Don Carlos (Verchi;  Franco Corelli, Mary Curtis-Verna, Jerome Hines, Sereni, Uhde, Dalis, Arroyo) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-973)
Item# OP3345
$39.95
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Product Description

Don Carlos (Verchi;  Franco Corelli, Mary Curtis-Verna, Jerome Hines, Sereni, Uhde, Dalis, Arroyo) (2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-973)
OP3345. DON CARLOS, Live Performance, 15 April, 1961, w.Verchi Cond. Met Opera Ensemble; Franco Corelli, Mary Curtis-Verna, Mario Sereni, Jerome Hines, Hermann Uhde, Irene Dalis, Martina Arroyo, etc. [Truly humbling to realize how we simply took for granted performances of this grandeur some 60 years ago! Corelli is at his glorious peak in this performance, with the under-rated Curtis-Verna, Dalis, Sereni & Hines equally in his league - all captured in glorious, opulent sound in the warm acoustic of the venerated Old House!] (Canada) 2-St Laurent Studio YSL T-973.

CRITIC REVIEWS:

"Franco Corelli had been singing for well over a decade when he made his Met debut in 1961 at the age of 40. The first attraction in any Corelli performance is the voice itself. Solid and evenly produced from bottom to top, with no audible seams between registers. The middle and lower parts of the voice are dark and richly colored. The top is stunningly brilliant, and never thins out or turns hard. It is a once-in-a-generation kind of voice if your generation is lucky, and in the four decades since his retirement in 1976 we have had nothing like it for visceral power. Some critics complained because Corelli would hold high notes well beyond their value in the score. But if we listen to singers from the past whose careers overlapped with the great Italian opera composers, and who often worked with them, we can easily conclude that the composers expected it. (A recording of an aria from Francesco Cilea's ADRIANA LECOUVREUR by tenor Fernando de Lucia, with the composer accompanying at the piano, exposes liberties that go far beyond anything Corelli ever did, and Cilea echoes those 'distortions' at the keyboard.)"

- Henry Fogel, FANFARE





“Mary Curtis-Verna, a Metropolitan Opera soprano of the 1950s and ‘60s who became famous for stepping into the roles of ailing, stranded or otherwise indisposed divas, often on only a few hours’ notice, was known to opera aficionados for her large, flexible voice and astute musicianship. Ms Curtis-Verna…appeared in nearly 100 performances…and was partnered with some of the best-known male singers of the era, among them Leonard Warren, Richard Tucker and Jussi Björling.”

- Margalit Fox, THE NEW YORK TIMES, 27 Dec., 2009





“Although he never achieved the star status of his some of his baritone contemporaries in the Italian repertory, Mario Sereni was an unfailingly sincere, intelligent artist of great commitment….Sereni, was a valuable member of the Metropolitan Opera’s roster for more than 27 seasons, beginning with his company debut, as Carlo Gerard in Andrea Chenier, in 1957. Sereni enjoyed a long and steady career at the Metropolitan Opera. In twenty-seven seasons, he sang most of the important baritone roles of the Italian repertory in opera such as Ernani, Luisa Miller, Il Trovatore, La Traviata, Un Ballo in Maschera, La Forza del Destino, Don Carlo, and Aida. He also sang in La Gioconda, Cavalleria Rusticana, Pagliacci, Manon Lescaut, La Boheme, and Madama Butterfly, as well as L'Elisir d'Amore and Lucia di Lammermoor. In 1964, Sereni was a memorable Ford in the first performances of Franco Zeffirelli’s beloved Met staging of Falstaff, conducted by Leonard Bernstein. He also appeared in the 1972 Met gala saluting Rudolf Bing. Sereni made his last appearance with the Met in 1984, as Schaunard in La Boheme.

Sereni was also a regular guest at the opera houses of Chicago, San Francisco and Dallas. He also enjoyed a successful international career appearing frequently at the Vienna State Opera, La Scala in Milan and the Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires.

Despite his success, Sereni always remained in the shadow of the more charismatic baritones of his time, principally Leonard Warren, Robert Merrill, Ettore Bastianini, Rolando Panerai and Piero Cappuccilli, yet Sereni’s many recordings reveal a singer and musician of considerable distinction, with a handsome voice, a solid technique, and a fine sense of style.”

- OPERA NEWS, 1 Aug., 2015





"The American bass Jerome Hines had a long and distinguished career at the Metropolitan Opera singing a wide variety of roles with true consistency of voice and style. He appeared with the company for more than 40 years from 1946. An imposing figure - he was 6ft 6in tall - he had a voluminous bass to match his stature.

His charismatic presence made him ideal for the many roles demanding a big personality. It was thus hardly surprising that Sarastro in THE MAGIC FLUTE, Gounod's Mephistopheles, the high priest Ramfis in AIDA, the Grand Inquisitor in DON CARLOS, Boris Godunov, and King Mark in TRISTAN UND ISOLDE were among his leading roles.

Although always faithful to the Met, Hines made many forays abroad. In 1953, he undertook Nick Shadow, with Glyndebourne, at the Edinburgh festival, in the first British performances of Stravinsky's THE RAKE'S PROGRESS. That led to engagements in leading houses in Europe and south America, and eventually to Bayreuth, where he sang Gurnemanz, King Mark and Wotan (1958-63). In 1958, he made his La Scala debut in the title part of Handel's HERCULES, and, in 1961, he first appeared at the San Carlo in Naples, in the title role of Boito's MEFISTOFELE. His Boris Godunov, at the Bolshoi in Moscow in 1962, was, by all accounts, a deeply impressive portrayal.

He was fortunate to arrive at the Met just as the opera house was in need of replacements for the great Ezio Pinza, who had decided to appear in SOUTH PACIFIC. Unlike his distinguished predecessor, Hines could also sing the German and Russian repertory, in addition to Italian and French. In all, his innate musicianship stood him in good stead. Most of his discs derived from live performances. They reveal a sterling voice, a refined style, consisting of a burnished tone, a fine line and exemplary diction, although he never seems to have have been a very profound interpreter.

Hines was both a deeply religious person and a good writer. He combined these qualities in his own opera, I AM THE WAY, a work about Jesus, performed, with Hines as the protagonist, at Philadelphia in 1969. The previous year, he had published his autobiography, THIS IS MY STORY, THIS IS MY SONG, but his most lasting volume was GREAT SINGERS ON GREAT SINGING (1982), in which he made discerning comments on the art of many colleagues.

Hines' later appearances befitted his advancing years: he was Arkel, the elderly grandfather in PELLEAS ET MELISANDE (Rome, 1984), and the blind father in Mascagni's IRIS (Newark, 1989). His last stage appearance was as Sarastro, in New Orleans in 1998, when he was 77."

- Alan Blyth, THE GUARDIAN, 13 Feb., 2003