Die Walkure  (Bodanzky;  Marjorie Lawrence, Kirsten Flagstad, Kerstin Thorborg, Lauritz Melchior, Paul Althouse, Friedrich Schorr, Ludwig Hofmann, Emanuel List)  (3-Walhall 21)
Item# OP0314
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Product Description

Die Walkure  (Bodanzky;  Marjorie Lawrence, Kirsten Flagstad, Kerstin Thorborg, Lauritz Melchior, Paul Althouse, Friedrich Schorr, Ludwig Hofmann, Emanuel List)  (3-Walhall 21)
OP0314. DIE WALKÜRE, Live Performances, 2 Feb., 1935 (Act I) & 18 Dec., 1937 (Acts II & III), w.Bodanzky Cond.Met Opera Ensemble; Marjorie Lawrence (as Brünnhilde), Kirsten Flagstad (as Sieglinde) [Met Début, 1935], Kerstin Thorborg, Lauritz Melchior / Paul Althouse, Friedrich Schorr, Ludwig Hofmann / Emanuel List, etc. (England) 3-Walhall 21. Very long out-of-print, Final Sealed Copy. - 5019148605119

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“Given the almost knee-jerk reaction to Flagstad among critics as ‘matronly’, many will be surprised at the femininity of her Sieglinde. Her voice positively glows, and she and Melchior are a thrilling pair…It is true that Flagstad lacks the ability or willingness to inflect with the kind of specificity that was a Lehmann specialty. But this Sieglinde makes her impact through floods of glorious tone.

Schorr was the Wotan of his day for a reason, and it is demonstrated here by both his ability to characterize with tone color and his ability to sing the music both beautifully and forcefully at the same time. The interchanges between Schorr and Lawrence never feel like merely great Wagnerian singing, but actually engage us as real music drama.”

- Henry Fogel, FANFARE Nov./ Dec., 2014



"[Lawrence] makes a stunning entrance with the battle cry: her attack is firm, her trills well articulated, the high B excellent, and the treacherous octave leaps (not swoops as so often heard) are as clear and clean as mountain air. All the uncontained joy of the warrior maid is suggested in her knifelike thrusts of brilliantly colored tone."

- Paul Jackson, SATURDAY AFTERNOONS AT THE OLD MET, p.163