Eliza  (Cherubini)   (Capuana;  Tucci, Raimondi, Zanasi)   (2-Myto 00322)
Item# OP2620
Regular price: $13.90
Sale price: $6.95
Availability: Usually ships the same business day

Product Description

Eliza  (Cherubini)   (Capuana;  Tucci, Raimondi, Zanasi)   (2-Myto 00322)
OP2620. ELIZA (Cherubini), Live Performance, 10 May,1960, w.Capuana Cond. Maggio Musicale Fiorentino Ensemble, Firenze; Gabriella Tucci, Gianni Raimondi, Mario Zanasi, etc. (E.U.) 2-Myto 00322. - 0801439903227

CRITIC REVIEWS:

“ELIZA, ou Le voyage aux glaciers du Mont St Bernard (Eliza, or The Journey to the Glaciers of Mont St Bernard) is an opéra-comique in two acts by Luigi Cherubini with a French libretto by Jacques-Antoine de Reveroni de Saint-Cyr. It was first performed at the Théâtre Feydeau, Paris on 13 December 1794.

Cherubini made great use of local colour in his music for ELIZA. Its setting in the Swiss Alps was probably inspired by the contemporary popularity of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. The score includes a ranz des vaches, a traditional melody played by Swiss herdsmen. ELIZA marked an important stage in the development of French Romanticism and was also popular in Germany. Cherubini's musical evocation of nature (nightfall, the storm) influenced Carl Maria von Weber, who was particularly fond of the opera.”



“Gabriella Tucci, an Italian soprano whose richly expressive voice and beguiling stage presence made her a mainstay at major international houses who, from the start of her career in the 1950s in Italy, was praised for her lustrous sound and the velvety smoothness and refinement of her singing. An unaffected and subtly compelling actress, she was best known for her interpretations of the spinto repertory, like her rendition of the title role of Verdi’s AIDA, which demanded both lyric soprano lightness and the vocal heft to lift soaring phrases over an orchestra. Yet Ms. Tucci displayed notable range during her career. She brought brightness and agility to coloratura soprano parts, like Elvira in Bellini’s I PURITANI, and fervor and carrying power to the title role of Puccini’s TOSCA. In a 2002 interview with OPERA NEWS, she attributed the confidence of her singing to good technique and common sense. ‘I saved my voice’, she said. ‘I never tried to push, to make the voice seem bigger or stronger that it was’. If one has the technique, she emphasized, ‘you can sing lightly, you can sing, you know, smiling, sorriso, and you can sing dark’. True to the Italian operatic heritage, she emphasized the importance of the text. ‘All the answers are there’, she said.

During her prime years, from the late 1950s into the early ’70s, Ms. Tucci earned consistent respect from critics and loyal fans but tended to be overshadowed by star sopranos who also sang her repertory, including Maria Callas (for a period), Renata Tebaldi and Leontyne Price. That she was held to comparison with the greats of her day was, if somewhat unfair, inevitable. When the Metropolitan Opera introduced a new production of Verdi’s OTELLO, conducted by Georg Solti, in March 1963, Ms. Tucci was called upon to take over the role of Desdemona from Tebaldi, who had withdrawn. ‘Stepping into the shoes of Renata Tebaldi’ had to be ‘a thankless task’, the critic Paul B. Affelder wrote in THE BROOKLYN EAGLE, but ‘the attractive young Italian carried it off with dignity and sensitivity, gaining considerable effect by slightly underplaying the part’. And, he added, ‘one could wish for no finer singing of the ‘Salce’ and ‘Ave Maria,’ her two big arias in the final act’ . Her granddaughter Flaminia Filoni explained in an email, Ms. Tucci drew from her ‘own strength’ even as a child. She put great effort into her studies and throughout her career remained ‘very precise and stubborn’, Ms. Filoni said. Ms. Tucci continued her studies at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, the Rome conservatory, working with the vocal coach Leonardo Filoni. They married in 1955; he died in 1993.

She made her debut in a leading role as Leonora in Verdi’s LA FORZA DEL DESTINO at Spoleto in 1951, opposite the celebrated tenor Beniamino Gigli, then 61. ‘I had to learn the role, and I was a little bit afraid to face it’, she said in the OPERA NEWS interview. But she had six months to prepare. ‘It was really emotional for me to sing with this god’, she said. ‘But he was very kind. He said ‘Brava, brava’. Appearances followed in Florence, Venice and, in 1959, Milan, where she made her debut at La Scala as Mimì in Puccini’s LA BOHÈME. The next year she sang the title roles of AIDA and TOSCA at Covent Garden in London.

Following her American debut with the San Francisco Opera, Ms. Tucci made her Metropolitan Opera debut in October 1960 as Cio-Cio-San in MADAMA BUTTERFLY, winning strong reviews. She went on to sing 259 performances with the Met in 20 roles, mostly in works by Verdi and Puccini. She appeared in four new productions, including Verdi’s FALSTAFF in 1964, which was also the Met debut of both the director Franco Zeffirelli and the conductor Leonard Bernstein. That Rudolf Bing, the Met’s general manager at the time, valued Ms. Tucci was clear from the double-duty assignment he gave her on April 16, 1966, the company’s last day at its old house: She sang Mimì at the Saturday matinee and took part in the gala farewell to the house that night, ending the program in a performance of the final trio from Gounod’s FAUST (with the tenor Nicolai Gedda and the bass Jerome Hines).

She fared equally well in the new house. Reviewing her as Liù in Puccini’s TURANDOT in 1968, Harold C. Schonberg of THE NEW YORK TIMES wrote: ‘Has the first-act aria ‘Signore, ascolta’ been sung more touchingly, more artistically, more elegantly in recent years? One doubts it’.

Ms. Tucci sang Marguerite in FAUST in her final performance at the Met, in December 1972.

Though she can be heard on historic recordings of live performances and radio broadcasts, Ms. Tucci made only two studio recordings of complete operas, both early on: Leoncavallo’s PAGLIACCI in 1959 (starring the tenor Mario del Monaco) and Verdi’s IL TROVATORE in 1961 (with an exceptional cast that also included Franco Corelli). ‘I don’t live in my past’, she said in the 2002 interview. ‘Inside me, nothing has changed. I’m still Tosca. I’m still Aida. But now, above all, I’m Gabriella’.”

- Anthony Tommasini, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 17 July, 2020





“The Italian tenor Gianni Raimondi had a prestigious career lasting three decades. From 1956 to 1976 he sang frequently at La Scala, where his partner a number of times during the early years was Maria Callas. His voice, smooth and warm in tone with a good coloratura facility and very strong top notes, was ideal for 19th-century Italian opera from Rossini and Donizetti to Verdi and Puccini and he rarely sang anything outside that repertory, apart from a few French rôles and a couple of modern operas.”

- Elizabeth Forbes, THE INDEPENDENT, 27 Oct., 2008





“Mario Zanasi completed his formal musical education at La Scala's school of singing; sang Monterone in 1953 (Teatro Comunale, Florence), in 1954 in LOHENGRIN (Cesena). He then sang in Portugal, France, Belgium and Germany. In 1958 he sang at the Met and Covent Garden - Later on he sang in Vienna, Chicago, Dallas, Miami, San Francisco, Montréal and Zürich.

His repertoire included: Cherubini's ELIZA, MARIA DI ROHAN, I PURITANI, PAGLIACCI, CAVALLERIA, MADAMA BUTTERFLY, TOSCA, ERNANI, GIOVANNA D'ARCO and IL TROVATORE.”

-Zillah Dorset Akron