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Historical Reissue Classical CDs, LPs, 78s,
Related Books & Ephemera
Since 1972

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Richard Caniell offers TOSCANINI's NYPO Farewell Concerts . . .

Yves St Laurent presents his 8th volume of

STEINBERG (Mahler with Boston S.O.) . . .

the 4th volume of PERLEMUTER . . .

and THYSSENS-VALENTIN . . .

plus new titles on 'sale'



COLLECTOR ALERT ! ! !



Norbeck, Peters & Ford's Annual 78rpm Auction has been released!

Norbeck, Peters & Ford's new 78rpm AUCTION #151 is now online for your perusal (email address)- closing date is Tuesday, 26 November.

We invite you to review our just released Auction #151. It is comprised of Vocal, Victor 'GEMS', Light Opera, and Spoken Word Records.

To view the online version of our auction, simply click the link below:

Auction #150 Online Catalog

To download a copy of Auction #150, simply click the link below:

Auction #150 Catalog File Download ** This auction has been applied online in various sections in order to facilitate faster loading, especially on mobile phones.

Enjoy perusing!

We also have our weekly offerings:

  • WILLIAM STEINBERG Cond. Boston Symphony Orchestra: Symphony #7 in e (Mahler); 'Linz' Symphony #36 in C, K.425 (Mozart). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-915, Live Performance, 18 Dec., 1970, Symphony Hall, Boston. [...beautifully displaying the splendor of the Symphony Hall acoustic.] Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1751)

    “William Steinberg’s…Mozart and Mahler program presented here from December, 1970 cannot be characterized in blanket fashion. The Mozart ‘Linz’ Symphony is, by the standards of that period, lean and crisp. Yes, it is ‘big band’ Mozart, but transparent textures, reasonably fast tempos, and crisp attacks make Steinberg’s approach sound less old-fashioned than what we might expect. There is energy throughout and terrific playing from what was then (and is now) one of the world’s great orchestras.

    The main attraction, however, is the Mahler. In 1970 the Seventh Symphony was not frequently performed or recorded. It is in some ways the most difficult of Mahler’s symphonies for a conductor. It encompasses a huge diversity of moods and even styles, and the challenge is to make it all sound as if it is a single coherent work. The two ‘Nachtmusik’ movements require an almost gossamer-like touch and very carefully thought through tempo relationships, while the last movement presents problems because it combines an almost exuberant vulgarity with moments of great finesse. Steinberg and the Boston Symphony sound completely committed to the work. One senses a feeling of participating in a special occasion because of the rarity of the work. The Boston Symphony had played the work only twice before, in the 1948-49 season under Serge Koussevitzky. Two decades later it must have required the musicians to learn their parts all over again if they had been around that long.

    I would not recommend this as ‘the’ recording of the Mahler Seventh for a collection. But for those who have an interest in the legacy of Mahler performances or in William Steinberg, this is a gratifying release. The energy and concentration at the core of the performance never flag, and Steinberg’s coloristic flair is likely to surprise those who categorize him as only a skilled Kapellmeister. At 71 minutes the performance is on the quick side, but it never sounds rushed because of the flexibility of the phrasing. While this Mahler Seventh lacks the unique flair of performances by Bernstein and Tennstedt, neither is it routine. I am definitely intending to return to it in the future. There are some inevitable bloopers in a live performance (some French horn bobbles in the second movement, for example). The FM-stereo recording, made originally by WCRB in Boston, is a bit congested at climaxes but overall is pleasant and clear enough. As usual with St. Laurent Studio, the transfer is very good and there are no notes. Conveniently, the Mozart occupies first disc, the Mahler the second.”


  • - Henry Fogel, FANFARE




  • ARTURO TOSCANINI Cond. NYPO: Die Meistersinger - Act I Prelude; Siegfried Idyll; Tristan - Act I Prelude; Liebestod; Die Walküre - Ride of the Valkeryies - Live Performance, 29 April, 1936 - Toscanini's NYPO Farewell Concert; Tannhauser - Overture & Bacchanal - Live Performance, 3 Feb., 1935; ARTURO TOSCANINI Cond. NYPO: 'The Clock" Symphony #101 in D (Haydn); I Pini di Roma (Respighi); The Swan of Tuonela (Sibelius); Euyranthe – Overture (von Weber), Live Performance, 13 Feb., 1945 - Pension Fund Concert. (Canada) 2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1105, with 1936 broadcast commentary by Davidson Taylor. Published in association with the Toscanini Estate. Transfers by Richard Caniell. The handsome 39pp. booklet features Notes by Robert Matthew-Walker, John Sullivan & Richard Caniell). (C1752)

    “On April 29, 1936, Toscanini conducted his final concert as the NYPO’s music director. The broadcast portion of the concert comprised works by Richard Wagner. Even after Toscanini began his affiliation with the NBC SO, Toscanini returned on occasion to lead the NY Philharmonic. On January 13, 1945, Toscanini and the NY Philharmonic performed a Carnegie Hall concert, held as a benefit for the Musicians’ Pension Fund. On that occasion, Toscanini chose precisely the same program as his January 14, 1926 debut. It proved to be Toscanini’s final concert with the NY Philharmonic. And so, both the April 29, 1936 and January 13, 1945 concerts are farewells of sorts. The concerts are paired on a new Immortal Performances set. I’ve had the occasion when reviewing other Toscanini-NY Philharmonic Immortal Performances sets (of both commercial and in-performance recordings), to write about the unique importance of these documents. When Toscanini first led the NY Philharmonic, he was 58 and at the height of his powers. It’s not surprising that Toscanini’s work with the NY Philharmonic reveals an incredible precision of ensemble, a glorious singing tone, and an unerring sense of the work’s architecture and overall momentum. These are all qualities familiar from Toscanini’s NBC SO legacy. But the NY Philharmonic recordings also document an interpreter far more willing to explore broader tempos, a beguiling application of rubato and, on occasion, the tantalizing use of string glissandos. In addition, the NY Philharmonic was an ensemble of greater beauty and tonal richness throughout the registers than Toscanini’s excellent NBC SO. You might argue (and I do) that the NY Philharmonic years represent Toscanini’s finest as a conductor - at least, among the years preserved on recordings. Every Toscanini-NY Philharmonic recording is a treasure to be explored and savored. These ‘farewell’ concerts are no exception.

    Immortal Performances’ source for the April 29, 1936 Wagner concert is a set of 16-inch lacquer discs, recorded privately and off the air. In his Recording Notes, Richard Caniell details the care, labor, and technology required to overcome the flaws in the lacquer discs, as well as flaws created by the original broadcast engineers, whose microphone placement compromised both dynamic range and ensemble detail. The restored 1936 concert does not approximate the sonic quality of contemporaneous studio recordings (Toscanini’s commercial recordings with the NY Philharmonic for Victor are among the glories of that era). But the sound on the Immortal Performances release provides ample dynamic range, detail, and color, allowing anyone experienced with historic recordings to enjoy these magnificent performances. The opening Prelude to Act I of DIE MEISTERSINGER is superb in every way. Toscanini adopts a broad tempo that showcases the NY Philharmonic’s glorious rich and ideally blended sound. During the course of this Prelude, indeed the entire concert, there is not a measure that sounds either too slow or too hurried. Toscanini’s pacing is unerring, and he and the orchestra revel in the Wagner’s many delightful comic moments. The glorious final measures glow with all the majesty one could hope for. Two months before this concert, Toscanini and the NY Philharmonic made a commercial recording of the ‘Siegfried Idyll’. It remains one of the finest renditions on disc. The sound of the April 1936 concert, as captured by the off-the-air discs, cannot begin to compete sonically with the commercial recording. Nevertheless, Caniell’s restoration allows us to enjoy a performance that is remarkable for its sustained hushed lyrical beauty and forward pulse. Thanks to the Immortal Performances restoration, one gets a sense of how overwhelming this rendition must have been for the Carnegie Hall audience. The performance of the TRISTAN Prelude and ‘Liebestod’ conveys, in breathtaking fashion, Wagner’s ongoing harmonic tension and release, culminating in Isolde’s final ecstatic outburst. It is one of the most intense and in the end, most beautiful renditions I’ve heard of this pathbreaking, iconic music. A blazing, razor-sharp performance of the ‘Ride of the Valkyries’ concludes the program. The broadcast includes Davidson Taylor’s spoken commentary. Relegated to a separate track is his description of an incident in which a flash bulb temporarily blinded Toscanini, rendering the conductor unable to return to the stage for further bows. The disc concludes with a February 3, 1935 broadcast performance of the Overture and Bacchanale (Venusberg Music) from TANNHAÜSER (the Toscanini Estate provided the source recording for this music). The performance is again first-rate, beautifully paced and thrillingly executed. I have to confess that as much as I love Wagner, the Venusberg Music always overstays my welcome. Still, Toscanini and the orchestra give the music its full due.

    The January 13, 1945 Pension Benefit Concert was not broadcast. However, at the request of Toscanini’s son, Walter, Carnegie Hall recorded the program on 16-inch lacquer discs. Immortal Performances’ restoration derives from a tape recording of those lacquer discs. My previous experience with this concert has been via a 2010 release on the Guild Historical label, billed as being derived ‘from second generation transcriptions’. The Guild release is good enough to offer a fair representation of the concert. But it suffers from compressed dynamics and a lack of high-end response. The Immortal Performances set represents a significant improvement, with far greater dynamic range, instrumental color, and sense of concert stage depth. If the Immortal Performances restoration is not the equal of commercial recordings of the time it is close to that quality, and more than adequate to convey the electric atmosphere of the occasion. The performances are once again of the highest order. The Haydn ‘Clock’ Symphony is a wonderful synthesis of lyricism, energy, and humor, all executed to perfection. When Toscanini led the Philharmonic in the January 14, 1926 performance of Respighi’s ‘The Pines of Rome’, it was the New York premiere of the work. For the remainder of his career, Toscanini remained a foremost advocate of the piece. In the Pension Fund Concert, the NY Philharmonic (a small horn bobble apart in the opening portion) plays its heart out for Toscanini and Respighi. A rapt ‘Swan of Tuonela’ precedes a glorious account of Siegfried’s Death and Funeral March. Weber’s Overture to EURYANTHE, a wonderful Romantic orchestral showpiece, is a blazing and appropriate conclusion to this concert, and to Toscanini’s long and treasured association with the Philharmonic. The accompanying booklet includes essays by Robert Matthew-Walker, John Sullivan, and Richard Caniell. The Toscanini-New York Philharmonic legacy is one of the great artistic collaborations of the 20th century. Thanks to Immortal Performances for providing such important documents of that legacy, and in recorded sound that does them justice. A wonderful set, and very highly recommended.”


  • - Ken Meltzer, FANFARE, Nov. / Dec., 2018






  • VLADO PERLEMUTER: RAVEL D'APRES RAVEL, Vol. IV (featuring the latter's Menuet sur le nom de Haydn; Valses nobles et sentimentales; A la maniere de Borodine; À la maniere de Chabrier; Le Tombeau de Couperin; Ma Mere l'Oye & Prelude [the latter two in compromised sound]). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-815, Broadcast Performances, April - June, 1952, Paris, w.broadcast announcements throughout these recitals. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1321)

    “This volume features a special series of radio programs called RAVEL D'APRES RAVEL. The program was broadcast in 1952 to mark the 15th anniversary of Ravel's death. The host of the program, Helene Jourdan-Morhange, was a violinist and known as Ravel's Muse (Ravel dedicated his Violin Sonata to her) and she had a very close relationship with Ravel. And Perlemuter, as we know, studied with the composer extensively at his home in 1927. So this is why this program is called RAVEL D'APRES RAVEL. Both the host and the pianist knew Ravel, and the program goes like this: the two would first discuss how Ravel taught Perlemuter to play one of his piano works, and then Perlemuter played it in complete format. This is why this volume has quite extensive dialogues in French before each track. Later Jourdan-Morhange and Perlemuter published the whole discussion in a book with the same name. This book is a ‘must-read’ for all Ravel researchers and piano students learning his works.”


    - Jim Tang




    “If Vlado Perlemuter, the revered French pianist who studied with Ravel and Faure and was an acclaimed interpreter of their works, never attained widespread public renown, it may have been because of a certain self-effacing quality in his pianism. But he was enormously respected by musicians and his many admirers, who found his playing a model of refinement and elegance.

    Vlado Perlemuter studied privately with the Polish-German pianist Moritz Moszkowski. At 13, he entered the Paris Conservatory, where he worked with the legendary pianist Alfred Cortot and also studied with Faure. In 1919, at 15, he won the Conservatory's prestigious Premier Prix. During the 1920s, Mr. Perlemuter took lessons privately with Ravel and became one of the first pianists to perform Ravel's complete works. His personal copies of the Ravel scores were covered with instructions written in this master's hand.

    Mr. Perlemuter’s 1955 recording of the complete Ravel piano works became a landmark. Recording them in later years for Nimbus, Mr. Perlemuter played whole stretches of the repertory nonstop, Mr. Farmer said. The recordings were released with almost no touch-ups or editing.”


  • - Anthony Tommasini, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 7 Sept., 2002






  • GERMAINE THYSSENS-VALENTIN, w.Jacques Beaudry Cond. RTF S.O.: Ballade in F-sharp - Broadcast Performance, 2 March, 1962; w.Michel Debost (Flute): Fantasie for Flute & Piano; w.Pierre Mollet (Bar.): La bonne chanson; w.Loewenguth Quartet: Piano Quintet in c - Broadcast Performance, 1961, Paris (all Faure). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-898. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1322)

    “I now have not the slightest doubt that Germaine Thyssens-Valentin was a great and inspired pianist; I've heard Faure playing that approaches, or even occasionally equals hers, but none that surpasses it. Faure's music has a confiding quality to it, as though it were a message intended for an audience of one, and Thyssens-Valentin is in perfect accord with this. Those messages…are often of great profundity, and she has both the heart and the technique to convey them. I have not often been so struck by Faure's extraordinary courage in distilling emotions far too deep for words from the silent isolation of his old age. Why is Thyssens-Valentin not better known? I suppose that being a superlative interpreter of Faure was not a reliable passport to international fame in the middle years of the 20th century.”


    - Michael Oliver, GRAMOPHONE, Aug., 2002




    ["Thyssens-Valentin's] playing of Faure is distinctive, fluid, understated and of a rare tonal and poetic delicacy and finesse … No other pianist, in my experience, has shown a comparable inwardness or capacity to penetrate to the very quick or essence of one of music's most misunderstood geniuses."


    - Bryce Morrison, GRAMOPHONE Awards Issue 2002




    "Thyssens-Valentin's direct, graceful, unpretentious performances can seem soothingly maternal and imperturbable, infused with a seemingly lost sense of inner poise and tranquility."


  • - Benjamin Ivry, CLASSIC RECORD COLLECTOR, Spring, 2007








    . . . REPEATED . . . FROM THE RECENT PAST . . .








  • I PURITANI, Live Performance, 13 March, 1976, w.Bonynge Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Joan Sutherland, Luciano Pavarotti, Sherrill Milnes, James Morris, etc. (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-914. (OP3321)

    "Wow! That is my one-word summary for this remarkable display of bravura singing….for the kind of visceral thrill that is always more likely to occur in a live performance, this Metropolitan Opera broadcast from 1976 stands apart. One gets the feeling that everyone involved knew, deep down, that this assemblage of singers was producing something that might not be repeatable…. in the end one purchases a recording of I PURITANI for the soprano, and possibly for the soprano and tenor. Joan Sutherland and Luciano Pavarotti were justly famed for this kind of music, and here they deliver. Pavarotti, at 41, was in the middle of his prime years, and Sutherland, nine years older, was near the end of hers. In fact, in the first few minutes of her singing Sutherland exhibits a bit of cloudiness and tonal unsteadiness in her middle register. This vanishes quickly, and from then on she demonstrates why she was a superstar. What made Sutherland so unusual was the flexibility of her voice combined with its size and richness. Her coloratura is cleanly articulated without aspiration, and her high notes are a natural extension of the voice.

    Pavarotti was not yet the superstar of 'The three tenors' (that phenomenon began in Rome in 1990). At this stage he still sang as if he truly cared about subtleties of dynamic shading and dramatic interaction. His glorious, bright tenor is used here with an intelligence that you might find surprising if you only know the Pavarotti of the late 1990s and early 2000s. There is a wonderful naturalness to his phrase-shaping, and he interacts dramatically with everyone else in a convincing manner….This is singing that is simultaneously beautiful and thrilling….for some of us the kind of tumultuous, almost hysterical, ovations given this performance are part of the thrill. In sum: anyone who loves the bel canto era should own this recording. We overuse words like 'unforgettable', but this truly is!"


  • - Henry Fogel, FANFARE






  • JOSEF KRIPS Cond. San Francisco S.O.: Leonore Overture #3; Symphony #5 in c; 'Pastorale' Symphony #6 in F (all Beethoven). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-559, Live Performance, 2 Dec., 1966. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1749)





  • KLAUS TENNSTEDT Cond. Cleveland Orchestra, w.Ruth Welting, Julian Patrick & Douglas Ahlstedt: CARMINA BURANA (Orff), Live Performance, 14 July, 1978, Blossom Festival. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-884. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1750)

    "If I could only take one piece of music on a long trip, I might pick Carl Orff's CARMINA BURANA. Its 25 tracks offer something for everyone - and a piece of music for every mood imaginable. The subject matter covered in CARMINA stays pretty basic: love, lust, the pleasures of drinking and the heightened moods evoked by springtime. These primitive and persistently relevant themes are nicely camouflaged by the Latin and old German texts, so the listener can actually feign ignorance while listening to virtually X-rated lyrics.

    The music itself toggles between huge forces and a single voice, juxtaposing majesty and intimacy with ease. At its largest, CARMINA employs a chorus of 200 or more voices, an orchestra of 100 players and a children's choir of 50 or more, plus three soloists. The music's style is equally inclusive, ranging from simple chant to almost rock-inspired rhythmic sections. The opening and closing tracks, both titled ‘O Fortun’, mirror each other: They begin with all forces at full throttle, then immediately scale back in an ominous warning repetition that builds to a climactic close. Between these bookends lies music of many diverse styles, with a hypnotic repetitive element, an intense purity of the solo soprano and the children's choir, a raucous quality to the all-male sections, and a humor underlying the lewd nature of the lyrics (which sound so erudite in Latin), all combining to create an immediacy and accessibility not found in many works.

    CARMINA BURANA has enjoyed popularity and longevity, in large part due to its remarkable crossover ability. That may not have been what Orff envisioned when he wrote CARMINA BURANA in 1936, but he did have much more than a straightforward musical experience in mind. He subtitled his exuberant hour-long oratorio ‘Cantiones profanae, cantoribus et choris cantandae, comitantibus instrumentis atque imaginibus magicis’, or ‘Secular songs for singers and choruses accompanied by instruments and magical images’ - hardly typical concert fare.”


  • - Marin Alsop, 11 Nov., 2006






  • PIERRE BOULEZ Cond. NYPO, w. JESSYE NORMAN, KENNETH RIEGEL, JUSTINO DIAZ & WILLIAM PARKER: LA DAMNATION DE FAUST (Berlioz) (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-881, Live Performance, 12 May, 1977, Avery Fisher Hall. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1737)





  • SAMSON FRANCOIS: Chopin & Prokofiev (the latter's Sonata #7 in B-flat) - Live Performance, 11 June, 1959 Strasbourg; w.Louis Martin Cond. Orchestre Municipal de Strasbourg: Piano Concerto for the Left Hand (Ravel); Piano Concerto #3 in E (Bartok) - Live Performance, 21 June, 1961. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-916. (P1324)





  • LEONID KOGAN: Partita #1 in b – Sarabande; w. Ackermann Cond. Philharmonia Orch.: Violin Concerto #2 in E (both Bach), recorded 25 Nov., 1955; w. Kondrashin Cond. USSR State SO.: Violin Concerto in D (Beethoven), recorded 1957. [Hearing these magnificent performances reminds one why so many violin aficionados consider KOGAN so highly! Here we hear such pure and inspired playing!] (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL 33-905. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0753)





  • GYORGY CZIFFRA, w.Carlo Maria Giulini Cond. RTF S.O.: Piano Concerto #1 in b-flat (Tschaikowsky), Live Performance, 11 April, 1957; w.Georges Cziffra, Jr. Cond. ORTF S.O.: Piano Concerto #1 in e (Chopin), Live Performance, 9 Dec., 1966. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-833. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (P1323).

    “This disc contains two remarkable live performances of standard repertoire piano concertos by Tchaikovsky and Chopin….The combination of Cziffra and Carlo Maria Giulini in the Tchaikovsky concerto seemed unusual when I first saw it, and in a way it is. The pianist in 1957 tended toward fire-breathing virtuosity and the conductor more toward introspection, lyricism, and elegance….Cziffra employs a lighter touch even at breakneck speeds. The effect is remarkable and is possible only from a supreme technician….Cziffra’s tone is unfailingly lovely, never harsh. One does get a sense, at the end of the first movement, that Giulini and the orchestra are struggling just a bit to keep up with him, but this only adds to the excitement. The whole performance is unlike any other that I’ve encountered in its blend of contrasting elements.”


  • - Henry Fogel, FANFARE






  • ARTHUR GRUMIAUX, w.Istvan Hajdu (Pf.).: Veracini, Beethoven, Brahms, Ysaye, Ravel, Fiocco, Mussorgsky & Bartok. (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-883, Live Performances, 11 Dec., 1959 - Paris; 12 Sept., 1959 - Chartres; Tokyo, 24 April, 1961. [Another jewel of a recital program from the ubiquitous Yves St Laurent] Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (S0752)





  • WALTER GOEHR Cond.: Waltzes, Op.39 (Brahms); WALTER GOEHR Cond. London S.O.: Symphony in C (Bizet); WALTER GOEHR Cond. London Phil.: Carnaval (Schumann); Holberg Suite (Grieg). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL 78-919, recorded 1937-38. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1748)





  • ERICH LEINSDORF Cond. Boston Symphony Orch.: Die Kunst der Fuge – Excerpts; w.SZYMON GOLDBERG: Violin Concerto #2 in E; w.Phyllis Curtin, Beverly Wolff, Ernst Haefliger, Walter Carringer, Norman Treigle, Donald Miller & Thomas Paul: JOHANNES-PASSION (all Bach), Live Performances, 15-16 July, 1966, Berkshire Festival, Tanglewood. (Canada) 3-St Laurent Studio YSL T-740. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1747)





  • WILLIAM STEINBERG Cond. Boston Symphony Orchestra, w.MAUREEN FORRESTER & JON VICKERS: Das Lied von der Erde (Mahler). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-880, Live Performance, 2 Jan., 1970, Symphony Hall, Boston. [This glorious live performance beautifully displays the splendor of the Symphony Hall acoustic.] Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1742)





  • PAUL KLETZKI Cond. Cleveland Orchestra: Variations on a Theme by Haydn (Brahms); Symphony #2 in b (Borodin); w. HENRYK SZERYNG: Violin Concerto #3 in E (Paganini). [If ever there was a sweeter sound produced by a violinist, we have yet to hear it! This is a marvelous program altogether!] (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio T-882, Live Performance, 28 Oct., 1971. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (C1746)





  • LE PROPHETE, Live Performance, 29 Jan., 1977, w.Henry Lewis Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Marilyn Horne, Renata Scotto, James McCracken, Jerome Hines, etc. (Canada) 3-St Laurent Studio stereo YSL T-859. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (OP3316)





  • TOSCA, Live Performance, 13 Jan., 1968, w.Mehta Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Regine Crespin, Gianni Raimondi, Gabriel Bacquier, etc. (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-911. (OP3320)





  • LA TRAVIATA, Live Performance, 6 April, 1957, w.Cleva Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Renata Tebaldi, Giuseppe Campora, Leonard Warren, etc. (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-910. (OP3319)





  • RIGOLETTO, Live Performance, 28 March, 1959, w.Cleva Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Leonard Warren, Roberta Peters, Eugenio Fernandi, Margaret Roggero, William Wilderman, Norman Scott, etc. [This riveting performance was Warren's final Rigoletto at the Met, his very last one being two months afterward on the Met Tour in Toronto, 29 May] (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-864. Transfers by Yves St Laurent. (OP3314)











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    BOOKS ON SALE





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    “Books have become our lonely stepchildren! By spending so many hours constantly revising our thousands of CDs we realize we have paid scant attention to our BOOKS ON SALE, thus many have been added (with more appearing), accompanied by greatly reduced prices! Have a glance at our SALE section - for BOOKS!







    -------------------------------------------------
    SMARTER THAN BOTH OF US ! ! !
    -------------------------------------------------

    We are grateful to so many of our readers who continue to note that our once-regular use of accent marks have become rather erratic. Due to the ever-growing popular use of ‘Smart’ Phones, Google automatically and frequently is restricting such marks, as well as that which we consider regular punctuation. In compliance with Google’s restrictive demands, as well as the fact that such complicated listings will require too long a period during which to download, or may not succeed in downloading at all, most of our newer listings are deleting such marks, much to our sense of loss. While our older listings so far retain such marks, we are informed that it won’t be long before they too automatically will be amended. We certainly take pride in our presentation, but are being compelled to adapt to another loss of style in these fast-paced times! We very sincerely appreciate so many of your valued comments and commiseration!!!



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    . . . numerous out-of-print CDs and LPs,

    [many sealed copies of numerous out-of-print

    additions: The Record Collector, Naxos, VRCS,

    Issues of Symposium's Harold Wayne series,

    Romophone, GOP & many Met Opera

    broadcasts & operas from Moscow’s Aquarius, plus

    numerous lesser-known operas have been added

    throughout our listings, in appropriate categories . . .

    out-of-print books [many biographies,

    Record Catalogue-Discographies . . .

    numerous CDs are added each week] . . .





    ---------------------------------------------------


    Our 50% Discount Sale continues,

    now offering more than 2500 titles . . .





    ------------------ ANNOUNCEMENT -----------------



    Auction #150 Is Now Closed ! ! !


    Norbeck, Peters & Ford's Annual 78rpm Auction is now closed!

    Norbeck, Peters & Ford's new 78rpm AUCTION #150 is now still online for your perusal
    closing date is this Friday, 17 May.

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    Auction #150 Online Catalog

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    Auction #150 Catalog File Download

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    For the recently-offered Archipel, Myto, Gebhardt, Walhall, Melodiya, Vista Vera & Living Stage titles on sale, simply visit our sale section of our website). This is the ideal opportunity at bargain prices to fill in gaps in one's collection.

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  • William Steinberg, Vol. VIII - Mahler 7th - Boston   (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-915)
    C1751. WILLIAM STEINBERG Cond. Boston Symphony Orchestra: Symphony #7 in e (Mahler); 'Linz' Symphony #36 in C, K.425 (Mozart). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-915, Live Performance, 18 Dec., 1970, Symphony Hall, Boston. [...beautifully displaying the splendor of the Symphony Hall acoustic.] Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $29.90
    Arturo Toscanini - NYPO Farewell Concerts  (2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1105)
    C1752. ARTURO TOSCANINI Cond. NYPO: Die Meistersinger - Act I Prelude; Siegfried Idyll; Tristan - Act I Prelude; Liebestod; Die Walküre - Ride of the Valkeryies - Live Performance, 29 April, 1936 - Toscanini's NYPO Farewell Concert; Tannhäuser - Overture & Bacchanal - Live Performance, 3 Feb., 1935; ARTURO TOSCANINI Cond. NYPO: 'The Clock" Symphony #101 in D (Haydn); I Pini di Roma (Respighi); The Swan of Tuonela (Sibelius); Euyranthe - Overture (von Weber), Live Performance, 13 Feb., 1945 - Pension Fund Concert. (Canada) 2-Immortal Performances IPCD 1105, with 1936 broadcast commentary by Davidson Taylor. Published in association with the Toscanini Estate. Transfers by Richard Caniell. The handsome 39pp. booklet features Notes by Robert Matthew-Walker, John Sullivan & Richard Caniell). - 644216110025
    $39.90
    Vlado Perlemuter - Ravel d'apres Ravel, Vol. IV       (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-815)
    P1321. VLADO PERLEMUTER: RAVEL D'APRÈS RAVEL, Vol. IV (featuring the latter's Menuet sur le nom de Haydn; Valses nobles et sentimentales; À la manière de Borodine; À la manière de Chabrier; Le Tombeau de Couperin; Ma Mère l'Oye & Prélude [the latter two in compromised sound]). (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-815, Broadcast Performances, April - June, 1952, Paris, w.broadcast announcements throughout these recitals. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $29.90
    Germaine Thyssens-Valentin;  Beaudry, Debost,  Mollet, Loewenguth Quartet   (St Laurent Studio YSL T-898)
    P1322. GERMAINE THYSSENS-VALENTIN, w.Jacques Beaudry Cond. RTF S.O.: Ballade in F-sharp - Broadcast Performance, 2 March, 1962; w.Michel Debost (Flute): Fantasie for Flute & Piano; w.Pierre Mollet (Bar.): La bonne chanson; w.Loewenguth Quartet: Piano Quintet in c - Broadcast Performance, 1961, Paris (all Fauré). (Canada) St Laurent Studio YSL T-898. Transfers by Yves St Laurent.
    $19.90