Parsifal (1958)  (Knappertsbusch;  Hans Beirer, Eberhard Waechter, Josef Greindl, Jerome Hines, Toni Blankenheim, Regine Crespin) (4-Melodram GM 1.0058)
Item# OP0100
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Product Description

Parsifal (1958)  (Knappertsbusch;  Hans Beirer, Eberhard Waechter, Josef Greindl, Jerome Hines, Toni Blankenheim, Regine Crespin) (4-Melodram GM 1.0058)
OP0100. PARSIFAL, Live Performance, 1958, w.Knappertsbusch Cond. Bayreuth Festival Ensemble; Hans Beirer, Eberhard Wächter, Josef Greindl, Jerome Hines, Toni Blankenheim, Régine Crespin, etc. (Croatia) 4-Melodram GM 1.0058. Outstanding sound quality! Long out-of-print, Final Sealed Copy! - 608974110581

CRITIC REVIEW:

"The conductor Hans Knappertsbusch had an unmatched way with Wagner's PARSIFAL. I heard Knappertsbusch conduct PARSIFAL at Bayreuth, but I never saw him there. At Bayreuth, the sunken orchestra pit masks both conductor and orchestra, and after PARSIFAL there are no curtain calls.

Knappertsbusch is legendary today as one of the last Teutonic musical mystics, conductors who protracted Wagner's ruminations to extreme length but sustained a solemn rituality that brisker modern maestros miss. Knappertsbusch's gravity was enlivened by an intuitive sense of drama. Famous for his lack of interest in rehearsals (‘You know the work, I know the work - till tonight then’, he once said, dismissing an orchestra early), he responded to the music as the occasion inspired him and swept his players along.

No opera was closer to him than PARSIFAL. Although the facts are unclear, it was apparently the first work he ever conducted in public, and definitely the last. In between came a youthful apprenticeship with Hans Richter and Siegfried Wagner at Bayreuth, countless performances and, finally, under the most emotionally charged circumstances imaginable, the chance to lead it at Bayreuth. But because of his lack of success in the Nazi era, Knappertsbusch was the preeminent choice when the Allies finally allowed Bayreuth, which had become a potent symbol of Nazi ideology, to reopen in 1951.

In all, this Bayreuth account is a magisterial statement of the score, never surpassed on records."

- John Rockwell, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 11 July, 1993