men because they were not in competition with her except, that is, with Lili, for beside Lili there was no room for other female composers.

    Nadia Boulanger is mainly remembered as a mentor of composers, although she was the guiding light for every breed of musician, not least of all the female musician, and her public career as organist, conductor, musicologist, lecturer and even for a time newspaper critic was unprecedented. Her years of dedication to teaching - one student, Virgil Thomson, described Boulanger as a 'one-woman graduate school' - provided her with a lasting musical legacy.

    Boulanger also helped spur interest in the music of Claudio Monteverdi, and made sure that pieces written by her sister and by Faure, her former teacher, were not forgotten. Even before the war, as a teen-ager, I had been imbued with her version of Monteverdi's madrigals on the one record which, still today, I would take to a desert island. Listen again to the soprano Countess Jean de Polignac's rendition of 'Amor' among those Monteverdi madrigals."


  • - Ned Rorem, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 23 May, 1982






  • IVRY GITLIS, w.Gerard Devos Cond. ORTF S.O.: Violin Concerto in d (Sibelius); w.Dean Dixon Cond.RTF S.O.: Violin Concerto in D (Tschaikowsky); w.Odette Pignault (Pf.): Violin Concerto in D – Canzonetta (Tschaikowsky); Interview [in French] with Ivry Gitlis. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1185, Live Performances, 1951-64. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0804)

    “The Israeli violinist, very much a musician’s musician, is not so well known to music lovers in general perhaps because he was never signed by a major record label and his art was focused on live music-making. His deeply personal, idiosyncratic interpretations, though, won him numerous admirers, particularly fellow violinists.

    Born in Haifa, Gitlis studied with Mira Ben-Ami before travelling to France, at the suggestion of Bronislaw Huberman who helped to raise funds. In Paris, he studied with Marcel Chailley, and then, at the Paris Conservatoire, with Jules Boucherit. Later, he’d work with Georges Enescu, Jacques Thibaud and Carl Flesch.

    After the war, which he spent in London, he took part in the Long-Thibaud Competition, taking fifth place. A move to the United States followed and he undertook a number of tours, performing under the batons of Eugene Ormandy and George Szell. Later that decade he recorded for Vox, making LPs of the concertos by Berg, Bartok, Bruch, Sibelius, Tchaikovsky, Mendelssohn and Stravinsky. He recorded the violin sonatas by Debussy and Franck with Martha Argerich for CBS in 1978, a recording Gramophone noted for Gitlis’ highly individual approach.

    The 1960s saw concerts in Moscow, Leningrad, Kiev and Odessa, making him the first Israeli violinist to play in the USSR. In 1972 he founded the Festival de Vence as part of his aim to make classical music accessible to all, and he performed with musicians from all genres to break down barriers. He continued to perform into his late eighties, and a number of live recordings were released. To mark Gitlis’ 90th birthday Decca France issued a four-CD collection ‘Ivry Gitlis - The Violin Virtuoso’. Gitlis is the subject of a documentary by Tony Palmer and he was one of the commentators in Bruno Monsaingeon’s classic ‘The Art of Violin' from 2001. He also appeared in a number of films in acting roles.”


  • - THE OBSERVER, 29 December, 2020










    - - - REPEATED FROM THE RECENT PAST - - -








  • NINETEENTH-CENTURY FRENCH BARITONES, Volume 1, incl. Leon Melchissedec, Jean Lassalle, Max Bouvet, and Maurice Renaud. 3-Marston 53024, recorded 1899-1913. Transfers by Ward Marston. Elaborate 63pp profusely illustrated Booklet w.Biographical Notes by Vincent Giroud & Luc Bourrousse, the foreword by Crutchfield. (V2648)





  • HERBERT von KARAJAN Cond. Lucerne Festival Orch.: Coriolan Overture; Symphony #7 in A; w.WOLFGANG SCHNEIDERHAN: Violin Concerto in D (all Beethoven). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-1167, Live Performance, 27 Aug., 1955, Lucerne Festival. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1894)





  • DESIRE-EMILE INGHELBRECHT Cond. RTF S.O.: Night on Bald Mountain; The Destruction of Sennacherib; w.Edith Stockhausen: La chambre d'enfants; w.Madeleine Grancher, Jean Mollien & Bernard Demigny: Khovanshchina - Excerpts; Boris Godunov – Excerpts (all Mussorgsky). [All are most intriguing performances, especially so in these exquisite vocal soloists singing in impeccable French!] (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-1132, Live Performance, 19 Jan., 1965, Theatre des Champs Elysees. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1895)





  • JEAN FOURNIER, w.Ginette Doyen (Pf.): Violin Sonata in D, Op. 12, #1; Violin Sonata in A, Op. 12, #1; Violin Sonata in E-flat, Op. 12, #3; Violin Sonata in a, Op. 23, #4 (all Beethoven). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1193, Broadcast Performance, 1952-54, Paris. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0803)





  • VLADO PERLEMUTER, w.Serge Baudo Cond. RTF S.O.: 'Emperor' Concerto #5 in E-flat (Beethoven), Live Performance, 7 March, 1959; GUY FALLOT, w.Vlado Perlemuter (Pf.): 'Pierrot is angry at the moon' Cello Sonata (Debussy), Broadcast Performance, 1968, Geneva. [The Debussy Sonata is a great piece de resistance!] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1029. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1397)





  • SHURA CHERKASSKY, w. Gunter Herbig Cond. Chicago Orch.:Piano Concerto #2 in G (Tschaikowsky), Live Performance, 13 March, 1988, Orchestra Hall; w.Leonard Slatkin Cond. NYPO: Piano Concerto #4 in D (Rubinstein), Live Performance, 5 March, 1987, Philharmonic Hall, New York. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1145. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1396)





  • YVONNE LEFEBURE, Vol. IV: Great Fantasia and Fugue in g minor, BWV 542 (Bach); Piano Sonata #30 in E, Op.109 (Beethoven); Theme & Variations, Op.73; Nocturne #13, Op.119 (Faure); A delightful and stimulating Interview with Yvonne Lefebure & Guy Erismann [the great champion of contemporary Czech music] - so intense one can imagine her facial expressions! (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1108, Broadcast Performance, 20 April, 1967, Paris. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1395)





  • ARTUR RODZINSKI Cond. RAI S.O., Roma: Concerto Grosso in d (Vivaldi); Symphony #10 in e (Shostakovitch); w.HENRYK SZERYNG: Piano Concerto #2 in c (Szymanowski). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1142, Live Performance, 18 Match, 1955. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1893)





  • Verdi TE DEUM and VERDI REQUIEM, NBC Concert, 27 Jan., 1951; ARTURO TOSCANINI Cond. NBC S.O. & The Robert Shaw Chorale with Herva Nelli, Fedora Barbieri, Giuseppe di Stefano & Cesare Siepi; DRESS REHEARSAL, 25 Jan., 1951, Carnegie Hall, with broadcast commentary by Ben Grauer. (Canada) 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1140. Elaborate 36pp. Brochure features essays by Robert Matthew-Walker, Richard Gardner & Richard Caniell. Transfers by Richard Caniell. (C1892)





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    BOOKS

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    Books have become our lonely stepchildren! By spending so many hours constantly revising our thousands of CDs we realize we have paid scant attention to our BOOKS ON SALE, thus many have been added (with more appearing), accompanied by greatly reduced prices! Have a glance at our SALE section - for BOOKS!



    -----------------------------------------


    . . . numerous out-of-print CDs and LPs,

    [many sealed copies of numerous out-of-print

    additions: The Record Collector, Naxos, VRCS,

    Issues of Symposium's Harold Wayne series,

    Romophone, GOP & many Met Opera

    broadcasts & operas from Moscow’s Aquarius, plus

    numerous lesser-known operas have been added

    throughout our listings, in appropriate categories . . .

    out-of-print books [many biographies,

    Record Catalogue-Discographies . . .

    numerous CDs are added each week] . . .





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    COLLECTOR ALERT ! ! !



    Norbeck, Peters & Ford's Auction #151 has Closed. We want to take this opportunity to thank everyone for participating in Auction #151.

    Auction #151 now closed Saturday, 30 November 2019.

    We invite you to review our Auction #151. It is comprised of Vocal, Victor 'GEMS', Light Opera, and Spoken Word Records.

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    Enjoy perusing!



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  • Lucrezia Bori Tribute;  Mario Chamlee, Richard Crooks,  Tito Schipa, Joseph Bentonelli, Leon Rothier  (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1136)
    V2650. LUCREZIA BORI: A Tribute, incl. LA RONDINE - Act 2, with Mario Chamlee, Live Performance, 8 Oct., 1934 St. Louis Opera, Live Performance, (not Chicago nor San Francisco [as erroneously assumed in the past]); LA BOHÈME - Act 4, final scene, w.Carlo Sabajno, Cond. La Scala Ensemble; Tito Schipa, Ernesto Badini, Luigi Manfrini, Aristide Baracchi & Thea Vitulli, recorded 1925; Act 1, final scene, w.Otto Klemperer, Cond. Los Angeles Phil., & Joseph Bentonelli – Live Performance, 6 June, 1937; MANON – Act 3, scene 2, w.Louis Hasselmans Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Richard Crooks & Léon Rothier – Live Performance, 29 March, 1936 (Bori's Met Farewell), including Lucrezia Bori’s speech; L’ENFANT PRODIGUE - Azaël! Azaël! Pourquoi m'as-tu quittée?, w.Goossens Cond. Met Opera Orch., Live Performance, 30 Dec., 1934; Arias from La Bohème, Madama Butterfly, Louise, La Fille du Régiment, Pagliacci, Mignon & La Rondine – recorded 1925-35. (Canada) 2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1136. Restoration and Transfers by Richard Caniell. Notes by Richard Caniell & William Russell. With elaborate 46pp booklet. - 787790582083
    $39.95
    Pelleas et Melisande (Monteux;  Nadine Conner, Theodore Uppman, Martial Singher, Martha Lipton, Jerome Hines)   (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-526)
    OP3392. PELLÉAS ET MÉLISANDE, Live Performance, 2 Jan., 1954, w.Monteux Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Nadine Conner, Theodore Uppman, Martial Singher, Martha Lipton, Jerome Hines, etc. [A minor caveat is the thin and occasionally variable sound, yet this sensitive performance plays most clearly] (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-526. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $39.95
    Nadia Boulanger, Vol. II;  Igor Markevitch;  Masha Predit, Giselle Peyron, Hughes Cuenod, Doda Conrad, Jean Francaix (St Laurent Studio YSL T-1176)
    $19.90
    Ivry  Gitlis;  Gerard Devos;  Dean Dixon;  Odette Pigault   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-1185)
    S0804. IVRY GITLIS, w.Gérard Devos Cond. ORTF S.O.: Violin Concerto in d (Sibelius); w.Dean Dixon Cond.RTF S.O.: Violin Concerto in D (Tschaikowsky); w.Odette Pignault (Pf.): Violin Concerto in D - Canzonetta (Tschaikowsky); Interview [in French] with Ivry Gitlis. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1185, Live Performances, 1951-64. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $19.90