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Historical Reissue Classical CDs, LPs, 78s,
Related Books & Ephemera
Since 1972



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Immortal Performances 4-CD Tribute to

LAURITZ MELCHIOR . . .

Emmons’ definitive LAURITZ MELCHIOR Biography . . .

Yves St Laurent presents a sublime chamber evening with

JEAN-MARIE DARRE, JACQUES FEVRIER,

MENUHIN, GENDRON & PASQUIER . . .

ANNIE FISCHER, Vol. IX . . .

numerous ‘SALE’ items are offered



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  • LAURITZ MELCHIOR: A Tribute, incl. DIE WALKURE - Act 2, w.Edwin McArthur Cond. San Francisco Opera Ensemble; Kirsten Flagstad (Brunnhilde); Marjorie Lawrence (Sieglinde); Herta Glaz (Fricka); Lauritz Melchior (Siegmund); Fred Destal (Wotan), San Francisco War Memorial Opera House 10/24/1939; DIE WALKURE - Act 1; Act 2, Scene 3, w.Fritz Stiedry Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Rose Bampton (Sieglinde); Helen Traubel (Brunnhilde); Lauritz Melchior (Siegmund); Mihaly Szekely (Hunding), Metropolitan Opera, 1/24/1948; TRISTAN - Act 2, w. Fritz Busch Cond.Met Opera Ensemble; Helen Traubel (Isolde); Blanche Thebom (Brangane); Lauritz Melchior (Tristan); Mihaly Szekely (King Marke), Metropolitan Opera, 1/3/1948; Aida - Judgment Scene (with Margarethe Arndt-Ober); Otello - Esultate! Dio mi potevi (2 recordings); Niun mi tema; Tosca: Recondita armonia; Mattinata (Leoncavallo); Pagliacci - Vesti la giubba (2 recordings); Zueignung; Heimliche Aufforderung (both Strauss); Standchen (Schubert); Hrorer du! (Severre Jordan); Ich liebe dich (Grieg); Der fliegende Hollander - Mit Gewitter und Sturm; Die Meistersinger: Preislied. (2 recordings); Die Walkure - Wintersturme; Lohengrin - In fernem Land; Mein lieber Schwan; PARSIFAL - Nur eine Waffe taugt! (2 recordings); Siegfried - Nothung!; Wesendonck-Lieder – Traume; Interview with Melchior. (Canada) 4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1139. Restoration and Transfers by Richard Caniell. Notes by Richard Caniell & Dewey Faulkner. This remarkable set features two elaborate 48pp and 56pp brochures. (V2646)

    "The Immortal Performances label is justly acclaimed for its superb (and sometimes miraculous) sonic restorations of vintage recordings originally, both in-performance, and studio. But an aspect of their work that perhaps receives less attention and appreciation is the care they take to present an in-depth and rounded portrait of featured artists. A new 4-disc tribute to the iconic Danish tenor Lauritz Melchior (1890-1973) is a case in point. There are many outstanding aspects of Melchior’s artistic legacy. First and foremost, he was the greatest Wagnerian tenor of his era, and perhaps of any era. For three decades, Melchior triumphed in the fiercely demanding Wagner Heldentenor roles, lavishing upon them a voice unrivalled for its combination of power, beauty, freedom in the upper register, and marathon-worthy stamina. Such a voice would by itself have assured Melchior’s unrivaled status. But Melchior was also a probing and insightful vocal actor, one who constantly sought to portray the essence of his characters, and to improve upon his interpretations. In that quest, Melchior proved himself a master of phrasing, legato, precise diction, and a wide range of dynamics. Melchior was also able to maintain his voice and artistry over an extraordinary span of years, especially in light of the punishing repertoire he sang. Melchior was a month shy of his 60th birthday when, on February 2, 1950 at the Metropolitan Opera, he sang his final staged opera performance, in the title role of Wagner’s LOHENGRIN. But for several more years, Melchior continued to vocalize in splendid fashion, in stage and radio concerts, and in feature films. For all of Melchior’s triumphs, there were frustrations as well. Although Melchior excelled in such non-Wagnerian roles as Verdi’s Otello, and Radames in the Italian composer’s AIDA, the Met’s Edward Johnson never allowed Melchior to sing such operas on NY’s premiere lyric stage. Recorded excerpts by Melchior from such works are a bittersweet reminder of what a loss this was both to Met audiences, and to the tenor as well. In this IP four-disc tribute, all of these aspects of Melchior’s craft and artistry are masterfully woven throughout, resulting in a set that is of priceless value.

    Of primary interest to Melchior collectors will be portions of three performances of Wagner operas, all available for the first time via this IP release. Each of these performances finds Melchior in superb vocal and dramatic form, and in the company of colleagues with whom he had tremendous chemistry….The sound for all three broadcasts is quite fine…. Of particular interest are excerpts from Italian operas that Melchior never performed at the Met, including AIDA, PAGLIACCI and OTELLO….Another treasure is the inclusion of 20-plus minutes of an interview with Melchior. The tenor is charming, self-effacing, and immensely appreciative of his colleagues. That said, Melchior makes no secret of how shabbily Met’s Rudolf Bing treated him while precipitating the tenor’s departure from the Met, after a career of a quarter century and 500 performances. This travesty, along with the missteps of Bing’s predecessor, Edward Johnson, are meticulously documented and ruthlessly (but appropriately) excoriated by Richard Caniell in an extensive article included in one of the set’s booklets. Dewey Faulkner’s liner notes on Melchior’s career and the featured performances make for lively and thought-provoking reading. Artist bios and photos, and plot synopses, round out the printed material. This is a masterful tribute that excels on all counts. I certainly can’t think of a more worthy recipient than Lauritz Melchior. Highest recommendation.”


    - Ken Meltzer, FANFARE, Nov. / Dec., 2020




    “There are a number of opera singers who deserve the adjective ‘great’. Each of them brings to their public something unique. I can think of only one, however, whose level of performance is so far above and beyond his colleagues that he occupies his own level in the vocal hierarchy: Lauritz Melchior could sing tenderly, with a melting legato line that could spin off into a haunting pianissimo as in the second act TRISTAN duet. His consonants were crisp, and every word he sang is clear. Year after year he sang the heaviest of Wagnerian roles with little diminution of authority’….

    The singing on this set is extraordinary for its consistency of quality over a span of time beginning in 1923 (the acoustical AIDA Judgment Scene) and concluding in 1960 (an ‘Esultate’ from OTELLO recorded at the age of 70). Throughout, what we hear is a voice with a shining beauty at all dynamic levels, a scrupulous legato, and a consistent sensitivity to text and the dramatic situation….The ‘Todesverkundigung’ scene between Flagstad and Melchior is notable for the range of moods it captures. Siegmund’s refusal to accept Brunnhilde’s announcement of his imminent death is sung with gleaming tone and total vocal authority, and the chemistry between the two is palpable. Add in Marjorie Lawrence’s shining and rich soprano and her skill at shading, and this act receives the kind of vocal performance Wagner lovers today can only dream about….The sound is surprisingly good for a 1939 radio broadcast - clean and natural.

    With so many DIE WALKURE performances with Melchior already on the market, you might think this one [at the Met on January 24, 1948] is superfluous. I would, however, hate to have missed the opportunity to hear this example of the tenor in his final season performing Siegmund at the Met. It is incomprehensible for a singer who is a few months shy of 58, and who has been singing Wagnerian roles for a quarter century, to still be performing at this level. What we hear is still the evenly produced voice of the young hero, along with a knowing inflection of every phrase. It is also wonderful to have another example of the important American soprano Rose Bampton as Sieglinde. Her voice has a glowing ring, and it retains its fullness of sound all the way up to the top of her range. Her Sieglinde is somewhat less docile than some, but it does not lack femininity. Mihaly Szekely’s dark, black bass is perfect for Hunding. In the third scene of the second act we add the gloriously rich soprano of Helen Traubel, here displaying a freer top than she sometimes did. If you listen to the ‘Todesverkundigung’ scene here and in the San Francisco performance, you can appreciate how Melchior did not fall into routines. He is very specific in his interactions with each soprano; in both cases the dramatic tension of the scene is almost unbearable….

    The final major part of this set is the complete second act of TRISTAN from the Met in 1948. I have never seen this anywhere else and in fact had only heard about it as a ‘lost’ broadcast….Fritz Busch’s conducting is splendid in its balancing of freedom and discipline….Here Szekely gives a deeply moving performance. He manages to convey the complicated mix of anger and disappointment that is integral to Marke’s long monologue. Busch also creates a more sensuous and even erotic atmosphere in the love duet than most conductors did through the application of subtle rubato throughout the scene. This act alone should serve as a rebuke to those who claimed that Melchior lacked a strong internal rhythm; Busch’s supple flexibility is matched inflection for inflection by the tenor. Traubel is splendid also, with a big, warm, feminine sound. The top of her range is tight, but it is heard in only a brief passing moment. On the whole she and Melchior blend their two rich voices perfectly.

    In assessing the bonus material, it is probably the OTELLO excerpts that one should address first. Caniell has chosen a wonderful cross-section of extracts that demonstrate the degree of loss suffered by Met audiences due to the management’s limitation of Melchior to Wagner. Between 1926 and 1950 the Danish tenor sang 519 performances of operas by Wagner at the Met. While he did occasionally sing arias or scenes from operas by other composers at Met galas, he was never cast in a complete opera by any other composer!... In case you thought it was Melchior’s wish to limit himself to Wagner, the interview included in this set makes clear his disappointment in being pigeonholed.

    His case is clinched by the recordings here. The two of Otello’s monologue from act 3 (‘Dio! mi potevi’) are masterful. The 1927 recording (in German) encompasses all of the qualities one looks for in that scene. The opening sequence on one repeated note requires intelligence and imagination if the tenor is honoring Verdi’s purpose in dwelling on the same note. Vickers met this requirement, and in a different way so did Mario del Monaco and Martinelli. But Melchior may surpass them all in the way he varies the color of phrase after phrase, reflecting Otello’s inner agony. ….Another demonstration of the consistency he maintained over time is ‘Vesti la giubba’ from PAGLIACCI. We get his 1929 studio recording with Barbirolli conducting and a 1950 Voice of Firestone broadcast. The later version was sung when he was 60 years old, and yet there is virtually no degradation of tone or vocal technique.

    All of the Italian excerpts show a total comfort with the Italian line, even when sung in German. I was particularly taken with Cavaradossi’s ‘Recondita armonia’ from TOSCA, a performance (in Italian) marked by ardor and a broad arching line. One of the wonderful aspects of Immortal Performances releases is the wisdom of Richard Caniell’s choices from old radio broadcasts and all kinds of sources. The 23 minutes of interview material is fascinating. Melchior’s warmth and humor come across, along with his frustration at the way the Met typecast him.

    Now we come to the two booklets that are integral to this set. Immortal Performances’ booklets are always important components of their products. In this case they have outdone themselves. One 48-page booklet contains an intelligent and thoughtful analysis of Melchior’s art and career, ‘The Irreplaceable Lauritz Melchior’, by Dewey Faulkner, along with plot synopses and recording notes by Caniell. The second booklet is 56 pages, and its two main articles are by Caniell. They make for extremely provocative reading….Taken together, the two articles make the case that many of us have long believed, which is that both of those Met general managers were more interested in their own egos than the art that they supposedly served. Caniell has done his research and backs up his points with facts…along with brief but informative bios of all the major artists heard in the set….The three major Wagner performances are all released for the first time, giving the set major importance. The transfers are at the high level of quality we have come to expect from this label.”


  • - Henry Fogel, FANFARE, Nov. / Dec., 2020






  • TRISTANISSIMO - The Authorized Biography of Heroic Tenor Lauritz Melchior [Foreword by Birgit Nilsson], (Shirlee Emmons) [Foreword by Birgit Nilsson]. Discography; List of Melchior's Roles; Photos; DJ. Very long out-of-print, final New copies! (B0094)

    “Ms. Emmons' biography of Lauritz Melchior is breathtaking in its scope (data retrieved from hundreds of living sources, thousands of written and recorded sources, and her own experiences with the legendary singer) and impressive in that the author presented her subject as he lived and breathed instead of writing an idealized hagiography or vindictive hit piece.

    It turns out that, along with having the voice of an electified deity, Lauritz Melchior was a human being. Emmons' masterful biography reveals all of his faults in a way that, while never excusing or forgiving them, manages to still love the man who was THE tenor of Wagner operas and love him for being that man and not because he was an unparalleled possessor of a superhuman voice.

    TRISTANISSIMO is masterfully written and has the reader feeling floods of emotions whether celebrating the subject's triumphs or wanting to strike him with a cast iron skillet for his failures. I recommend it to all fans of Wagner, opera, and Melchior.”


  • - Thomas N. Brogan






  • YEHUDI MENUHIN & MAURICE GENDRON: Sonata for Violin & Cello (Ravel); YEHUDI & JEREMY MENUHIN: Violin Sonata in g (Debussy) [“I wrote this sonata only to be rid of the thing, spurred on by my dear publisher. This sonata will be interesting from a documentary point of view and as an example of what may be produced by a sick man in time of war.” – Claude Debussy]; YEHUDI MENUHIN, BRUNO PASQUIER, MAURICE GENDRON & JEREMY MENUHIN: Piano Quartet #1 in c, Op.15 (Faure); JEANNE-MARIE DARRE & JACQUES FEVRIER: Dolly Suite (Faure); Ma Mere l’Oye (Ravel) – Live Performance, 17 June, 1958, Pavillon Philips, Brussels; QUATUOR VIA NOVA(Mouillere, le Floch, Causse, Benedetti & Jeanne-Marie Darre): Concerto in D, Op.21 (Chausson), Live Performance, 31 March, 1971, Salle Playel, Paris. [Among Yves St Laurent's most remarkable issues; the Chausson Concerto is truly the piece de resistance!] (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio T-1133. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0800)

    “Yehudi Menuhin enjoyed a unique position outside his greatness as a violinist. The political upheavals of the twentieth century caused some famous musicians to protest on behalf of freedom, including Toscanini’s refusal to conduct in Mussolini’s Italy and Pablo Casals’ highly visible self-exile from Franco’s Spain. The issue of freedom versus tyranny didn’t occupy Menuhin as much as his advocacy of humanitarianism. He toured the Nazi death camp at Bergen-Belsen after World War II and gave two recitals with Benjamin Britten in a displaced persons camp; he also made himself a lightning rod by being one of the first Jewish artists after the war to perform under Furtwangler. If you are attuned to this inspirational quality, which Menuhin’s students and fellow musicians responded to strongly, it seems to emerge in his performances as well.

    As an admirer who considers him a musical hero, I hear something special in St. Laurent Studio’s release of a live concert from the Salle Pleyel, Paris in 1971. Menuhin, like Joseph Szigeti and Christian Tetzlaff, makes the violin ‘speak’ in gradations of tone that aim at the same expression as the human voice rather than beautiful tone for its own sake. This makes even his later performances - Menuhin was 55 at the time of this concert - an opportunity to appreciate his gifts, despite a much remarked upon decline in his technique. Whether or not technical issues play a critical part in your response to this generous 2-CD set is an individual matter, naturally. I had no trouble hearing the musicianship behind some passing flaws in intonation.

    In chamber music, particularly in later years, Menuhin liked to make it a family affair, which included his sister Hepzibah, who accompanies him here in the Debussy Violin Sonata, and son Jeremy, who is the pianist in the Faure Piano Quartet #1. Also part of the immediate circle were the cellist Maurice Gendron and pianist Jacques Fevrier. Menuhin may not be closely associated with French repertoire, but he made a studio recording of the Debussy sonata with Fevrier in 1974 for EMI, and there is a live recording with Benjamin Britten from much earlier, at the 1959 Aldeburgh Festival, when Menuhin’s technique was more secure and Britten served as a wonderfully imaginative pianist.

    Here in Paris, Hepzibah might not be Britten’s equal, but she offers spirited accompaniment, and Menuhin, who is closely miked, provides the kind of tonal variety and nuance that I so appreciate from him. The reading has real presence, and Menuhin applies both intensity and delicacy. The Violin Sonata is very late in Debussy’s career and represents a deliberate simplification of style. It’s a challenge to add an extra dimension to the music, but Menuhin does.

    He has a more equal partner in Ravel’s strikingly unusual Sonata for Violin and Cello. The score occupied Ravel between 1920 and 1922 and was dedicated to Debussy, who had died in 1918. The spare instrumentation limits the composer’s remarkable gift for instrumental color, but the second movement, marked ‘Tres vif’, uses an ordinary technique like pizzicato to create a strangely ominous mood, which Menuhin and Gendron throw themselves into with a will. Throughout there is a powerful presence in their playing, and a sense of abandon that one might not identify with Menuhin. (This same performance can be found in Warner’s 7-CD box set, THE MENUHIN CENTURY.)

    The two big ensemble works are the Faure Piano Quartet #1 and Chausson’s Concerto for Violin, Piano, and String Quartet, the former being much more common on disc than the latter. (Menuhin made studio recordings of both works, but my cursory investigation didn’t disclose that either performance made it to CD - Menuhin’s recordings from every period have been reissued so often that there’s always a chance that my information is wrong.) Except for a change in violist, the lineup for the Faure is the same as the HMV stereo LP account, which dates from 1971, the same year as this concert. Son Jeremy was only 19 at the time, and he finds himself in august company. Without being a model of polished execution, this live performance is carried along by its vibrancy and a palpable joy in making music.

    I found it a delightful listen, and the Chausson concerto, with the noted French pianist Jeanne-Marie Darrre, exudes passion and conviction. (The pianist in the studio account was Louis Kentner.) In CD or digital format the Chausson is a particularly important addition for Menuhin collectors, and as remastered by Yves St.-Laurent, the recorded sound is very good FM broadcast stereo for the time; there is virtually no tape hiss and no other sonic irritants at all. Darre’s piano playing is eloquent, and the whole performance is inspiring.

    Darre returns with Fevrier as a piano duo in the bonus material that fills out CD 2 which comes from a 1958 recital in Brussels. Faure’s Dolly Suite is played with the utmost charm. Ravel’s delicate Ma mere l’Oye is given in the original 1910 suite of five movements for piano duet. This performance is a model of refinement and complete understanding of Ravel’s idiom. Necessarily the mono sound is limited - the pianos are far forward in a dry acoustic, which makes their tone rather hard—but it is very listenable in YSL’s clean remastering.

    This release is Vol. 15 in the series of ‘Raretes francaises’ from St. Laurent Studio. As prodigious as this label’s output is in every genre, it has proved to be a unique source for French recitals by famous performers. This new release is treasurable in every musical respect and honors Menuhin (and company) as the invaluable artist he was. Strongly recommended.”


  • - Huntley Dent, FANFARE






  • ANNIE FISCHER, w.David Zinman Cond. Rochester Phil.: Concerto #3 in c (Beethoven), Live Performance, 6 Nov., 1982, Eastman Theatre, Rochester; w.Claudio Abbado Cond. RAI S.O., Milano: Piano Concerto #1 in E-flat (Liszt), 1964. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1105. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1391)

    “Annie Fischer, a Hungarian pianist known for the elegance of her Mozart performances and her vital, prismatic approach to early Romantic repertory, was a pianist who played with an intensity of concentration and focus that seemed almost at odds with the poetry and impetuousness of her interpretive style….She made her public performing debut in Budapest when she was 8, and she toured as a concerto soloist when she was 12. Her mature career began in 1933 when she toured Europe as the winner of the first prize in the Franz Liszt International Piano Competition. In 1935 she married the musicologist and conductor Aladar Toth, who died in 1971. In 1941 they left Hungary for Sweden, and Miss Fischer suspended her performing career during World War II. She began touring Europe again in 1946, after she and her husband returned to Budapest. But she did not make her United States debut until 1961, when she played the Mozart Concerto in E flat (K. 482) with George Szell and the Cleveland Orchestra at Carnegie Hall. Her American performances thereafter were sporadic, and she made her belated Carnegie Hall recital debut in 1982.”


  • - Allan Kozinn, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 13 April, 1995








    - - - REPEATED FROM THE RECENT PAST - - -










  • GYORGY CZIFFRA: Chopin, Liszt, Chopin-Liszt, Saint-Saens & Mendelssohn Recital. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1107, Live Performance, 3 July, 1980, Ossiach Abbey, Karnten, Austria. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1392)





  • GYORGY CZIFFRA: Prelude & Fugue in D (Bach-Busoni); Sonata #2 in b-flat, Op.35; Meine Freuden; Madchens Wunsch; Valse brillante in A-flat; Valse in A-flat, Op.69, #1; Valse in A-flat, Op.42 (all Chopin); Etude en forme de valse (Saint-Saens); 'Appassionata' Transcendental Etude #10 in f (Liszt). [A brilliant recital, not to be missed; one wonders how the piano withstood the tension!!!] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1106. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1380)





  • EMIL GILELS: Scriabin & Prokofiev Recital; 'Hammerklavier' Sonata #29 in D-flat (Beethoven). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-1155, Live Performance, 5 Feb., 1984, Royal Festival Hall, London. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1385)





  • YVONNE LEFEBURE: Bach, Debussy & Beethoven (incl. the latter's Sonata #31, in A-flat, Op.110). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1103, Live Performance, 27 June, 1973, Chapelle Saint Louis, Chateau Saint-Germain-en-Laye [Yvonne Lefebure's last solo recital, breathtaking performances!]. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1393)





  • MICHELE AUCLAIR, w.Roger Albin Cond. Strasbourg Radio S.O.: Violin Concerto #2 in E, BWV 1042 (Bach), Live Performance, 12 Jan., 1968; Violin Concerto #3 in b (Saint-Saens), Live Performance, 27 June, 1970; MICHELE AUCLAIR & ROGER LEPAUW, w. Fernand Oubradous Cond. Paris Chamber Orch.: Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat, K.364 (Mozart), Live Performance, 5 March, 1961, Salle Gaveau, Paris. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1172. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0797)





  • DAVID OISTRAKH, w.Topilin, Giakov, Makarov, Yampolsky (Pfs.): Glinia, Hubay, Scriabin, Daquin, Chopin, Kreisler & Paganini; w.Gauk Cond. USSR S.O.: Violin Concerto in d (Myaskovsky) [Performed by the dedicatee who played the premiere in Moscow on 10 Jan., 1939]. (Canada) St Laurent Studio 78-1126, recorded 1937-49. [A treasurable recital!] Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0799)





  • NATHAN MILSTEIN, w.Roger Albin Cond. Strasbourg Radio S.O.: Violin Concerto #4 in D, K.218 (Mozart), Live Performance, 7 July, 1962; w. Antal Dorati Cond. French National Orch.: Violin Concerto in D (Beethoven), Live Performance, 5 June, 1978. [This Beethoven Concerto is a true Milstein 'discovery'] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1027. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0796)





  • NADIA BOULANGER Cond. RDF Orchestra & Chorus: Adagio and Fugue in c, K. 546 (Mozart); w.Ludovic Vaillant: Trumpet Concerto in E-flat (Haydn); w.Eugenia Uminska: Violin Concerto (Roman Palester); w.Maurice Durufle, Giselle Peyron, Stella Tavares & Joseph Peyron: Du Fond de L'Abime; Psaume 24, Psaume 129, Vieille priere bouddhique, Pie Jesu (all Lili Boulanger). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-1175, Live Performance, 15 Sept., 1948. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1882)



  • JEAN MARTINON Cond. ORTF S.O.: Water Music Suite (Handel); Symphony #5 in c (Beethoven); Le Sacre du Printemps (Stravinsky). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1186, Live Performance, 4 Sept., 1970, Besancon. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1879)





  • RAFAEL KUBELIK Cond. Bayerischen Rundfunks, w.Helen Donath, Brigitte Fassbaender, Horst Laubenthal & Hans Sotin: Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Dvorak, Bruckner, Berlioz, Smetana, Janacek, Hartmann & Bartok. (Austria) 15-Orfeo C 981 115, Live Performances, 1963-85, w.detailed booklet. Final Sealed Copy! (C1855)





  • DIMITRI MITROPOULOS Cond. Vienna Phil.: 'Tragic' Symphony #6 in a (Mahler). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-960, Live Performance, 22 Sept., 1957. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1883)





  • ARTURO TOSCANINI Cond. NBC S.O.: Lohengrin - Act I Prelude; Tristan - Act I Prelude; w.HELEN TRAUBEL & LAURITZ MELCHIOR: Excerpts from Tristan, Tannhauser, Die Walkure & Gotterdammerung – Live Performance, 22 Feb., 1941, Carnegie Hall; ARTURO TOSCANINI Cond. NBC S.O.: Der Fliegende Hollander – Overture (plus rehearsal); Tannhauser - Act III Prelude; w.HELEN TRAUBEL & LAURITZ MELCHIOR: Die Walkure - Act I, Scene 3 - 1947 rehearsal. (Canada) 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1043. Transfers by Richard Caniell. Program Notes by Robert Matthew-Walker, William Youngren & Richard Caniell. (C1318)

    Specially priced at Three discs for the price of Two.



  • TRISTAN UND ISOLDE, Live Performance, 6 Feb., 1943, (replete with Milton Cross' commentary), w. Leinsdorf Cond. Metropolitan Opera Ensemble; Lauritz Melchior, Helen Traubel, Kerstin Thorborg, Julius Huehn, Alexander Kipnis, etc. (Canada) 3-Immortal Performances IPCD 1102. Notes by Richard Caniell & Dewey Faulkner plus a performance review by Claudia Cassidy. Transfers by Richard Caniell. Beautiful Edition features numerous lovely photos & elaborate 46pp. booklet. (OP3284)



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    BOOKS ON SALE



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    Books have become our lonely stepchildren! By spending so many hours constantly revising our thousands of CDs we realize we have paid scant attention to our BOOKS ON SALE, thus many have been added (with more appearing), accompanied by greatly reduced prices! Have a glance at our SALE section - for BOOKS!



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    . . . numerous out-of-print CDs and LPs,

    [many sealed copies of numerous out-of-print

    additions: The Record Collector, Naxos, VRCS,

    Issues of Symposium's Harold Wayne series,

    Romophone, GOP & many Met Opera

    broadcasts & operas from Moscow’s Aquarius, plus

    numerous lesser-known operas have been added

    throughout our listings, in appropriate categories . . .

    out-of-print books [many biographies,

    Record Catalogue-Discographies . . .

    numerous CDs are added each week] . . .





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    COLLECTOR ALERT ! ! !



    Norbeck, Peters & Ford's Auction #151 has Closed. We want to take this opportunity to thank everyone for participating in Auction #151.

    Auction #151 now closed Saturday, 30 November 2019.

    We invite you to review our Auction #151. It is comprised of Vocal, Victor 'GEMS', Light Opera, and Spoken Word Records.

    To view the online version of our auction #151, simply click the link below:

    Auction #151 Online Catalog

    To download a copy of Auction #151, simply click the link below:

    Auction #151 Catalog File Download ** This auction has been applied online in various sections in order to facilitate faster loading, especially on mobile phones.

    Enjoy perusing!



    Once again . . .

    Welcome to our bookshop & list of Original Cast LPs, www.norpete.com where you will see a vast array of excellent, used out-of-print books. You're sure to find many books of interest which may have long eluded you, so now is your opportunity to fill in missing gaps. Our online bookshop includes composer and performer autobiographies and biographies. Soon we will include musical criticism, theory and history, plus histories of symphony orchestras, opera houses and festivals. In addition, we shall offer quite an array of vocal scores, many of which are most rare and unusual.

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  • Lauritz Melchior - A Tribute;   Kirsten Flagstad, Helen Traubel, Marjorie Lawrence, Mihaly Szekely  (4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1139)
    V2646. LAURITZ MELCHIOR: A Tribute, incl. DIE WALKÜRE - Act 2, w.Edwin McArthur Cond. San Francisco Opera Ensemble; Kirsten Flagstad (Brünnhilde); Marjorie Lawrence (Sieglinde); Herta Glaz (Fricka); Lauritz Melchior (Siegmund); Fred Destal (Wotan), San Francisco War Memorial Opera House 10/24/1939; DIE WALKÜRE - Act 1; Act 2, Scene 3, w.Fritz Stiedry Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Rose Bampton (Sieglinde); Helen Traubel (Brünnhilde); Lauritz Melchior (Siegmund); Mihály Székely (Hunding), Metropolitan Opera, 1/24/1948; TRISTAN - Act 2, w. Fritz Busch Cond.Met Opera Ensemble; Helen Traubel (Isolde); Blanche Thebom (Brangäne); Lauritz Melchior (Tristan); Mihály Székely (King Marke), Metropolitan Opera, 1/3/1948; Aida - Judgment Scene (with Margarethe Arndt-Ober); Otello - Esultate! Dio mi potevi (2 recordings); Niun mi tema; Tosca: Recondita armonia; Mattinata (Leoncavallo); Pagliacci - Vesti la giubba (2 recordings); Zueignung; Heimliche Aufforderung (both Strauss); Ständchen (Schubert); Hrorer du! (Severre Jordan); Ich liebe dich (Grieg); Der fliegende Holländer - Mit Gewitter und Sturm; Die Meistersinger: Preislied. (2 recordings); Die Walküre - Winterstürme; Lohengrin - In fernem Land; Mein lieber Schwan; Parsifal - Nur eine Waffe taugt! (2 recordings); Siegfried - Nothung!; Wesendonck-Lieder – Träume; Interview with Melchior. (Canada) 4-Immortal Performances IPCD 1139. Restoration and Transfers by Richard Caniell. Notes by Richard Caniell & Dewey Faulkner. This remarkable set features two elaborate 48pp and 56pp brochures. - 787790581888
    $59.95
    Lauritz Melchior  -  Tristanissimo    (Emmons)   (28730607)
    B0094. TRISTANISSIMO - The Authorized Biography of Heroic Tenor Lauritz Melchior [Foreword by Birgit Nilsson], (Shirlee Emmons). New York, Schirmer, 1990. 462pp. Index; Bibliography; Definitive Hansen Discography; List of Melchior's Roles; Photos; DJ. Very long out-of-print, final New copies! - 28730607
    Regular price: $29.90
    Sale price: $14.95
    Yehudi Menuhin, Bruno Pasquier, Maurice Gendron, Jeanne-Marie Darre, Jacques Fevrier    (2-St Laurent Studio T-1133)
    S0800.YEHUDI MENUHIN & MAURICE GENDRON: Sonata for Violin & Cello (Ravel); YEHUDI & JEREMY MENUHIN: Violin Sonata in g (Debussy) [“I wrote this sonata only to be rid of the thing, spurred on by my dear publisher. This sonata will be interesting from a documentary point of view and as an example of what may be produced by a sick man in time of war.” – Claude Debussy]; YEHUDI MENUHIN, BRUNO PASQUIER, MAURICE GENDRON & JEREMY MENUHIN: Piano Quartet #1 in c, Op.15 (Fauré); JEANNE-MARIE DARRÉ & JACQUES FÉVRIER: Dolly Suite (Fauré); Ma Mère l’Oye (Ravel) – Live Performance, 17 June, 1958, Pavillon Philips, Brussels; QUATUOR VIA NOVA (Mouillère, le Floch, Caussé, Benedetti & Jeanne-Marie Darré): Concerto in D, Op.21 (Chausson), Live Performance, 31 March, 1971, Salle Playel, Paris. [Among Yves St Laurent's most remarkable issues; the Chausson Concerto is truly the pièce de résistance!] (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio T-1133. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $29.90
    Annie Fischer, Vol. IX;  David Zinman;  Claudio Abbado  (St Laurent Studio YSL T-1105)
    P1391. ANNIE FISCHER, w.David Zinman Cond. Rochester Phil.: Concerto #3 in c (Beethoven), Live Performance, 6 Nov., 1982, Eastman Theatre, Rochester; w.Claudio Abbado Cond. RAI S.O., Milano: Piano Concerto #1 in E-flat (Liszt), 1964. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-1105. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $19.90