Stiffelio (Verdi)  (de Fabritiis;   Mario del Monaco, Angeles Gulin, Goiulio Fioravanti  (2-Legato Classics LCD 169)
Item# OP0469
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Product Description

Stiffelio (Verdi)  (de Fabritiis;   Mario del Monaco, Angeles Gulin, Goiulio Fioravanti  (2-Legato Classics LCD 169)
OP0469. STIFFELIO (Verdi), Live Performance, 26 Dec., 1972, w. de Fabritiis Cond. Teatro San Carlo Ensemble, Napoli; Mario del Monaco, Angeles Gulin, Giulio Fioravanti, etc.; OTELLO - Excerpts, Live Performance, 9 Nov., 1972, Brussels, w. Ferraris Cond. Mario del Monaco, Katia Ricciarelli & Aldo Protti. 2-Legato Classics LCD 169. Long out-of-print, Final Rare Sealed Copy! - 036674169224

CRITIC REVIEW:

"Mario del Monaco was one of the most widely recorded singers of the 1950s and 60s and divided his busy operatic career between Europe and America during those years. Sir Rudolf Bing, then manager of the Metropolitan Opera, heard Mr. del Monaco's debut as Radames in Verdi's AIDA at the San Francisco Opera in 1950 and asked the tenor to stop in New York for a guest appearance at the Met in Puccini's MANON LESCAUT on his way back to Europe. Mr. del Monaco's singing made a distinct impression and won him a long and prosperous relationship with the Met beginning the next year. At the New York company from 1951 to 1959, he sang 102 times, in 16 roles. He appeared on the Met's tour 38 times. His last performance at the Met was as Canio in Leoncavallo's PAGLIACCI in 1959. But he returned three years later to Carnegie Hall in a concert of arias and duets with Gabriella Tucci.

Indeed, when Mr. del Monaco was loved, it was for the brilliant, stentorian quality of his voice rather than for his subtlety of phrase or ability to act. And in a profession often peopled by overweight tenors, Mr. Del Monaco offered a classic profile and dark good looks that made him an attractive presence on stage.

Mario del Monaco was born in Florence in 1915 and grew up in nearby Pesaro where his father was employed in city government. His parents were both musically inclined and encouraged his singing. Although he had some lessons, he was largely self-taught. Mr. del Monaco made his professional debut in Puccini's MADAMA BUTTERFLY in Milan in 1941. He spent the war years in the Italian Army. After the war, Mr. del Monaco's career blossomed and spread to Milan's La Scala and London's Covent Garden as well as opera houses in Rome, Naples, Barcelona, Lisbon and Stockholm. In 1946, he sang in Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro, moved northward to Mexico City and then on to San Francisco for his American debut. Mr. del Monaco's relationship with the Metropolitan Opera ended in 1959, reportedly by mutual consent, but he was recording until the end of the 1960s. In 1973, he joined a gathering of prominent tenors in Naples to honor Caruso's centenary and press reports spoke of his 'personal glamour and still thrilling dynamism'.

Mr. del Monaco retired to his villa near Venice later in 1973 and turned to teaching. Mr. del Monaco and his wife, Rina Fedora, a former singer, had two sons. One of them, Giancarlo, is now a stage director in Europe's opera world."

- Bernard Holland, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 19 Oct., 1982