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Since 1972

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The CORELLI & MILANOV surprise has arrived –

the 1962 non-broadcast Met

ANDREA CHENIER . . .

DANIEL ERLIH . . .

PIERRE FOURNIER . . .

EDUARD van BEINUM . . .

many more titles on ‘sale’



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  • ANDREA CHENIER, Live Performance, 17 Nov., 1962 , w.Cleva Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Franco Corelli, Zinka Milanov, Anselmo Colzani, Mignon Dunn, Lili Chookasian, Norman Scott, etc. (Canada) 2-Yves St Laurent T-1024. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. [This performance is the only ANDREA CHENIER Milanov and Corelli ever sang together; a PROMPTER'S BOX recording, thus the remarkable clarity! It's easy to determine where the recording was made - the prompter is lightly heard throughout, and the sound from the audience is rather distant since the microphone was facing the stage!] (OP3347)

    “This is a first-ever release of a recording that claims to have been made in the prompter’s box during a Met performance of ANDREA CHENIER in 1962. It captures the voices very clearly, and the orchestra decently enough, though with a moderate degree of distance and muddiness. The prompter is audible, but frankly far less so than I had expected. I never found it distracting.

    The chief interest here is yet another live Franco Corelli Chenier, and this one from his second season at the Met capturing his voice in prime condition. For many opera lovers the choice recording of this opera is the live 1960 Vienna performance where Corelli shares the stage with Renata Tebaldi and Ettore Bastianini, and where the conductor is the brilliant Lovro von Matacic (Orfeo 682 062). This should not be thought of as a replacement for that version but a supplement. It features a rare pairing of Corelli with one of the superstars of an earlier generation, Zinka Milanov.

    Chenier is one of those roles that seems almost to be composed with a singer like Corelli in mind. He is glorious here, holding on to high notes, sometimes even building intensity during their duration, showing an innate feel for the shape of Giordano’s phrases. He also demonstrates a great deal of sensitivity in the form of dynamic shading, using the full range between pianissimo and fortissimo. This is grand opera singing at its grandest. Giordano gives the tenor four arias (if you count ‘Credi al destino’) and two big duets, and there is more juicy writing in between. Hearing Corelli peal forth at ‘Credi al ‘amor; Chenier, tu se amato’ is to experience an immense thrill. I would not claim this performance to be superior to the Vienna one, but it is different enough in some details to be newly rewarding. He seems more willing to hold on to high notes here (or perhaps Cleva gave him greater freedom than Matacic). Some might object to holding on for so long, but I find it wildly exciting. (Both performances are, however, greatly preferable to his earthbound EMI studio recording.)

    By 1961 Milanov was approaching the end of a long and distinguished career as a Met prima donna. There are many moments that recall the glory of her large, darkly colored dramatic soprano. Her phrasing in the duets and in her big aria, ‘La mamma morta’, is utterly idiomatic. As you listen, you know you are hearing a voice of importance, one with a distinctive color that immediately identifies the singer. Less happily, it is also a voice showing signs of age. Many of the top notes are harsh, and some are cut short. There is, however, much compensation. In the opera’s final scene, Milanov and Corelli simply pour out electrifying torrents of sound. As rare as it is to hear the two singers together, they are heard to even greater advantage on a 1957 Covent Garden TOSCA [OP1343 & OP0214].

    Baritone Anselmo Colzani joined the Met in 1960 after the sudden death of Leonard Warren, and he remained one of the company’s leading baritones through 1978. Although he never achieved true stardom, Colzani was a fine artist who always added value to whatever performance he appeared in. His was not a voice of unique power or richness, but his Gerard is sung with a warm tone evenly produced throughout its range and a clear feeling for the drama. The ovation he receives after ‘Nemico della patria’ demonstrates the admiration Met audiences had for him.

    As Madelon, the blind old lady who gives her grandson to the revolution, Lili Chookasian gives an extremely moving and beautifully sung rendition of her lovely little aria. The other smaller roles are well taken, and Fausto Cleva provides knowing, idiomatic conducting without reaching the levels of unique intensity that Matacic achieved in that Vienna performance noted above.

    Clearly, this cannot be recommended as anyone’s first choice for ANDREA CHENIER. But for those who love the opera and Corelli, as well as those of us for whom Zinka Milanov was a special treasure, this release has real value. As noted above, considering its source the sound quality is very listenable, providing a realistic reproduction of the voices and with the orchestra much in the background. No libretto or plot synopsis is included."


    - Henry Fogel, FANFARE, 2020




    “That grand but variable soprano Zinka Milanov returned to the Metropolitan Opera on Saturday afternoon at her grandest. She sang Maddalena in ANDREA CHENIER and the best adjective to describe her performance is sublime.

    One found it difficult, in hearing the wealth of youthful tone she produced during the afternoon, to believe that Miss Milanov will celebrate the 25th anniversary of her Met debut next month. Her singing was luminous, beautifully shaded, and under perfect control, over the full dynamic range. Of her acting less can be said, but one must not be greedy.

    Anselmo Colzani sang his first Gerard with the Company, adding another strong and believable characterization to his splendid record at the Met….

    It was, all told, a splendid performance to which everyone contributed his best. But it was clear from Miss Milanov’s first notes that the afternoon belonged to her.”


    - Alan Rich, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 18 Nov., 1962




    "Even when the gloss is off the fabric of her tone, it retains a measure of succulence quite individual and reassuring. Now, when the opulence is diminished but the style remains majestic, the phrasing can sometimes seem a bit ostentatious, since its grand expanse is not filled to the fullest with comparably sumptuous tone.

    Everything about her performance on this afternoon reveals the diligence of the dedicated artist. We, who are in her debt, can [joyfully] applaud her success on this afternoon."


  • - Paul Jackson, SIGN-OFF FOR THE OLD MET, pp.492-494






  • DEVY ERLIH, w.Bernard Ringeissen (Pf.): Webern, Bartok & Mozart (the latter's Sonata in G-flat, K.454), Live Performance, 7 Feb., 1966; w.Manuel Rosenthal Cond. RTF National Orch.: Symphonie espagnole (Lalo), Live Performance, 10 May, 1956. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-997. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0765)

    “Devy Erlih was born in Paris on 5 November 1928. His Romanian-Jewish parents were immigrants from what is now Moldova. His father was a folk musician, playing the cimbalom and the pan pipes. Before he was ten, Erlih was the star attraction in his father’s cafe orchestra, performing nightly in a brasserie. His father had no formal musical training and, at first, neither did Devy. ‘My father just played because in those surroundings that was what people did. I performed with him for years, and I loved it - it was full of fun. My father taught me, and only by ear’.

    That, he adds, was an advantage: ‘It was a wonderful beginning, not to start with solfege - how can a child be stimulated by a horrid burden like that? One day, a music-loving philanthropist missed a train and wandered into the brasserie where the Erlih family orchestra was in full flow. ‘This gentleman saw the poster outside billing me as ‘Le petit Devy’ and came in to listen. ‘Le petit Devy’ learnt the Mendelssohn Concerto, gave the concert, then went straight back to the cafe orchestra. But the seeds of an idea had been planted, and a few months later his father took him to visit one of the Paris Conservatoire’s leading violin professors, Jules Boucherit - among whose pupils were Ginette Neveu, Henri Temianka and Michele Auclair. ‘He said that he would gladly take me, but that I would have to stop the cafe music and concentrate on violin studies’, says Erlih. Boucherit, he adds, had the reputation of being a dictator. ‘It was that particular generation. In those days, the father figure was a dictator. You did what he demanded, without questioning. Boucherit was a dictator - which didn’t stop him from saving my life’.

    After the German invasion, the Erlih family was in grave danger. In hiding, and hence unable to work, the Erlihs found it impossible to support their young son and sought a better way of providing for him. Through Boucherit they met one Mr Ferretti, an Italian who was a long-time resident in Paris. He took Devy in. Boucherit took Erlih out of the city to his country house, where the boy stayed with the caretaker. ‘The very next Sunday the Gestapo came to Ferretti’s home, looking for ‘the little Jew’ who played the violin. They knew all about me.’ After the war, Erlih resumed his official studies at once, entering Boucherit’s class in the Paris Conservatoire and soon earning the sought-after Premier Prix. This enabled him to give his first recital. ‘The critic Antoine Golea, who was Romanian and had formerly been a violin student of Enescu, turned up by mistake. Golea’s review lauded the youngster to the skies; the critic also recommended him to a conductor friend, Henri Tomasi, who gave Erlih the opportunity to play the Brahms Concerto with his orchestra. These events helped to launch his career, and in 1955 he won the Long-Thibaud Competition - the last French violinist to do so. Ironically, Erlih had encountered Jacques Thibaud himself several times. ‘He was like a brother to Boucherit and whenever he came round Boucherit would say, ‘Listen to this little boy’. Each time Thibaud just patted me on the shoulder and said ‘Very good, very good, now continue, mon petit’, and these were his lessons! I was lucky enough to hear him in what proved to be one of his last concerts - he played the Brahms Concerto, rather surprisingly - and I was very struck by the spiritual quality of his playing then’.

    Henri Tomasi was among the first composers who wrote for Erlih. ‘Bruno Maderna didn’t write his concerto for me, but I gave the premiere; it’s a fantastic, an astonishing piece. I also gave the world premiere of Milhaud’s Second Concerto. Then Martinu came to hear me in New York and gave me his concerto, asking whether I could play it in France, which I did.’ Erlih gave the Japanese premiere of Dutilleux’s violin concerto ‘L’arbre des songes’ in 1989, standing in for an indisposed soloist at just three days’ notice. Andre Jolivet loomed especially large in Erlih’s life; he frequently performed the composer’s 1972 Violin Concerto and ‘Suite rhapsodique’. ‘Jolivet was a massive person, rather severe and reserved, but he gave you the impression of an immense solidity of character’, recalls Erlih. ‘I was terribly impressed by the style of his music which I felt very strongly, and the accuracy of writing that he had to express this. The language was not traditional at all; it was very personal, but with a permanent need of expression, and that to me is what says the most’. After the composer’s death, the link went even deeper: Erlih married Jolivet’s daughter, Christine. At a time when France was extremely conservative and did not like the avant-garde, Devy was a pioneer. ‘The greater the complexity of the music, the more your technique has to evolve. Then what remains, no matter what you play, is the question of translating what you think is true’.”


  • - Jessica Duchen, THE STRAD, Feb., 2012






  • PIERRE FOURNIER, w.Naum Walter (Pf.): Suite #6 in D (Bach); Sonata #4 in C (Beethoven); Sonata in A (Franck); Variations on a Rococo Theme (Tschaikowsky). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-887. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0766)

    “Pierre Leon Marie Fournier was admitted to the Paris Conservatoire where his teachers there were Paul Bazelaire and Anton Hekking; he graduated in 1924 at the age of 17. Fournier made his debut the year after his graduation. This was a solo appearance with the Concerts Colonne Orchestra, which received favorable notices. The almost invariable comment in reviews was the perfection of his bowing technique. He began a successful career as a touring concert artist and as a performer in chamber music concerts, gaining a great reputation in Europe. In 1937 to 1939, he was the director of cello studies at the Ecole Normal . It was often said that he became a friendly rival with his contemporary, cellist Paul Tortelier. He prescribed the Sevcik violin bowing studies for his cello students.

    In 1941, he became a member of the faculty at the Paris Conservatoire, but during the war years his concert touring career was impossible. Once the war was over, though, he was able to resume and he rapidly increased in fame and international stature. His old audience found that he had grown in artistic depth. Hungarian violinist Joseph Szigeti, meeting Fournier in rehearsals for a 1947 Edinburgh Festival appearance, had not heard him for over ten years and wrote that he was ‘tremendously impressed by the Apollonian beauty and poise that his playing had acquired in the intervening years’. Szigeti, Fournier, violist William Primrose, and pianist Artur Schnabel formed a piano quartet in those years and gave some fabled concerts at which they played virtually all of Schubert's and Brahms' piano chamber music.

    Fournier made his first U.S. tour in 1948. His chamber music partner Artur Schnabel spread the word among cellists, other musicians, and critics that they were to be visited by a great new cellist. The New York and Boston critics were ecstatic. He had to give up his Conservatoire post because of his expanding concert career; he appeared in Moscow for the first time in 1959. Commentator Lev Grinberg wrote that he was notable for a romantic interpretation, clarity of form, vivid phrasing and clean, broad bowing - all ‘aimed at revealing the content’.

    He had a broad repertoire, including Bach, Boccherini, the Romantics, Debussy, Hindemith, and Prokofiev. Composers Martinu, Martinon, Martin, Roussel, and Poulenc all wrote works for him. He had a standing Friday night date to privately play chamber music with Alfred Cortot, at which they might be visited by musicians like Jacques Thibaud. In 1953, he became a Chevalier of the Legion of Honor and was promoted to officer in 1963. In 1972, he retired to Switzerland and gave master classes. He still gave concerts, even as late as 1984 when he was 78.”


  • - Joseph Stevenson, allmusic.com






  • EDUARD van BEINUM Cond. Concertgebouw Orch.: Symphony #7 in E (Bruckner); Serenade for Strings – Waltz (Tschaikowsky). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL 78-1009, recorded 1947. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1784)

    "Van Beinum's talents as a pianist brought him to the Concertgebouw Amsterdam in 1927, and he made his debut as a guest conductor there in 1929. In 1931 he was named to the post of assistant to chief conductor Willem Mengelberg. In 1938 Eduard van Beinum was promoted to joint leadership of the Concertgebouw alongside Mengelberg, but did not take full control of the orchestra until 1945 when Mengelberg was suspended from his post and exiled after being declared a Nazi collaborator.

    Musicians responded strongly to Beinum's leadership - he represented the antithesis of Mengelberg's autocratic manner. Beinum preferred to work with an orchestra in a collaborative sense, and his evenhanded approach was what the Concertgebouw needed in the postwar period when tensions were running high. In 1949 Beinum was named principal conductor of the London Philharmonic, premiering several works of Benjamin Britten and encouraging the efforts of aspiring composer Malcolm Arnold. Beinum took the Concertgebouw on a successful tour of the United States in 1956, dividing the conducting duties with Rafael Kubelik. Beinum also accepted the job of musical director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic beginning in 1956.

    Beinum's full-fledged recording career did not get underway until Telefunken recorded him with the Concertgebouw in November 1941. Beinum made up for lost time quickly at war's end, recording frequently and well for the English Decca and Philips labels, primarily with the Concertgebouw Amsterdam and the London Philharmonic. His recorded output is well invested in Romantic literature, and his interpretations of Beethoven's DIE GESCHOPFE DES PROMETHEUS and Bruckner's Symphony #7 [above] are justly famous. But Beinum was also greatly interested in the contemporary music of his time, making many first recordings of works by Pijper, Diepenbrock, Badings, and Hendrik Andriessen, in addition to those of Bartok, Britten, and Stravinsky."


  • - Uncle Dave Lewis, allmusic.com








    . . . FROM THE RECENT PAST . . .

    REPEATED








  • VANESSA (Samuel Barber), Live Performance, 1 Feb., 1958, w.Mitropoulos Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Eleanor Steber, Rosalind Elias, Regina Resnik, Nicolai Gedda, Giorgio Tozzi, etc. (All-CREATOR cast, 15 January, 1958, Metropolitan Opera House – including the infamous ‘Skating Aria’ in VANESSA that Barber removed it from the score after the Met Opera production, so convinced was he that no one else could sing it). (Canada) 2-Yves St Laurent T-957. (OP3348)





  • FALSTAFF, Live Performance, 26 Feb., 1949, w.Reiner Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Leonard Warren, Giuseppe Valdengo, Giuseppe di Stefano, Cloe Elmo, Regina Resnik, Licia Albanese, Alessio de Paolis, Lorenzo Alvary, Leslie Chabay & Ludwig Burgstaller. 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-944 (OP3346)





  • DON CARLOS, Live Performance, 15 April, 1961, w.Verchi Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Franco Corelli, Mary Curtis-Verna, Mario Sereni, Jerome Hines, Hermann Uhde, Irene Dalis, Martina Arroyo, etc. [Truly humbling to realize how we simply took for granted performances of this grandeur some 60 years ago! Corelli is at his glorious peak in this performance, with the under-rated Curtis-Verna, Dalis, Sereni & Hines equally in his league - all captured in glorious, opulent sound in the warm acoustic of the venerated Old House!] (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-973. (OP3345)





  • RAYMOND LEWENTHAL: Bach, Alkan, Saint-Saens, Moszkowski, Dohnanyi & Chopin (incl. the latter's Sonata #3 in B). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-982, Live Performance, 22 Sept., 1964, Town Hall, New York. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1341)





  • CHARLES MUNCH Cond. Boston S.O.: Daphnis et Chloe - Live Performance, 28 July, 1961, Tanglewood Festival; Ma Mere l'Oye - Live Performance, 1 Feb., 1958, Symphony Hall (both Ravel). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-939. [Live performances, 'Ma Mere l'Oye' brilliantly displaying the splendor of the Symphony Hall acoustic - the diaphanous sound captured in 'Daphnis et Chloe' is even superior; another most treasurable pair of Munch broadcasts!] Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1783)





  • WILLIAM STEINBERG Cond. Boston Symphony Orchestra: All-Wagner Program. (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-942, Live Performance, 11, 12 & 15 Jan., 1974, Symphony Hall, Boston. [This glorious live performance beautifully displays the splendor of the Symphony Hall acoustic.] Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1782)





  • ERNANI, Live Performance, 10 April, 1965, w.Schippers Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Leontyne Price, Franco Corelli, Mario Sereni, etc., replete with Milton Cross' commentaries; LEONTYNE PRICE, w. Gamson Cond. American Opera Orch.: Giulio Cesare - Excerpts, Live Performance, 10 Oct., 1958; LEONTYNE PRICE, w. Rizchin Cond. French Radio-TV Orch.: Arias from Nozze, Ernani, L'Africaine, Suor Angelica, La Rondine, Tosca, Adriana Lecouvreur & Antony and Cleopatra - Live Performance, 15 Feb., 1968, Paris; w. Peter Herman Adler Cond. BBC S.O.: All Strauss Concert, with commentary, 26 July, 1959; LEONTYNE PRICE, w. Samuel Barber (Pf.): Four Barber Songs (Acc. by the Composer), with commentary, 30 Oct., 1953; LEONTYNE PRICE interviewed by William Wells, 6 April, 1960. 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1123, w.Elaborate 46pp Booklet. Transfers by Richard Caniell. Notes by William Russell & Richard Caniell. (OP3341)





  • LOHENGRIN, Live Performance, 19 Feb., 1938 (replete with Milton Cross’ commentaries) w. de Abravanel Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Lauritz Melchior, Kirsten Flagstad, Karin Branzell, Julius Huehn, Ludwig Hofmann, etc.; LOHENGRIN - Act I Excerpts, Live Performance, 11 Nov., 1938, Chicago Opera, w. McArthur Cond. Kirsten Flagstad & Rene Maison. (Canada) 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1075, w. Elaborate 55pp Booklet. Notes by Richard Caniell. Restoration & transfers by Richard Caniell. (OP3343)





  • SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY Cond. Boston S.O.: American Festival Overture (William Schuman); Symphony #3 (Piston), Live Performance, 31 Dec., 1948; Rehearsals for Symphony #7 in C (Sibelius) [the latter featuring Koussevitzky's singing along with the Sibelius 7th, his extensive address to and cajoling the orchestra, with broadcast commentary by Olin Downes], 13 Dec., 1948. [Piston was awarded the 1947 Pulitzer Prize in Music Composition for the Third Symphony] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL 78-869, all Symphony Hall. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1776)





  • JEANNE GAUTIER, w. Lelia Gousseau (Pf.): Six Violin Sonatas; LELIA GOUSSEAU, w.Jeanne Gautier (Violin): Piano Sonata in B-flat, K.570 - Broadcast Performances, 1953; JEANNE GAUTIER, w. Lazare-Levy (Pf.): Violin Sonatas K.304 & 306 - Broadcast Performance, 5 Feb., 1956 (all Mozart). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-971. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0764)





  • KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD - 125th Birthday Tribute: Beethoven - Missa Solemnis (First three movements) w.Flagstad, Jagel, Meisle and Pinza, 1937, w. Goossens Cond. Cincinnati Festival Chorus & S.O; Beethoven - 'Ah, Perfido': two performances. Songs and Lieder: Schubert, Wagner, Grieg, Kvandal, Dorumsgaard & Kielland. Arias from Wagnerian operas. Flagstad Farewell speech after Dido and Aeneas (1953). (Canada) 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1119 (3 discs for the price of 2) Program Notes by Dewey Faulkner; Transfers & Recording Notes by Richard Caniell w.34pp. booklet. (V2621)





  • VOCAL RECORD COLLECTORS' SOCIETY - 2018 Issue: Tiit Kuusik, Joachim Tartakov, Hipolito Lazaro & Riccardo Stracciari, Louis Orliac, Miguel Villabella, Charles Rousseliere, Graziella Valle, Linda Cannetti, Giuseppe Danise, Irene Eden, Constance Drever, Frances Alda, Maria Brian, Leon Rains, Karl Jorn, Thomas Burke, Jeanne Gordon, Hulda Lashanska, Hans Reinmar, Elisabeth Grummer & Eileen Farrell. VRCS-2018, recorded 1901-56. Transfers by Seth B. Winner. (V2623)





  • MET SINGERS' ROUNDTABLE, Vol. VI, incl. Edward Downes interviews Regine Crespin, Geraint Evans, Marilyn Horne & James McCracken, 11 March, 1972; Edward Downes interviews Zinka Milanov, Richard Tucker & Robert Merrill, 6 Jan., 1973; William Weaver & Herbert Handt discuss five generations of Puccinis in Lucca, 15 Feb., 1969. [In professional sound, the ideal gift for any opera lover who already has everything! These mementi are irresistible components to any aficionado's collection!] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-999. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (V2627)





  • MET SINGERS' ROUNDTABLE, Vol. V, incl. Edward Downes interviews John Alexander, Geraint Evans, Regine Crespin & Grace Bumbry, 8 March, 1969; Cyril Ritchard interviews Ezio Flagello, Birgit Nilsson, Jess Thomas & William Walker, 1 Jan., 1972; Lloyd Moss interviews Pierre Boulez, 16 April, 1969; Wilhelm Furtwangler speaks about conducting, 1948. [In professional sound, the ideal gift for any opera lover who already has everything! These mementi are irresistible components to any aficionado's collection!] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-996. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (V2626)





  • MET SINGERS' ROUNDTABLE, Vol. IV, incl. Robert Gutman interviews Lotte Lehmann, Christa Ludwig & Leonie Rysanek, 5 Feb., 1969; George Jellinek interviews Lauritz Melchior (on Melchior's birthday), 20 March, 1969. [In professional sound, the ideal gift for any opera lover who already has everything! These mementi are irresistible components to any aficionado's collection!] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-994. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (V2625)





  • MET SINGERS' ROUNDTABLE, Vol. III, incl. Cyril Ritchard interviews Martina Arroyo, Ezio Flagello, James McCracken & Birgit Nilsson, 20 Feb., 1971; Robert Gutman interviews Maria Jeritza & Lotte Lehmann, 2 Feb., 1963; Francis Robinson discusses Marjorie Lawrence, 1 Jan., 1972. [In professional sound, the ideal gift for any opera lover who already has everything! These mementi are irresistible components to any aficionado's collection!] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-991. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (V2622)





  • MET SINGERS' ROUNDTABLE, Vol. II, incl. Edward Downes interviews John Alexander, Martina Arroyo, Donald Gramm & Sherrill Milnes, 29 Feb., 1972; John Charles Miller interviews Eileen Farrell, 23 Feb., 1969; John Charles Miller interviews Beverly Sills, 21 Nov., 1971; Francis Robinson discusses Olive Fremstad, 15 March, 1969; Robert Lawrence discusses instruments of the orchestra with Richard Nass, with Judith Raskin soloist. [In professional sound, the ideal gift for any opera lover who already has everything! These mementi are irresistible components to any aficionado's collection!] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-988. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (V2624)





  • MET SINGERS' ROUNDTABLE, Vol. I, incl. Martina Arroyo, Marilyn Horne & Joan Sutherland, 5 Dec., 1970; Robert Gutman interviews Mary Garden, 1954; Francis Robinson discusses Mary Garden, 4 Feb., 1967; Milton Cross & Deems Taylor interview Dorothee Manski, 25 Dec., 1971; Johnny Carson interviews Martina Arroyo, 1967. [In professional sound, the ideal gift for any opera lover who already has everything! These mementi are irresistible components to any aficionado's collection!] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-987. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (V2620)







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    BOOKS ON SALE



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    “Books have become our lonely stepchildren! By spending so many hours constantly revising our thousands of CDs we realize we have paid scant attention to our BOOKS ON SALE, thus many have been added (with more appearing), accompanied by greatly reduced prices! Have a glance at our SALE section - for BOOKS!



    -----------------------------------------


    . . . numerous out-of-print CDs and LPs,

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    Issues of Symposium's Harold Wayne series,

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    numerous lesser-known operas have been added

    throughout our listings, in appropriate categories . . .

    out-of-print books [many biographies,

    Record Catalogue-Discographies . . .

    numerous CDs are added each week] . . .





    ---------------------------------------------------




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  • Andrea Chenier - non-broadcast 1962 (Cleva;  Franco Corelli, Zinka Milanov, Anselmo Colzani)   (2-Yves St Laurent T-1024)
    OP3347. ANDREA CHENIER, Live Performance, 17 Nov., 1962 , w.Cleva Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Franco Corelli, Zinka Milanov, Anselmo Colzani, Mignon Dunn, Lili Chookasian, Norman Scott, etc. (Canada) 2-Yves St Laurent T-1024. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. [This performance is the only ANDREA CHÉNIER Milanov and Corelli ever sang together; a PROMPTER'S BOX recording, thus the remarkable clarity! It's easy to determine where the recording was made - the prompter is lightly heard throughout, and the sound from the audience is rather distant since the microphone was facing the stage!]
    $39.95
    Devy Erlih;  Manuel Rosenthal;   Bernard Ringeissen   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-997)
    S0765. DEVY ERLIH, w.Bernard Ringeissen (Pf.): Webern, Bartok & Mozart (the latter's Sonata in G-flat, K.454), Live Performance, 7 Feb., 1966; w.Manuel Rosenthal Cond. RTF National Orch.: Symphonie espagnole (Lalo), Live Performance, 10 May, 1956. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-997. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $19.90
    Pierre Fournier;  Naum Walter   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-887)
    S0766. PIERRE FOURNIER, w.Naum Walter (Pf.): Suite #6 in D (Bach); Sonata #4 in C (Beethoven); Sonata in A (Franck); Variations on a Rococo Theme (Tschaikowsky). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-887. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $19.90
    Eduard van Beinum - Concertgebouw - Bruckner  (St Laurent Studio YSL 78-1009)
    C1784. EDUARD van BEINUM Cond. Concertgebouw Orch.: Symphony #7 in E (Bruckner); Serenade for Strings - Waltz (Tschaikowsky). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL 78-1009, recorded 1947. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $19.90