Turandot  (Molinari-Pradelli;  Nilsson, Corelli, Scotto, Giaiaotti)   (2-EMI 69327)
Item# OP0010
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Product Description

Turandot  (Molinari-Pradelli;  Nilsson, Corelli, Scotto, Giaiaotti)   (2-EMI 69327)
OP0010. TURANDOT, recorded 1965, w. Molinari-Pradelli Cond. Rome Opera Ensemble; Birgit Nilsson, Franco Corelli, Renata Scotto, Bonaldo Giaiotti, etc. 2-EMI 69327, with 58pp. libretto. Very long out-of-print, Final Copy! - 02083117682875

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"Nilsson made so strong an imprint on a number of roles that her name came to be identified with a repertory, the 'Nilsson repertory', and it was a broad one. She sang the operas of Richard Strauss and made a specialty of Puccini's TURANDOT, but it was Wagner who served her career and whom she served as no other soprano since the days of Kirsten Flagstad.

A big, blunt woman with a wicked sense of humor, Ms. Nilsson brooked no interference from Wagner's powerful and eventful orchestra writing. When she sang Isolde or Brunnhilde, her voice pierced through and climbed above it. Her performances took on more pathos as the years went by, but one remembers her sound more for its muscularity, accuracy and sheer joy of singing under the most trying circumstances.

Her long career at the Bayreuth Festival and her immersion in Wagner in general, began in the mid-1950s. No dramatic soprano truly approached her stature thereafter, and in the roles of Isolde, Brunnhilde and Sieglinde, she began her stately 30-year procession around the opera houses of the world. Her United States debut was in San Francisco in 1956. Three years later she made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera, singing Isolde under Karl Bohm, and some listeners treasure the memory of that performance as much as they do her live recording of the role from Bayreuth in 1966, also under Bohm. The exuberant review of her first Met performance appeared on the front page of THE NEW YORK TIMES on 19 Dec., 1959, under the headline, 'Birgit Nilsson as Isolde Flashes Like New Star in 'Met' Heavens'."

- Bernard Holland, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 12 Jan., 2006





“Italian tenors are notoriously susceptible to self-love, but Corelli's resistance is well below the average.”

- Irving Kolodin, the Saturday Review, December, 1965





“Better voices sing these parts with more body and security, but they are dull; they could easily feed their voices onto computer tape and let technology sing for them. Parceling out the notes as each score reads, for only Scotto takes the trouble to distinguish….Scotto is the last of the mad-genius sopranos….When she goes, opera is [will be, and is] in a lot of trouble. Above all, she is mistress of the traditions, with a grasp on authenticity.”

- Ethan Mordden, DEMENTED, THE WORLD OF THE OPERA DIVA, p.99