Tosca  (Mitropoulos;  Renata Tebaldi, Richard Tucker, Leonard Warren)    (2-MET 10)
Item# LP0407
Regular price: $59.95
Sale price: $29.97
Availability: Usually ships the same business day

Product Description

Tosca  (Mitropoulos;  Renata Tebaldi, Richard Tucker, Leonard Warren)    (2-MET 10)
LP0407. TOSCA, Live Performance, 7 January 1956, w. Dimitri Mitropoulos Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Renata Tebaldi, Richard Tucker, Leonard Warren, Alessio De Paolis, etc. 2-Metropolitan Opera Historic Broadcast Recordings MET 10. Producer: Dorle Soria (Mrs. Dario Soria). Audio Engineer: Tom Owen, R & H Archives. The packaging is in the style of the deluxe RCA Victor Soria Series releases - velvet-covered slipcase edition with an inner box that holds, in addition to the records, an elaborate beautifully-illustrated booklet with background on the opera's Met history by David Hamilton, Thomas P. Lanier & Dorle J. Soria, photos and biographies of the artists, plus a second booklet containing a libretto with translation. Produced by RCA in 1982. Factory-Sealed.

CRITIC REVIEW:

"I heard Tebaldi many times, as a standee at the old Metropolitan Opera House from the mid-1950s through the early 1960s, and I never stopped marveling at the sheer beauty of the voice, her ability to project a pianissimo throughout the auditorium so that even though the note was extraordinarily soft, it sounded as if she were standing right next to you. The plushness of tone was probably the most unique feature of her singing, and along with that an innate sense of the appropriate shape of the phrase she was singing. She was not a subtle actress, never inflecting every phrase with subtexts of meaning the way Callas could, but nor was she a disengaged singer just pouring out lovely sounds. Her acting, both physical and vocal, was sincere and convincing, and at times very powerful. Her Butterfly broke your heart every time, through the moving way she shaped the ebb and flow of the music. There was no way you could see her as a 15 year old geisha, but by the wedding scene of the first act you were a complete believer.

Above all, there was that voice. It was immediately recognizable, distinctive, unlike any other. If you tuned in to a radio broadcast without hearing an announcement, two notes would be enough to identify the richly colored, luxurious sonority of the Tebaldi sound, a sound that caressed the ear and at the same time enveloped you. For many of us it was the sound that defined what an Italian soprano should be."

- Henry Fogel, FANFARE