Der Rosenkavalier  (Clemens Krauss;  Viorica Ursuleac, Georgine von Milinkovic, Adele Kern, Ludwig Weber, Georg Hann, Franz Klarwein)  (3-Preiser 90218)
Item# OP0009
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Product Description

Der Rosenkavalier  (Clemens Krauss;  Viorica Ursuleac, Georgine von Milinkovic, Adele Kern, Ludwig Weber, Georg Hann, Franz Klarwein)  (3-Preiser 90218)
OP0009. DER ROSENKAVALIER, Live Performance, 1942, w.Clemens Krauss Cond. Viorica Ursuleac, Georgine von Milinkovic, Adele Kern, Ludwig Weber, Georg Hann, Franz Klarwein, etc. (Austria) 3-Preiser 90218. Very long out-of-print, Final Copy! - 717281902182

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“During the 1930s Krauss and his second wife, Romanian soprano Viorica Ursuleac, performed at Covent Garden and met the Mills & Boon writer and opera fan Ida Cook (pen-name Mary Burchell) and her sister Louise. Krauss and Ursuleac later asked the sisters to look after their Jewish friend Mitia Meyer-Lismann, who thus became the first person the sisters helped emigrate to the UK to escape Nazi persecution. From 1937 until August 1939 the sisters helped at least twenty-nine families to gain British visas by travelling to Germany and Austria under the guise of wealthy opera-goers, and persuading British citizens to act as guarantors. The sisters corresponded with Krauss and Ursuleac, who would provide details of opera performances and castings in order to make their story more believable, and often performed the sisters’ favourite operas during their visits to Germany. Ida and Louise financed and organised the operation themselves, risking their lives (often unknowingly) by wearing Jewish-owned jewellery and furs on their return journeys, and lying to Nazi officers and border officials. The sisters were among the most effective transporters of Jews to England during this time, and were recognised as Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem in 1964 for their work.

After the war, Allied officials forbade Krauss from appearing in public until 1947, when information about the help that he had provided the Cook sisters in saving Jews from persecution was made public. He resumed his position in Vienna and conducted internationally until his death on tour in South America in 1954. He is buried in Austria next to his second wife, Ursuleac.”

- Abaigh McKee, MUSIC AND THE HOLOCAUST





“Viorica Ursuleac has often been criticized for a slight edge in her voice, with many observing that much of her career was due to the fact that she was married to conductor Clemens Krauss…..The voice is less creamy than Reining’s, more focused, but it shines with a glow and never becomes harsh. Ursuleac’s range of vocal colors is narrower than that of Reining…but hers is overall an enjoyable and satisfying performance, if falling short of greatness.”

- Henry Fogel, FANFARE, March / April, 2020